Tag: Self Defense

Gun Rights Are Civil Rights

 

Gun control tended to be used to disarm blacks when they were first introduced. Has the justification changed that much since then? Do the leaders of the democratic party actually have a much higher view of blacks than when Wilson was watching Birth of a Nation in the White House theater, or LBJ was cynically using the Civil Rights Act for votes?

Join Jim and Greg as they welcome the second amendment conversion of a New York liberal who now sees the value of a gun for self-defense and how restrictive laws don’t keep weapons away from bad guys. They also cheer the news that many environmental activists are packing up and leaving D.C. after Thursday’s Supreme Court decision on the EPA. And they sigh as President Biden tells Americans they will be stuck with high gas prices until Ukraine defeats Russia.

 

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Another Ricochetti (Ricochettum as singular?) (*)  commented, “Conservatives have statistics, liberals have anecdotes.” I propose that we practice developing and using more anecdotes to help our neighbors better understand the gun debate. So many people seem to reason in anecdotes, and so few people seem to be able to deal with statistics. As a lawyer, […]

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I’m not a gun guy. I like guns, I appreciate guns, and I’m familiar with guns, but I don’t enjoy guns. Some guys like nothing better than a day on the range popping off a few boxes of ammo. For me, using a gun is like driving a vehicle or working a chainsaw. I use these dangerous […]

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Join Jim and Greg as they wrap up the week with three big stories. First, they recoil at the radical anti-Israel statement from Georgia Democrat Raphael Warnock. They also fire back at the Democrat in Texas who wants to limit when you can defend your life and property. And they react to a Los Angeles Times editor urging Sen. Dianne Feinstein to resign so Gov. Gavin Newsom can appoint both black and Latino senators.

The Last Bad Choice He’ll Make

 

We had an incident here in Polk County that involved a lethal shooting. In many other communities, there would have been shouting about gun control, and the shooter would have at least been arrested. Not in Polk County.

Here’s what happened: Two couples went out for the evening. At the end of the date, the two fellows drove the two women to one of the women’s homes. The fellows drove off after one of the couples had a bitter discussion, after which the two women entered the home.

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President Trump might not be a typical Republican, but he is making the same mistake Republicans always make. It’s true that Democrats are baiting federal officers to shoot violent insurgents. But all Republicans should know after a lifetime of experience that Democrats attack with slanderous narratives regardless of the facts.  Whether or not federal officers […]

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Our own Sam Jacobs sat down with Matthew Larosiere. Matthew Larosiere is the Director of Legal Policy at the Firearms Policy Coalition and an unashamed supporter of the Second Amendment without exceptions. He is also an early adopter of the 3D printer, something that he has become very skilled at using to make full firearms, […]

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Roof Koreans: How Civilians Defended Koreatown from Racist Violence During the 1992 LA Riots

 

Roof Koreans: How Civilians Defended Koreatown from Racist Violence During the 1992 LA RiotsThe riots of the spring of 2020 are far from without precedent in the United States. Indeed, they seem to happen once a generation at least. The 1992 Los Angeles Riots are such an example of these “generational riots.” And while most people know about the riots, less known – though quite well known at the time – were the phenomenon of the so-called “Roof Koreans.”

The Roof Koreans were spontaneous self-defense forces organized by the Korean community of Los Angeles, primarily centered in Koreatown, in response to violent and frequently racist attacks on their communities and businesses by primarily black looters and rioters during the Los Angeles Riots of 1992. Despite their best efforts, over 2,200 Korean-owned businesses were looted or burned to the ground during the riots. It is chilling to imagine how many would have suffered the same fate had the Koreans not been armed.

Standing on the rooftops of Koreatown shops they and their families owned, clad not in body armor or tactical gear, but instead dressed like someone’s nerdy dad, often smoking cigarettes, but always on alert, the Roof Koreans provide a stirring example of how free Americans of all races can defend their own communities without relying upon outside help.

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Many on the Left are disdainful of those of us who own guns: we’re a bunch of rednecks who drink too much and wildly wave our guns around. The reality could not be further from the truth, but the radical Left is determined to protect us from ourselves, right? I think not. Preview Open

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Diaz Doesn’t Dope

 

Nate DiazThis is not a political story, in the party-politics sense at least. It is a story about protecting your reputation in the face of bureaucracy, modern corporate calculations, and the 24/7 cable sports and social media environment. The protagonist is one of two brothers who have fought professionally for practically their whole lives, and who are now reaching the age cruel to combat sports practitioners. In considering the latest tale of Nate Diaz, brother of Nick, we might find generally applicable lessons. In that sense, maybe you could take it as a parable for the politics of our day.

Nate Diaz officially weighs in at a very long and lean 170 pounds in the UFC. He has won 22 of his 33 professional fights. He fought his way into the UFC, out of other lower-level promotions, by winning the Ultimate Fighter 5 tournament. He is known as a working-class brawler from the rough part of town in Stockton, California, yet his victories break down 5 knockouts/ 12 submissions/ 4 decisions. That is, he is more likely to win choking or manipulating an arm until his opponent taps out, surrendering to avoid serious damage. At the same time, that mixture of wins and losses points away from ever being a fair-haired boy in the organization.

The Diaz brothers have always been known for playing the rebel; the “don’t give a [redacted]” fighters. This matters to our tale. Nate Diaz has also been known for fighting clean, long before the UFC teamed up with the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency (USADA) for a rigorous anti-doping regime. Nate has been vegetarian for a very long time, and he has that super-lean look all the time. He occasionally eats eggs or seafood, but these fit within the broad category of “vegetarian” practice and mean he is not exposed to the flesh of animals fed or injected with growth chemicals. He runs, really runs, all the time, so has endurance to burn. It can be the fifth five-minute round in a championship or main event and Nate Diaz can come out of his corner with a blur of hands and feet striking from all angles. This matters to our tale.

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This woman was waiting at a bus stop early in the morning, when a punk approached aiming a gun at her in an attempted robbery.  Instead of complying with his demands, she pulled her own permitted concealed weapon and made sure the would-be assailant assumed room temperature.  Have a look at the article, then I’ll […]

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Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America briefly react to the news Martha McSally will be appointed to fill the Arizona Senate seat once held by John McCain until the next election.  Then they welcome a New York judge lifting the ban on nunchucks in the state and offering a great defense for the right to keep and bear arms in the process.  They also squirm a bit as a growing number of economic forecasters think we could hit a recession in 2019.  And they discuss the presidential prospects of Hawaii Rep. Tulsi Gabbard, who gained admiration on the right for her criticism of Obama foreign policy until she inexplicably started defending Syrian dictator Bashar al-Assad.

Caution: Using This Product Against Armed Citizens Might Result in Injury or Death

 

A video showing an armed plainclothes Brazilian police woman fighting back against an armed attacked has gone viral and is popping up all over my social media feed. My friend John Corriea breaks down the video from a tactical perspective on his YouTube channel, but caution: There is no blood shown, however, someone does wind up assuming room temperature. The video itself and how’s it’s gone viral, though, have some interesting implications for the larger efforts to fight back against gun control and keep and expand our right to self-defense.

One of the methods currently used by those opposed to the right of self defense is the proven strategy of making guns “uncool,” and holding gun manufacturers liable for their misuse, which is essentially the same methods used against the tobacco companies to limit the use of their products.

One of the examples of this strategy in the fight against private ownership of guns is the efforts to repeal the Protection in Lawful Commerce in Arms Act, (PLCAA) which shields firearms manufacturers from frivolous lawsuits designed to drive them out of business, such as the lawsuit brought against online ammo seller Lucky Gunner by the parents of a victim of the Aurora theater shooter, implying somehow that Lucky Gunner was liable because they somehow knew beforehand that their ammo was going to used in such a horrific manner. Due in part to the PLCAA, the suit was dismissed by Judge Richard P. Matsch, who also order the plaintiffs to pay a healthy chunk of Lucky Gunner’s legal fees (which Lucky Gunner later earmarked for use by gun rights organizations (*sniff*… I love a happy ending…).*

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“Right now, America is in a state of fundamental moral conflict. On the one side, we have a group of people with incredible power available at their fingertips. Most of them have no desire to hurt anyone and simply wish to be left alone. A relatively minor few have abused that power and caused catastrophic […]

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Image courtesy of firearmtraining.NRA.org If you don’t know about “gaslighting,” the term comes from the stage play, Gas Light, and the two films based on it. They’re about a man who convinces his wife she’s going insane, by telling her she’s only imagined things that were, in fact, very real. Among other things, he causes […]

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NeverTrumper and Trumpista alike should read this. It’s one of best articles I’ve read (and I have read a LOT of them) on the thought process that goes along with choosing to be your own first responder.  It’s a myth that gun owners despise regulation. Instead, they tend to believe that government regulation should have […]

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The Unbalanced Scales of Las Vegas

 

Over the last 24 hours, I’ve been doing something I don’t normally do: I’ve been debating the right of self-defense with gun-control advocates on social media. I don’t normally do this because I find most gun-control arguments rather tiring. However, it’s been interesting to note the assumption of guilt in the minds of a great number of gun control supporters, and the National Rifle Association in particular as the source of their wrath, as if the NRA itself gave somehow gave tips to the Las Vegas murderer on how to perform his horrible deed.

The NRA is not responsible for this, neither are its millions of members. I am not in favor an entire group responsible for actions of one man, because the minute you do such things, you lay down tracks for the boxcars headed east.

Why then do people see a need to scapegoat the NRA here? I can think of a number of reasons why: