Tag: schools

Join Jim and Greg as they welcome growing evidence that coronavirus transmission rates are very low in the schools. Jim explains why the Trump campaign’s accusations of massive election fraud don’t seem to hold water. And they shake their heads as Barack Obama reveals why his Middle East peace efforts went nowhere.

Join Jim and Greg as they discuss Senate Democrats unloading on Minority Leader Chuck Schumer over Democrats failing to win several highly targeted seats this year. Is his job safe? They also unload on Joe Biden’s plan to tax gun owners $34 billion and ban some of the most popular rifles and magazines on the market. And they dissect New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo melting down over COVID, schools, and law enforcement officers refusing to endorse his absurd policy on Thanksgiving gatherings.

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I spend 3 days a week in CA, specifically the bay area. To shine some light on the lack of thought diversity my own 5 year old asked me “who is voting for Trump, all I see is Biden signs?” I usually keep my politics close to my chest when I’m around other parents. I […]

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From Andrea Widburg, American Thinker: The San Francisco Unified School District is using the Wuhan virus as an excuse to finish destroying what was once one of the best public high schools in the country. Those who object have gotten a snootful of Critical Race Theory (CRT) for daring to believe in academic excellence. Preview […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Get Children Back in School – Now

 

The COVID school shutdown is a disaster for America’s schoolchildren, especially the young and the poor. America’s undereducated students have had a permanent hole blasted into their educational experience, creating a gap that will never be filled.

It didn’t have to be. It didn’t happen because of the virus or even our perverse reaction to it. The educational shutdown isn’t necessary for the health of our children. It is the result of the selfish intransigence of the teachers’ unions and Democrats ceaselessly searching for ways to make Trump look bad.

The American Academy of Pediatrics, along with the CDC, advises against the school closure. They note that shutting down schools “places children and adolescents at considerable risk of morbidity and, in some cases, mortality.” Children’s health overall, including COVID, is improved by being in school.

Join Jim and Greg to close out the work week as they cheer a better-than-expected jobs report for July. They also wade through the egregious alleged financial improprieties at the National Rifle Association and the political overreach of New York attorney General Letitia James. And they’re a bit stunned as New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo announces all schools in his state are welcome to return to in-person instruction this fall.

Join Jim and Greg as they are hopeful that a Microsoft purchase of TikTok will protect the privacy of millions of Americans and let everyone keep their little app. They also slam local officials in Maryland in Virginia who are clearly drunk on power. And they get a kick out of the obvious timing of a New York Times opinion column suddenly suggesting we ought to do away with presidential debates.

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Unless we do something about this [busing], my children are going to grow up in a jungle, the jungle being a racial jungle with tensions having built so high that it is going to explode at some point. We have got to make some move on this. So said the current Democratic nominee for President […]

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If we don’t open schools soon, kids mental development will be so stunted they will think Joe Biden is smart and full of energy. Not opening schools in September is insane. Preview Open

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Join Jim and Greg as they react to the Minneapolis City Council announcing an end to the police department but only after a year of community discussions. They also react to school officials in three major cities deciding to stop having resource officers in the schools. And they unload on New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio yet again for his personal and professional approaches to the coronavirus.

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Lunch Shaming, Pros and Cons

 

The topic of “lunch shaming” has gathered lots of interest on social media. I’m particularly interested since I sit on my local school board. A quick recap: the feds fund lunches for families who qualify (just over half of our families with a total student population of just over 1,300 kids, K-12). The rest of the parents can send a lunch or put money into an account with the cafeteria service. An important thing to note is that kids in the lunch line can’t tell if someone else is getting a free meal or not.

Some other factors: if the free meal population reaches a high enough threshold, the school can provide all meals for free at federal expense. During the summer, the feds fund free meals for entire families. This is a program of which I suspect most people are completely unaware.

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Meritocracy Is Not the Problem

 

George Packer’s recent jeremiad in The Atlantic offers an object lesson on the disarray of modern progressive thought. Packer’s essay, about K-12 education in New York City, rails against two enemies: “a brutal meritocracy and a radical new progressivism,” which, he argues, are ripping apart the social fabric of New York City. His exhaustive lament, detailing his and his wife’s desperate effort to navigate a broken system for their two children, lacks any systematic analysis of the institutional forces driving the problems he identifies. He also never questions his deep faith in an enlightened social welfare state.

He begins the essay pointing to the painful experience of parents who spent a cold February night in sleeping bags outside the schoolhouse door in order to obtain places for their children in a desirable public preschool whose slots are awarded on a first-come, first-served basis. Packer attributes this extreme behavior to the “organized pathologies of adults” who have surrendered to the brutal meritocracy.

But he does not ask why similar instances do not occur in school districts outside New York City. A good place to start is with the law of supply and demand. New York constrains supply of seats in charter schools by an iron set of political forces. Old private schools are hard to expand and new ones are even harder to create. The shortage of good schools is well understood by parents who think a night in the cold is a good investment in their children’s future. There is no bidding system for existing seats. Nor is the City able to expand the supply of desirable school seats in the short run.

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. That’s How I Roll

 

Tuesday’s bike ride was a 50-miler(*) from Sidney to North Lewisburg, Ohio. It was my closest ever approach to Columbus from the west, by any means of transportation. Along the way, I took photos at four township halls.

I had hoped one of them might be a picturesque old schoolhouse. There are some like that in Ohio and other parts of the Old Northwest. But today’s were all pole barns, broadly defined. These are usually less interesting, but one of the sites did have some traces of the old connection between township government and schools, from the days before school districts became independent of local governments, for better or worse.

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One of the improvement goals of the small school I work for is to pursue grants to fund needs for library, science lab, and technology. These can be costly endeavors difficult to fund from the general budget. Well, there’s sports too, I suppose. Uniforms, weight room, ball fields, locker rooms, equipment—these are important in the life […]

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Beginning with Columbine High School in Colorado, there have been all too many school shootings and related violence either by students or former students. Most of the shooters failed to survive the experience to explain why they did what they did. But with the latest shooting in Santa Fe, TX, we understand that the kid was unhappy […]

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Where have we heard this before? Mayor Durkan hasn’t even held office for 6 months yet, and has proposed a new, larger, property tax levy. This is copied from the KOMO-Seattle Web site. Mayor Durkan proposes education levy to expand preschool program, access to college by KOMO Staff Preview Open

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Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America are not all surprised by President Trump firing Secretary of State Rex Tillerson given their distant relationship and they hope Mike Pompeo can be effective as America’s top diplomat. They also unload on Hillary Clinton after her ugly overseas explanations that Trump won the red states by appealing to people who don’t want blacks to have rights or women to have jobs and that white married women backed Trump because they did what their husbands or bosses told them to do. And they slam liberal school administrators for actively supporting Wednesday’s National School Walkout to push for gun control.

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. All They Need Is a Name

 

Over the last few weeks, I’ve felt ill-at-ease about the shootings at Parkland in a way that went far beyond the deaths and desperation that has followed the episode. I finally put my finger on my perceptions. And it raised great concern for me. Let me summarize first what has been happening nationwide regarding the shootings, students, and protests.

Students are obviously in great emotional pain and are motivated to take action following the traumatic experience of the shootings. They have come together for a primary cause. They have made the National Rifle Association their primary focus/scapegoat, and secondarily the legislature. They are saying to everyone that you are either anti-gun or against their teens. Companies have boycotted the NRA. Those who didn’t support the calls for new legislation are the enemy. Hundreds of students and adults all over the country have organized protests. Millions of dollars have been donated to their cause, including GoFundMe sites, many of which are for the survivors and their families; included with the donors are Oprah Winfrey, George Clooney, and his wife.

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Assimilation Is Stigmatized: Let’s Write a New Narrative

 

The United States has always taken pride in its ability to assimilate its new immigrants, creating an exciting and diverse fabric for the American ethos. Lately, though, there has been much discussion about the unwillingness of immigrants, legal or not, to assimilate into this country. I began to think about the meaning of assimilating, what it used to define and what has changed. It became clear to me that this is an issue that must be addressed and that may be even more serious than immigration problems themselves.

What does it mean to be absorbed or integrated into the culture?

The Left planted the seeds about 100 years ago for redefining assimilation, and we now live in a society that is fractured and fractious. I believe these are the events that brought us to our situation today.