Tag: Richard Nixon

‘Fort Pelosi’ Hits Rock Bottom

 

As an 18-year-old high school graduate a couple of weeks from starting college, I remember holding the microphone from my cassette recorder to my parent’s stereo in our small Oklahoma town to record President Richard Nixon’s August 8 resignation address to the nation.

Afterward, I stepped outside our home’s front door, gazing upward towards the cloudless blue sky on a beautiful summer evening to let the history of that moment settle in. I still have that cassette tape. I can still quote key phrases from the speech from memory. I had just made my first trip to Washington a month earlier, on my way to Canada as part of an International Air Cadet Exchange Program. I’d seen how the final throes of Watergate had gripped the nation’s capital. Tumultuous times.

Watergate’s Eerie Resemblances to Russiagate

 

Most Americans today were not alive when burglars clumsily broke into Democratic National Headquarters at the sprawling Watergate office and apartment complex in northwest Washington, DC on June 17, 1972. We’re coming up to that notorious event’s 50th birthday. The average age in the USA last year was 38.5.

The Watergate complex, Washington DC, along the Potomac River and Rock Creek Parkway circa 1972. Behind is the Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts. The Howard Johnson hotel across from the complex is now a college dorm.

The late Mark Felt, a disgruntled Associate Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, purportedly operating under the nom de guerreDeep Throat,” the title of a porn movie of that era, surreptitiously guided two young Washington Post writers to publishing and movie stardom. Richard Nixon remains the only President in American history to resign from office (August 9, 1974). Dozens of Nixon Administration and campaign officials were prosecuted, including the Attorney General, John Mitchell.

When Tractors Rolled Into Washington DC

 

No one knows exactly how many protesting “freedom convoy” truckers are currently encamped in Canada’s national capital city of Ottawa after an estimated 1,700 big rigs arrived on January 29. Thousands more protestors have joined them on the grounds of Parliament and nearby in support. And the protests appear to be growing.

More than $10 million (CAD) has been raised via GoFundMe.com to support the freedom convoy. That’s about three times more money than the governing Liberal Party raised in the last quarter of 2021. From the freedom convoy fundraising site, which has been “paused” pending a “review,” including grammatical errors and typos.

Member Post

 

We know the FBI protected the violent mafia thug and multiple-murderer Whitey Bulger from prosecution in order to protect him as an intelligence source. We know that FBI informants played the role of instigators in the “Gretchen Whitmer Kidnap Plot” in order to entrap her political opponents. We know the FBI used specious documents to […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Join Ricochet for Free.

More Senate Filibuster Silliness

 

Lefty Law Professors Want VP Harris to Declare the Filibuster “Unconstitutional”

Give the Left its due. They are relentless. Not just progressive election “reformers,” or “critical theory” proponents. But law professors and legislative strategists are on a never-ending quest to eliminate the single biggest barrier to their legislative utopia – the United States Senate’s filibuster rule.

Amity Shlaes discusses the economic history of the 1960s and the efforts of Presidents Johnson and Nixon to eradicate poverty—the subjects of her just-published book, Great Society: A New History.

The 1960s were a momentous period, from the Civil Rights Movement to the Vietnam War, but Shlaes’s book focuses on the incredibly ambitious government programs of the era, which expanded the social safety net beyond anything contemplated before. Overall, the Great Society programs, Shlaes writes, came “close enough to socialism to cause economic tragedy.” Great Society is a powerful follow-up to her earlier book, The Forgotten Man, about the Great Depression and the 1930s.

Richard Epstein reviews how the new film The Post portrays the Supreme Court’s free speech jurisprudence in the Pentagon Papers case.

Member Post

 

40 years ago, Saigon was evacuated. The Vietnam war was over for America. Mr. Rory Kennedy’s documentary shows everyone who wants to see a view of the evacuation–the consequences of US policy & politics. Very little is said about what followed the American evacuation. I suppose everyone on Ricochet already knows: A slaughter of millions, […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Join Ricochet for Free.

Member Post

 

. . . and I’m looking for beta readers. Let me know if you’re interested. It’s called The Devil’s Dictum. If you can’t commit to reading the whole thing, then you can critique just the first 3 chapters. And if you can’t do that, then please give me your reactions to this back-cover blurb: The […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Join Ricochet for Free.

Member Post

 

In the intro to the flagship podcast, we hear Richard Nixon’s famous “I am not a crook” denial, followed by Chris Christie’s “I am not a bully.” These are great examples of how sharing the contents of a politician’s heart can leave voters with the exact opposite of the desired impression. In the immortal words […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Join Ricochet for Free.