Tag: science fiction

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Quote of the Day: Rossum’s Universal Robots

 

“Robots of the world! The power of man has fallen! A new world has arisen: the Rule of the Robots!” — Karel Čapek

Rossumovi Univerzální Roboti (Rossum’s Universal Robots), a once-popular 100-year old play by Czech writer Karel Čapek, made its television debut on the BBC, 82 years ago today, on February 11, 1938. It was the first televised science-fiction program in world history, introducing a wider audience to the term in the play’s title, one which has endured with increasing significance in the English language ever since: “robot.”

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. This Week’s Book Review – Frozen Orbit

 

I write a weekly book review for the Daily News of Galveston County. (It is not the biggest daily newspaper in Texas, but it is the oldest.) After my review appears on Sunday, I post the previous week’s review here on Sunday.

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I write a weekly book review for the Daily News of Galveston County. (It is not the biggest daily newspaper in Texas, but it is the oldest.) After my review appears on Sunday, I post the previous week’s review here on Sunday. Book Review ‘Freehold: Resistance’ revisits Williamson’s war from multiple viewpoints By MARK LARDAS […]

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Beams of searing light flashed across the landscape, leaving white-hot scars on the mountainside. The Specter stood undeterred. A mind-bending torrent of unlight roared forth from its outstretched hands, while several cyber-knights frantically evaded the attack. Alex felt his legs scream in protest as he leapt to another vantage point. They needed the appropriate banishing […]

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Warning: Some Spoilers Ahead! I went into my late showing of Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker with expectations low enough to make the bottomless sarlacc pit seem like an inflatable kiddie pool. Up to this point the chief effect of popular “sci-fi”’s encounter with director J.J. Abrams has been to leave the genre “scarred […]

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. The Dead Will Be Remembered

 

He woke up wondering whose dream he had dreamed of. Whose memory was the dream based on? And as he wondered every morning, who was he who dreamed the dreams of others?

In the last dream of the night, he had lived in India in a small town, larger than a village, but not one of the great cities. The details came back to him: his name in the dream, where he had lived, what he had done. He had been an educated man and knew geography, being able to point to his town on a map.

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. This Week’s Book Review – The Best of Jerry Pournelle

 

I write a weekly book review for the Daily News of Galveston County. (It is not the biggest daily newspaper in Texas, but it is the oldest.) After my review appears on Sunday, I post the previous week’s review here on Sunday.

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The article, for reference: https://medium.com/@RodFaulkner/how-a-1990s-science-fiction-television-series-predicted-the-age-of-trump-5ff3808dc9b3 More

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Alex ran down the stairs, despite his Boswell warning he was exceeding safe velocities. Metal clanged under his shoes as he passed the patch-up job near the exit. No stopping me now.  He all but leapt out the door, where the fading light cast his long shadow over the school. He caught his breath outside, […]

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. ‘1636: The China Venture’ Delivers Another Great Adventure

 

Eric Flint’s standalone time-transposition novel “1632” proved so popular it metastasized into a series of some 30 novels and 12 collections of short stories.

The premise is a small town in West Virginia gets transposed in time and space with a similar volume from 17th century Thuringia in Germany. At the height of the Thirty Years War.

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. The Near Side of Space

 

“This is really important. I need this at the top of your list.”

The boss-man looks haggard. He’s definitely not been getting enough sleep. And, judging by the look in his eye, he knows exactly how silly of a request he’s making. He’s still gotta make it. He and I aren’t the only ones on this call, and the boss-man has boss-men of his own to appease. That’s life.

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I write a weekly book review for the Daily News of Galveston County. (It is not the biggest daily newspaper in Texas, but it is the oldest.) After my review appears on Sunday, I post the previous week’s review here on Sunday. More

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. This Week’s Book Review – Final Frontier

 

I write a weekly book review for the Daily News of Galveston County. (It is not the biggest daily newspaper in Texas, but it is the oldest.) After my review appears on Sunday, I post the previous week’s review here on Sunday.

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A few years ago when a handful of Ricochetti went to the World Science Fiction Convention in Kansas City, I created a post called WorldCon Journal so the attendees would have a place to post comments on what we’ve been doing as the convention went on. Since a few of us are going to be […]

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. This Week’s Book Review: My Enemy’s Enemy

 

An Islamist attempt to detonate an atomic bomb in downtown Washington DC on Independence Day is accidentally foiled by a South Carolina sheriff. Knowledge of the attempt is suppressed. (Why let the bad guys know how close they came to success?) U.S. retribution is thorough and secret.

This is the launch pad for “My Enemy’s Enemy” a science fiction thriller by Robert Buettner. The terrorist group launching the attack has learned of a new way to strike Washington DC, a secret with its roots in Nazi Germany. And they plan to try again. The Asp — a top terrorist is sent on a solitary mission to the US.

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. ‘Noir Fatale’ a Collection of Short Stories Linked by Theme

 

Cherchez la femme — look for the woman. The phrase defines one sub-genre of noir mystery fiction.

Noir Fatale: The Dark Side of Science Fiction and Fantasy, edited by Larry Correia and Kacey Ezell, explore that sub-genre in science fiction and fantasy.

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Corporations as Nations

 

Science fiction often predicts future technologies, quandaries, or at least identifies a general direction of development. These days, the genre is most often associated with off-Earth adventures, artificial intelligence, and robotics. Another common theme has elicited fewer comparisons to reality in mainstream press: government by mega-corporations.

We limited-government conservatives and libertarians recognize the problems and dangers of regulatory capture. We know that over-regulation of industries can lead to revolving doors and cozy deals that give the largest corporations unjust advantages over smaller companies.

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Book Review: All the Plagues of Hell

 

There are few better pure storytellers than Eric Flint and David Freer. Individually they’re entertaining. Together, the result is splendid. “All the Plagues of Hell,” by Eric Flint and David Freer is the latest novel in the Heirs of Alexandria fantasy series. Set in the middle of the 15th century, it’s alternate history. In this world magic works.

This book centers on Count Kazimierz Mindaug, a long-standing series villain. A Lithuanian nobleman, he fled Lithuania after a failed attempt to kill its leader, Duke Jagiellon (possessed by the demon Chernobog). Mindaug took shelter in Hungary serving the evil King Emeric of Hungary and Countess Elizabeth Barthody. Both were killed earlier in the series. Mindaug escaped, but their destruction left Mindaug with no protector against Chernobog, vengefully pursuing Mindaug.

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