Tag: seder

Passover, Houses of Worship, and Intimacy

 

On Passover/Pesach I spent a sweet and deeply moving (and fun) time at the @iwe family seders. It’s not unusual for them to last until 1:30 to 2 a.m., and I’ve been told those are short ones! As always, they were inspiring and educational, and I’ve so enjoyed being with the iwe family for Pesach over the last four years.

During the seder, we spend a lot of time asking questions and discussing many aspects of the exodus from Egypt and the purpose of the rituals we practice. At one point (although I don’t remember the specific context), the topic came up of the Beis HaMikdash, the Second Temple built by Herod, expanding on the ruins of the first. Consider that Herod’s purpose was not just to bring people together and to honor G-d, but to build a magnificent monument to Herod’s power and glory. In fact, the Second Temple was a huge facility but might have lacked spiritual warmth. That might not have been the kind of building that G-d had commanded to be built.

I thought about this comment and realized that Herod’s Temple may have been more about Herod than G-d, and it lacked one very important ingredient to connecting with G-d: intimacy.

Member Post

 

For some Jews, the Passover or Pesach holiday in the Spring is one of the most treasured of all the Jewish holidays. The celebration of G-d’s freeing the Jews from the Egyptians is called “seder,” which means “order.” In part, the name suggests that a particular order is followed for this meal at this auspicious […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Next Year in Jerusalem!

 

I had no sooner walked through the front door with Son #1 when I was attacked and hugged by a delighted child, Son #5. I have never, ever been greeted so enthusiastically, anywhere. Son #5 had seen me the past two years when I went to the @iWe home for the Passover/Pesach celebration. He was either very pleased to see me (or was counting on my reading him some stories during my stay). Then Son #1 instructed him matter-of-factly to take my carry-on bag and backpack up to my room, two and one-half flights up. And this same Son #5, uncoached, pulled out my chair for me at the Seder meals. Did I mention he is seven years old and 4’1” tall (so he tells me)?

When I entered the iWe home, I had entered the space of timelessness and antiquity, of celebration and remembering the suffering in leaving the slavery of Egypt. This Pesach celebration, like the past two years, was a time of sweetness, poignancy, history, and memories. The iWe family takes both seriously and joyfully their celebration of Pesach, and I can’t imagine being anywhere else to connect to my Jewish roots with both moments of sadness and much happiness.

Although I’ve only been to one other orthodox Seder, I believe iWe when he says theirs is not the ordinary Seder. We follow the order of the meal (seder means order), but everyone is encouraged to ask any question about Pesach. Silly questions don’t earn a piece of candy, but good questions do. I even asked a pretty good question this year, and iWe kindly acknowledged its relevance (although I suspect he says that to all his guests). The three oldest boys carried on a fascinating discussion about one portion of the Exodus story, running up and down the stairs to bring Jewish source books to back up their arguments. Their joy in possibly identifying a new way of looking at this 3,000-year-old story was palpable. (It’s hard to know if anyone outside the room would have accepted their theory, but it was very bright and creative.) And the singing, ah, the singing. When iWe sings with his older boys in sweet harmony, we are all transported to a time of deserts, hardship, freedom, and joy.

Member Post

 

Tonight we host the biggest collection of Ricochet-members to date at our Seder! We have iWe, kidcoder, I Shot the Serif, #2 son (who only lurks, but has a blacksmithy-type-handle), with a guest starring role for the 5th Rico-person… I’ll let her speak for herself as and when she chooses to do so! The table […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Member Post

 

The story of the Exodus is fascinating, the liberation of a people three thousand years ago. The story of the story of the Exodus is far more fascinating, and it is still being written and told. “The single most important thing you can do for your family may be the simplest of all: develop a strong […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Passover: The Essence of Judaism —iWc

 

Passover starts tomorrow night. Torah-observant Ricocheteers have been building up to this moment for months now – cleaning, and preparing and learning and planning… whew! The iWc home has an average of 15 people for 8 separate formal meals (we are eating out for 2 of them) over the course of 8 days.

I wanted to share a thought that will be new to all readers. Here goes!