Tag: Seattle

More Dispatches from the Pacific Northwest Loony Bin, a.k.a., Seattle

 

Sometimes it seems like the residents of Seattle are completely detached from reality. While those of us in the real world are hard at work at our jobs, Seattleites are rallying in the streets, protesting Chase Bank’s “Alleged Fossil-Fuel Investments.” Please enlighten me. Why, pray tell, would anyone give a rat’s behind whether a bank has fossil-fuel investments? The said bank isn’t even headquartered in Seattle! Maybe what they’re really protesting is the bankruptcy of the Seattle institution, Washington Mutual, in the 2008 financial crisis. Chase bought WaMu out of bankruptcy and the locals have never quite forgiven them for it. But any institution with any kind of “fossil-fuel” ties gets protested around here.

And then, there’s the story of employees at Seattle’s second-largest employer, Amazon.com, who are irked by Amazon’s “growing ties to the oil industry.” Just like with the Google employees protesting their employer’s work for the US military, Amazon employees think it’s actually their business whether Amazon works with the oil industry. These inmates seem to think they run the asylum. I sure hope that Amazon management lets them know that they do not, and it’s really none of their business who Amazon customers are. They are just acting like the spoiled brats they are.

Delivering on the Promise: Amazon Moving Staff Out of Seattle

 

Seeing how Seattle values their company (or not), Amazon management announced this week that they will move their worldwide operations team from Seattle to Bellevue (across Lake Washington).

The move will take some months and will involve only a fraction of their total of 45,000 Seattle employees, but it sends a message to the socialist-progressive politicians who run the city, that they cannot count on Amazon’s taxes to fund their utopian agenda.

Christopher F. Rufo joins City Journal editor Brian Anderson to discuss an urban struggle with street homelessness and the political fight around it in the Pacific Northwest’s largest city.

Known as the “Emerald City” because its surrounding areas are filled with greenery year-round, Seattle has recently seen an explosion of homelessness, crime, and drug addiction. Municipal cleanup crews pick up tens of thousands of dirty needles from the streets, and tent-villages have become a regular presence.

Welcome to Seattle

 

Seattle’s Mayor, Jenny Durkan, held a town-hall meeting in Lake City, in North Seattle. Here is a bit of what happened (from the KOMO web site):

“The city government works for the people, and more and more these days there’s more disconnect between people and their government,” Mayor Durkan said. “I think it’s really important to get into communities and listen to what’s working, what’s not working, how we can get better.”

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The sentence that caught my interest was “It’s an urgent question, because the government and justice system cannot function if citizens are afraid to go near the courthouse.” The title of the story on the KOMO News web site is “Rampant Crime outside King Co. Courthouse frustrates council, cops“.  It seems that jurors can’t go […]

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A short while ago, the city council of Seattle unanimously passed an “employee hours tax,” more commonly called a “head tax” on businesses with $20 million of gross income earned in Seattle. The tax was intended to pay for more “services for the homeless” whose plight were supposedly caused by all those disgusting, high-paying jobs […]

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The New Battle in Seattle: Don’t Blame Amazon for the City’s Housing Woes

 

Seattle has decided to be a last-minute entrant into the competition for Amazon’s HQ2. But while most cities — such as Boston and Washington — are trying to land the retailing giant’s second headquarters, Seattle is doing its best to make Amazon reconsider the importance of its current home base. The company “will continue to evaluate its long-term plans for Seattle after the City Council passed a bill to tax large businesses to fund homelessness services,” according to the Seattle Times. Recall that when a larger tax was being considered, Amazon had halted planning one new office building and was considering subleasing the office space on another that’s under construction.

“What people in New England who hate Trump are really saying is ‘I make over $100 grand a year and I have a graduate degree.'”

So says Fox News host Tucker Carlson in this bonus edition of the Behind The Blue Wall podcast. He also talks about his family’s connections to Maine, the bizarre story of the book-banning “bookstore,” and why you’ll never hear the phrase “I can’t believe you said that” from him.

Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America enjoy watching Democrats publicly feud over how prominent the impeachment issue should be in 2018.  They also shake their heads as the Seattle City Council tries to fight homelessness by taxing companies $275 for every employee if the business makes more than $20 million per year.  They fire back as Never Trump “Republican” Steve Schmidt says Trump’s decision to embassy is only a calculation for the midterm elections and that the president has blood on his hands from the violence along the Israel-Gaza border.  And Jim offers a champagne toast to mark the passing of prolific author and National Review friend Tom Wolfe.

Senseless in Seattle

 

On first inspection, Seattle is and ought to be the envy of the rest of the United States. In 2017, its population stood at about 713,000 people and was growing at 3.1 percent per year, the fastest growth rate of any US city. Its economic revival has been driven by an influx of new software, technology, and internet companies. Among the major corporations headquartered there are Amazon, Starbucks, Nordstrom, and Weyerhaeuser.

But all is not well in Seattle, which is now riven by deep political divisions over what to do about the problem of homelessness. Right now, about 8,000 people within the city limits are homeless, and the city saw 169 homeless deaths in 2017. The progressive leadership within the City Council has introduced or adopted a number of measures to address this issue that are sure to backfire. The first is a special head tax on employment; the second is an ordinance that forbids landlords from inquiring into the criminal records of prospective tenants; and the third is a steep increase in the city’s minimum wage. But the real problem is that sixty-nine percent of Seattle is zoned only for single-family homes, which means there is a sharp division between where wealthy elites live and where lower-income and less-educated people are congregated. The progressive city council has maintained these barriers, with profound social consequences.

This past week, the Seattle City Council announced plans for a head tax of $500 per employee, but only on those 500 or 600 businesses in the city that gross over $20 million dollars per year. That money will be used to provide for low-income housing and emergency services for homeless people. That tax works out to over $20 million per year for Amazon, which employs some 45,000 people in Seattle. Amazon did not take kindly to this special tax that could easily rise over time. It thus took the extraordinary step of stopping construction on its new 17-story office tower on Rainier Square that on completion could house an additional 7,000 to 8,000 workers. Its exit threat is credible. Amazon has opened up new office spaces for about 5,000 more workers in Boston and Vancouver—the latter in part because of the difficulty of getting suitable visas into the United States. And it is actively looking for a second headquarters—that it could convert into its new primary hub. Remember Boeing left town in 2001.

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I just posted this over at RushBabe49.com. The City Council of Seattle is about to approve a ‘head tax” for large businesses in Seattle, over which they have had some opposition. But the Big Gun sounded off this afternoon, and I applaud them. Our KOMO News has been doing a great job with their reporting. […]

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Several years ago, Vancouver BC created safe injection sites, supervised by medical personnel, so IV drug users could come out of the alleys, and prevent public drug use and overdoses. Two years ago, Seattle authorized two sites, one in Seattle and one in a suburban area. As of today, no sites have been approved or […]

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Where have we heard this before?  Mayor Durkan hasn’t even held office for 6 months yet, and has proposed a new, larger, property tax levy.  This is copied from the KOMO-Seattle Web site. Mayor Durkan proposes education levy to expand preschool program, access to college by KOMO Staff Preview Open

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Back in January I wrote this post about trying to put together a Ricochet Meetup in Seattle or thereabouts. Now that we have an actual plan I reckoned that I ought to write a fresh post so someone doesn’t have to read three pages of comments to get the latest (final?) iteration of the plan. […]

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This is a quote from an article on the KOMO News Web site, regarding homelessness in Seattle: The City has six sanctioned homeless camps. Organizers say 843 people were housed throughout the camps last year, with one in 10 finding employment and one in six moving into permanent housing. Preview Open

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