Tag: sacrifice

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Prince Harry and his new wife, Meghan announced they want to step back from royal duties, move abroad and make their own money. The world loves a love story, especially a successful one. I do. I watched their wedding, his mother, Princess Diana’s wedding, her divorce, and sadly the funeral. I hoped as I watched […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Maybe, Baby

 

If you knew you only had a 1% chance of surviving tomorrow, would you consider that a death sentence? What about 2%, 5%, 10%… at what point would your odds of survival be good enough you wouldn’t feel doomed? And what if you had to purchase your fairly slim chance at survival by risking the life of another? When would you do it? What balance of risk would just barely escape counting as doom?

What if you were the other whose life was risked on the slim hope of avoiding someone else’s death sentence? When would that hope be worth it, and when would it be a forlorn one? How effective must our efforts to lift another’s doom be in order to merit the price?

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This Memorial Day week-end has been especially poignant for me, and I’m not sure of the reasons. The touching posts we’ve seen about history, family and friends have both filled and hurt my heart; they are filled with pride, loss and truth. I’m reading Tom Cotton’s book on The Old Guard and did a post […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Quote of the Day: Sacrificing Virgins to Volcanoes

 

“All around us, humans are not change agents, but victims buffeted by impersonal deities who must be appeased through acts of sacrifice. In principle, there is no distinction between the island barbarian who sacrifices virgins to the volcano and the modern American who self-sterilizes to ‘save the planet.’ Both are expressions of the human desire to suffer in order to appease a larger, all-important ‘force.’ And both are ways in which otherwise intelligent people adopt pagan worldviews in order to come to peace with their place in the world.” — Shaya Cohen (aka @iwe), The Torah Manifesto

The world is filled with people who wear their helplessness, victimization, and virtue-signaling as badges of honor. They have given up their free will as their contribution to the myth that the earth is falling apart and only through their sacrifices can it be saved. Their growing abundance and success, instead of filling them with gratitude and motivation, overwhelm them with guilt and teeth-gnashing. They elevate their impact on the planet so that they end up becoming their own gods, thinking that they can make the world better by giving up those things they have earned and created. Their surrender to true Power is not possible, since they have made themselves into powerless deities.

Instead, they can choose to leave the mythical cave of suffering and safety, and emerge into an existence that feeds their power and creativity, improving the world and serving others.

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Vietnam Veterans

 

(I wrote this story at least 30 years ago. It tells about an incident our family witnessed, and today, according to the Inter-Webs, it is Vietnam Veterans Day. This is entitled “The Honor Guard.”)

It was a time when the unpredictable psycho in a TV drama was always a Vietnam veteran. The Memorial Wall in Washington DC was still new, and still controversial. But some veterans who’d visited The Wall realized that it was also a place of healing, and they knew that others who might never get to the nation’s capital needed the chance to rub their fingers over the names, and see for themselves that the loved ones were not forgotten. A group formed, and they commissioned a 1/3 sized, fiberglass replica of the granite monument. It traveled from town to town, at the request of civic organizations, and when the panels were set up in their V shapes, and the ropes arranged to form a trail leading the public into the area for reverent viewing, people came. By the hundreds, they came, and I did, too.

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When I was a kid growing up in dear old Holy Rosary grade school, Ash Wednesday was a big deal. As was true with all Holy Days of Obligation, we were obliged to show up for morning mass, but afterwards we were free for the day, although we were supposed to spend the day at […]

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