Tag: San Francisco

Welcome to the Harvard Lunch Club Political Podcast for December 5, 2017 – number 152 – it’s the San Francisco Dodges a Bullet edition of the show with your hosts Hartford radio guy Todd Feinburg and nanophysicist Mike Stopa.

Today we have special guest and good friend (really, she’s a friend…we have had a beer together at a restaurant and everything. I think it was twice even) Jessica Vaughan. Jessica is the Director of Policy Studies for the Center for Immigration Studies and about as knowledgeable as anyone in America about immigration issues. (And, did I mention? she’s a friend).

On Lawfare and Legend of Lucretia

 

The legends of ancient Rome tell the story of Lucretia. It tells how the age of the Roman Kingdom ended and the age of the Roman Republic began. It is the story of why the last Roman king, a true tyrant, named Tarquinius Superbus (Tarquin the Proud, as in “the arrogant”), was finally overthrown. It also shows the powerful public outrage over the wrongful death of a virtuous woman.

The legend goes that, one night, a group of Roman nobles was getting drunk and bragging about whose wife was the most virtuous. To settle the argument, they rode to each of their houses so that the others could see just how their wives spent their idle time. All of the wives were found feasting or relaxing, except for Lucretia, the wife of Collatinus. When the nobles arrived at the house of Collatinus, Lucretia was found busily spinning wool. Her virtue and her beauty caught the drunken eye of Sextus, the son of King Tarquin.

On the next day, while Collatinus was away, Sextus returned. Since he was a cousin of Collatinus, Sextus was received by Lucretia as a relative and as a guest. Sextus then threatened, blackmailed, and raped Lucretia. Later, when Sextus had left and Collatinus had returned, Lucretia told her husband what Sextus had done, and then, to preserve her honor, she drew a knife and killed herself. Immediately afterward, Collatinus, Brutus, and others swore an oath that the evil Tarquin family could no longer be allowed to rule over Rome. They spread the news of the outrage of Lucretia’s death far and wide. Tarquinius Superbus and his family were soon exiled and the Roman Republic was born.

Jim Crow Comes to San Francisco

 

San Francisco Public Defender Matt Gonzalez is protecting Sheriff Ross Mikarimi, not “defending” Kate Steinle’s killer.

In an attempt to influence the jury pool for the upcoming Kate Steinle murder case, Public Defender Matt Gonzalez wrote a mawkish San Francisco Chronicle op-ed in which he portrayed the alleged killer, Juan Francisco Lopez-Sanchez, as misunderstood and maligned.

He penned, “the truth is he’s never previously been charged with a crime of violence. He is a simple man with a second-grade education who has survived many hardships. He came to the U.S. repeatedly because extreme poverty is the norm in many parts of Mexico. He risked going to jail so that he could perform a menial job that could feed him.”

Victor Davis Hanson explains how political and cultural changes in California have eroded the state’s status as a national leader.

Member Post

 

I write a weekly book review for the Daily News of Galveston County. (It is not the biggest daily newspaper in Texas, but it is the oldest.) My review normally appears Sunday. When it appears, I post the previous week’s review on Ricochet. Seawriter Book Review ‘The Golden Gate’: A tense adventure story with romance involved […]

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The Left’s Next Battlefront If you thought the transgender bathroom was the hill upon which the progressive movement would die, get ready for the next outrageous little war the left is waging against common sense. Last week the City of San Francisco passed an amendment (9-2) to lower the voting age to 16 years old. It will appear […]

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Mr. C. spent last week working with some customers from San Francisco. When he asked them where they’d like to go for lunch, they asked if we have a Rudy’s Texas Barbecue here in Colorado Springs — their favorite when they’re on travel. Mr. C. was able to oblige. They went on to explain there is no […]

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Kathryn Steinle’s San Francisco

 

In addition to all of my work with political talk radio, and now, political/opinion writing, I’ve had an equally long career in sports radio. On weekends in the fall, I have a freelance gig, producing national radio broadcasts of NFL games. It’s an amazing side job, and I’ve been able to see most of this beautiful country many times over. Plus, I get paid to watch football. Unbeatable.

This past weekend, I was assigned the Green Bay Packers at the San Francisco 49ers. I was happy to get the assignment, as I had not seen Levi’s Stadium, the new home of the 49ers. I also love visiting San Francisco, as it’s one of the most beautiful cities in America, if not the world, but I stress “visiting.” I could never imagine living in such an anti-freedom, anti-conservative, radically progressive city. I need not detail how bad it is to fellow Ricochet readers. You know.

The Classicist Podcast, with Victor Davis Hanson: “Illegal Immigration and Sanctuary Cities”

 

In this installment of The Classicist podcast from the Hoover Institution, VDH uses the recent murder of Kate Steinle in the sanctuary city of San Francisco to discuss the issues faced by Californians dealing with illegal immigration, address whether ‘compassion’ ought to be the driving factor behind immigration policy, take issue with the idea that rates of criminal behavior are lower amongst those here illegally, explore the popular/elitist divide on the issue, and speculate on whether we’ve reached an inflection point in the public debate.

As ever, you can subscribe to The Classicist via iTunes or your favorite podcast app — or you can listen in below, right after the jump.

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Since clearly not all stories can be national stories some of the more interesting local ones never quite get the traction for a wider audience and end up buried, quickly forgotten. This is one of those stories. The City by the Bay, San Francisco. Famed world wide for its iconic landmarks,  exceedingly liberal politics and […]

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The left gets more surrealistic all the time.  One of its latest ideas is to ban any religion that says anything harsher than “You’re ok!” to anyone–and all in the name of liberty. Much of the left has completely forgotten, but it has some deep roots.  One of them reaches down to John Locke.  Let’s call Locke’s idea […]

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SF Raises Minimum Wage to Zero

 

In November, San Francisco voters decided to raise the minimum wage to $15 an hour. Now one of the law’s biggest supporters is paying the price.

Borderlands Books, a Mission District store specializing in science fiction, opened in 1997. The specialty shop had survived the dot-com boom and bust, the rise of Amazon and e-books, and drastically rising rents in San Francisco. But the city’s progressive policies proved too tough to endure:

What Is Wrong with the Bay Area?

 

4527587396_b44cd17089_zI had no idea the coastal elite cities were this bad. I’ve lived in the San Francisco Bay Area for only a short time (since June), and I’ve already decided to leave early next year for greener pastures. I grew up only a hundred miles east of here near Sacramento, yet the Bay Area is more alien to me than Amsterdam was (where I worked one summer).

I was shocked the other day to read a Brookings Institute report that claims the wages of poor working-class Bay Area residents have fallen $4,000 since 2007:

There are many ways of looking at inequality statistically; one useful way to measure it across places is by using the “95/20 ratio.” This figure represents the income at which a household earns more than 95 percent of all other households, divided by the income at which a household earns more than only 20 percent of all other households. In other words, it represents the distance between a household that just cracks the top 5 percent by income, and one that just falls into the bottom 20 percent. Over the past 35 years, members of the former group have generally experienced rising incomes, while those in the latter group have seen their incomes stagnate…