Tag: Sean Hannity

ACF PoMoCon #12: Plague Politics

 

Pete Spiliakos and I talk about politics in the age of the plague–what’s so insane about supply-side economics, what it means to think politically and prudentially, what the common good requires, and how to understand our weaknesses that we may deal with them. Fear is good, seriousness is required, preparing for the crisis unfolding, and planning for overcoming it is the sequence we need to go through. Pete and I have praise for Tucker Carlson and Sen. Tom Cotton, and a lot of criticism for everyone else.

Member Post

 

Within the last 48 hours I’ve heard both Sean Hannity and Mark Levin refer on their radio shows to the “transcript” of Trump’s July 25th conversation with President Zelensky of Ukraine, the telephone call that might, in theory at least, give us a President Pence (admittedly a prospect not without horrors of its own). The […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America are encouraged that six months before the midterms, DNC Vice Chairman Keith Ellison is promising that people will die if Democrats don’t win.  It’s an indication that Democrats don’t have much of an agenda to run on other than fear and opposing President Trump.  They also throw up their hands as congressional Republicans reportedly have no plans to try to pass a budget this year because it will be really hard to pass in the Senate.  They react to Sean Hannity being named as one of Michael Cohen’s clients, and while there may be no legal scandal, Hannity is definitely wrong to have not disclosed this connection.  And Jim has some theories about the man in the sketch released by Stormy Daniels.

Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America discuss President Trump’s Asia trip and how most of the visits suggested a good working relationship with key leaders.  Jim offers his take on the Roy Moore saga, pointing out that we often think we know political figures and are shocked when allegations come forward, but he says the truth is we know very little about them at all.  And they shake their heads as Sean Hannity fans publicly destroy their Keurig coffee machines after the company pulls advertising for Hannity’s TV show over his coverage of the Roy Moore story.

Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America are glad to see the NFL concluding that the national anthem protests need to move to an actual effort to improve community-police relations and that the players ought to stand.  They also slam Twitter for the second time this week, this time for suspending the Twitter account of actress Rose McGowan, who was assaulted by Harvey Weinstein and has called out actor Ben Affleck for not admitting he knew of Weinstein’s past.  And they shake their heads as Fox News host Sean Hannity hammers Sen. Ben Sasse for being critical of President Trump’s call for licenses of media outlets to be challenged over “fake news.”

Member Post

 

I was tiring of Hannity long before he became a 24/7 tool for Trump. My eyes uncontrollably roll every time he claims he’s conservative and his overuse of “literally,” his faux attempt at “jes’ bein’ oneah USE guys,” is more than I can stomach. Anyhow, Hannity decided to do some mad yipping in Jonah Goldberg (aka […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Never Trump, Never Hillary, and Strategic Miscalculations

 

Cpqxa9fUEAA13s6On the flagship podcast some weeks ago, Bob Costa explained Donald Trump’s theory of the 2016 election. Among the country’s large body of nonvoters, Trump sees disaffected Americans who are disgusted by both parties. He believes his nationalist, populist message will resonate and bring waves of them to the polls. In fact, he believes he can bring them out in such numbers that he can afford to lose the votes of the limited-government, Tea Party, Reaganite Republicans who heretofore composed the GOP base. Costa’s reporting is corroborated by that of others, and bolstered by Trump’s own public statements. (“There were statements made about me — those people can go away and maybe come back in eight years after we serve two terms…. Honestly, there are some people I really don’t want.” Regarding party unity: “I don’t think it’s necessary; people will be voting for me and not for the party.”)

So is Trump’s strategy correct? Recent opinion polls suggest not. He is behind nationally, in swing states, and even in former GOP bastions. He claimed he would put states like NY in play; instead, he is 30 points behind there. The signs are clear: Trump has lost more Republicans than voters he has brought in. Jettisoning Reagan Republicans in favor of Reagan Democrats would appear to have been a strategic miscalculation.

At the outset of the campaign, many commentators and Ricochet members considered Trump’s strategy eminently plausible. Trump, they claimed, was a different kind of candidate, with a media savvy the others lacked. He could reach new voters by “disrupting the narrative” and bending the media to his will, inducing them to cover the stories he desires. In a sense, he has done just this, though not in the manner his supporters had hoped. His outrageous newsmaking has repeatedly distracted the media from Hillary’s deepening scandals: using racial language to criticize the judge on the Trump University case, starting a spat with parents of a Gold Star recipient, making bad jokes about Russian espionage and armed insurrection, calling for tribute from NATO members before honoring our treaty obligations, insisting that Obama “founded ISIS,” and more. In view of Trump’s daily whining about media treatment, however, it would appear that relying on his ability to generate positive attention for conservative causes — among them Hillary’s corruption — was a fairly large strategic miscalculation.

Member Post

 

So this week my Casper mattress that I purchased at the behest of all of the podcasts I listen to advertising for them arrived today (yes, I did use the coupon code) via UPS. This is the second mattress purchase I’ve made since moving out of my mother’s house in 2008 after graduating college. You […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

We Have Met the Enemy and She Is Us, Does This Explain Marie Harf?

 

Marie Harf box art V1_1600px

While I was uploading some large files, I decided to try my hand at video editing by taking three clips of everyone’s favorite State Department spokesperson, Marie Harf, saying that, “we can’t kill our way out of this war,” with Islamic State. She also implies that jobs is the answer to radical Islamic barbarism, that they need a different path in life. She delivers basically the same propaganda (shades of Susan Rice) to CNN’s Wolf Blitzer, MSNBC’s Chris Matthews and MSNBC Joe Scarborough (who wanted to give her a mulligan on her previous comments but she declined).

I’ve included a bonus clip of Col. Ralph Peters, appearing on Fox News, who said that, “Marie Harf is Exhibit A for the comprehensive failure of the US educational system,” which is absolutely priceless taken in the context of her remarks over the last two days.