Tag: SCOTUS

Join Jim and Greg as they offer up two bad martinis and a crazy one. First, they shake their heads in disbelief and deep skepticism that the Supreme Court couldn’t figure out who leaked Justice Alito’s majority opinion in the Dobbs case, which resulted in the overturning of Roe v. Wade. They also hammer President Biden for demanding no conditions whatsoever to an extension of the debt ceiling, even though his unconstitutional plan to “forgive” student debt by forcing the bill on other taxpayers caused this debate to happen months earlier than it should have. Finally, they roll their eyes at reports that Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack was tapped to co-chair the Supply Chain Disruption Task Force but never went to a single meeting.  Seems to be a lot of that going around with Biden cabinet secretaries.

Jim and Greg are back for the third round of their prestigious Three Martini Lunch Awards. Today, they discuss the biggest lies of 2022, with Jim focusing on our economy and Greg opting for an infuriating falsehood connected to our elections. Then, they reveal their choices for the best and worst political theater of 2022.

Join Jim and Greg as they discuss only good things today! First, Jim describes his wide-ranging interview with Virginia Gov. Glenn Youngkin about his plans for the coming year, what issues matter most, and whether he’s thinking about running for president. They also welcome the Supreme Court issuing a temporary stay that keeps the “Remain in Mexico” policy in place until a formal decision is in place. Finally, they dive into why “Die Hard” is obviously a Christmas movie and share other thoughts about what makes it such a great film.

Jim and Greg take time to reflect on what they are politically thankful for in 2022. Their items range from a war thousands of miles away to key developments right here in the U.S. And they offer some things they are personally thankful for too…including you! Happy Thanksgiving! We hope you enjoy this special edition of the 3 Martini Lunch.

This week on Hubwonk, host Joe Selvaggi talks with constitutional scholar Thomas Berry about the important questions being decided in the more high profile cases facing the newly opened session of the Supreme Court. They discuss how the addition of newly appointed Justice Ketanji Brown Jackson could add a fresh perspective on the concept of originalism.

Guest:

Member Post

 

Republicans are often accused of initiating war on cultural issues and “taking away rights.” But it’s congressional Democrats who are using issues like abortion and same-sex marriage for purely political purposes and, in effect, attacking religious liberty. The latest is an effort by Senate Democratic Majority Leader Charles Schumer (D-NY) to bring legislation to the […]

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Summary

The U.S. Supreme Court’s 2021-2022 term is over, and its final ruling was on the “Remain in Mexico” case brought against the administration by the states of Texas and Missouri. But that is only one of a large number of immigration cases filed over the past year and a half since President Biden’s inauguration. The Center for Immigration Studies hosted a conversation on immigration-related lawsuits brought against the Biden administration, at 1 p.m. on Wednesday, July 6. The discussion focused on specific cases being litigated as well as on how litigation has affected decision-making in the executive and how it might influence Congress’s framing of legislation.

This week on Hubwonk, host Joe Selvaggi talks with Ilya Shapiro, constitutional scholar, author, and senior fellow of Constitutional Studies at the Manhattan Institute, about the changing makeup of the court, and how this term’s most high-profile decisions reveal the judicial philosophies that comprise the current bench.

Guest

Join Jim and Greg as they welcome the Supreme Court marshal urging state officials in Virginia and Maryland to protect Supreme Court justices and stop protests outside their private homes. But they do wonder why it took her almost two months to do this. They also get a kick out of California Gov. Gavin Newsom trying to claim there is more freedom in California than in Florida in his laughable attempt to troll Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis. And they fume as yet another mass shooter littered the internet with his fascination with other mass killings.

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Summary

The Supreme Court finished its 2021-2022 term with the release of Biden v. Texas, a case brought against the administration by the states of Texas and Missouri. Most of the media attention has focused on the Court’s finding that the Biden administration may rescind the Trump-era Migrant Protection Protocols (MPP) – often referred to as the “Remain in Mexico” – policy. But receiving little attention is that the key issues in the matter were remanded to the lower courts. These are the issues that will have lasting impact on immigration policy and how it is enforced.

Overturning Roe and Obergefell Leads to … Cousin Marriage?

 

In a comment elsewhere, I was pondering the meaning of the overturning of Roe v. Wade.  While liberals are having a tizzy about Justice Clarence Thomas’ comments about gay marriage and contraception, I think they might be looking at it the wrong way.

Obergefell requires all states and territories to recognize same-sex marriages from any and all states, to uphold them, and to provide for them as a function of due process and equal protection.  Same-sex marriage cannot be banned.

Join Jim and Greg as they welcome the second amendment conversion of a New York liberal who now sees the value of a gun for self-defense and how restrictive laws don’t keep weapons away from bad guys. They also cheer the news that many environmental activists are packing up and leaving D.C. after Thursday’s Supreme Court decision on the EPA. And they sigh as President Biden tells Americans they will be stuck with high gas prices until Ukraine defeats Russia.

 

Nicole GelinasRafael A. Mangual, and Robert VerBruggen join Brian Anderson to discuss the Supreme Court’s ruling in NYSRPA v. Bruen, including its possible effects on public safety in New York City, the implications of its legal reasoning, and the likely response by city and state lawmakers.

Find the transcript of this conversation and more at City Journal.

Join Jim and Greg as they cheer the Supreme Court decision declaring that bureaucratic agencies like the EPA don’t have the power to make sweeping policy changes – that power belongs to Congress alone. They also slam President Biden and other Democrats for pushing limited suspension of the filibuster to pass legislation to codify Roe v. Wade and pass the left’s attempt to federalize elections. And they have some fun with Vice President Kamala Harris insisting Biden will run again in 2024 with her as his running mate and then later saying he intends to run

 

This week on “The Learning Curve,” co-hosts Gerard Robinson and Cara Candal talk with Arif Panju, a managing attorney with the Institute for Justice and co-counsel in the U.S. Supreme Court school choice case, Carson v. Makin; and David Carson, the lead plaintiff. Panju shares the key legal contours of Carson v. Makin and the potential impact of the Court’s decision in favor of the plaintiffs. They delve into the origins of the Maine school tuitioning program, and the change in the early 1980s that resulted in discrimination against religious families. They also review the 2020 Supreme Court ruling, Espinoza v. Montana Department of Revenue, which was a major victory for the Institute for Justice and school choice. Carson reflects on what motivated his family to join this case and take such a courageous stand for school choice and religious liberty, and what it has been like being involved in such a high-profile U.S. Supreme Court case.

Stories of the Week: Cara and Gerard review the impact of the Pell Grant program, launched 50 years ago this week, in helping to expand access to higher education. What would high school look like if it were designed to give students job-based learning experiences and marketable skills upon graduation?

This week on Hubwonk, host Joe Selvaggi talks with CATO Institute research fellow Trevor Burrus about the recent U.S. Supreme Court decision New York State Rifle and Pistol Associate v. Bruen and its implications for an individual’s right to carry a fire arm in states such as Massachusetts.

Guest:

Roe v. Wade Is Over!

 

Today, June 24, 2022, on the Feast of the Sacred Heart of Jesus no less, the Supreme Court of the United States overturned the 1973 ruling that took abortion laws out of the hands of the people and essentially made it permissive to kill unborn children at will.  This is a historic day!  From the Catholic News Agency:

The Supreme Court has overturned Roe v. Wade in a historic 6—3 decision released Friday that brings a sudden and dramatic end to nearly a half-century of nationwide legalized abortion in the U.S.

Join Jim and Greg as they break down the monumental U.S. Supreme Court ruling overturning the Roe v. Wade and Planned Parenthood v. Casey decisions that had declared a constitutional right to an abortion. They welcome the ruling as being correct from a constitutional perspective and for the good it will do in saving lives.  They also note that not much immediately changes on abortion law and that the 50 states will now determine how they each approach the issue.

In addition, they point out the Homeland Security warning about widespread violence as a result of the ruling, and Jim highlights how the decision of a justice who strongly supported abortion contributed significantly to Friday’s verdict.

Join Jim and Greg as they cheer the Supreme Court decision confirming that gun owners do not need to “show cause” to get a concealed carry permit. They also criticize four Senate Democrats for demanding Google not include any information on pregnancy resource centers when people search for abortion services. And they wonder why the Biden administration is banning Juul vaping products.