Tag: Republicans

How the GOP Can Win Black Votes: Sideline the NAACP

 

A note: I’m using NAACP is a stand-in for itself and every other supposed “civil rights” organization that purports to speak on behalf of the black community, but, in actuality, has cast its own mission and history aside, and is now no more than a fully owned and operated subsidiary of the Democratic National Committee.

Let’s be clear here: any GOP plan involving the NAACP, the Urban League, the Leadership Conference on Civil Rights, the Congressional Black Caucus, etc., or any affiliated individuals (e.g., pastors, community organizers, etc.) in any outreach effort to the black community is not only a waste of time, but a willfully stupid act of self-sabotage. It earns you no goodwill, and it only arms them with extra credibility for when they inevitably turn around to smear you as a racist.

How The GOP Can Win Black Votes: Actually Talk to Black People

 

How should Republicans go about winning over black voters? Most of the articles I’ve seen with similar titles tend to offer a high overarching view of how Republicans should go about winning over more black voters than an actual plan on how to go about it.

What would an actual plan for this look like? How do you put into action? Where do you need to go? Who do you need to see and talk to? What arguments should you push? What pitfalls should you look out for?

Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America cheer Fox News host Neil Cavuto for rebutting President Trump’s claim that “Fox News is no longer working for us” and for reminding politicians and media outlets what the job of the press should be. They also cringe as new Pew poll numbers show 82 percent of Democrats believe abortion should be legal in most or all circumstances – a huge jump from last decade. And Jim has a lot of say after former Canadian Prime Minister Kim Campbell states that she hopes Hurricane Dorian hits Trump’s Mar-a-Lago resort.

Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America celebrate the passage of the Republican border aid bill and pop the popcorn as Nancy Pelosi and AOC butt heads again. They go over last night’s second Democratic presidential debate and the standout performance from Sen. Kamala Harris. And they chuckle at the presence of Marianne Williamson in the Democratic primary.

My Fellow Americans, We Begin Bombing in 5 Minutes

 

The words absolutely scream from the printed pages and the computer screens: An Act of War.

It has come from both Democrats and Republicans, including members of the current Administration. But it is especially popular with those that are consumed with hatred for Donald Trump as they wish to paint him as a traitor to his country and unwilling to confront the Russians over their activities during the 2016 Presidential election cycle.

If we had a serious media, they wouldn’t be parroting these lines but questioning them. No one is asking even the most obvious ones: Do you really believe what you’re saying or is it just convenient rhetoric for the moment? And if you do truly believe, how far are you willing to take it? Are those peddling this narrative willing to accept the reality that the saber-rattling may escalate to a point that one of these two nuclear powers may do something tragically stupid because they may feel that the publicity surrounding an event demands an extraordinary response?

Rob Long of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America applaud President Trump for telling the Russians to get out of Venezuela but worry about what might happen if they don’t.  They also groan as congressional Republicans still don’t have a strategy on health care if Obamacare gets struck down in the courts.  And they ask if even politics is becoming a 1990’s rerun after longtime DNC chairman and former Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe hints he will run in 2020.

Member Post

 

The 2018 midterm election was a sore event for the Republican Party. Losing 39 seats in the House and managing to gain only 2 seats overall–all but one being in deep red states–in the Senate when 26 Senate Democrat seats were up for grabs was a weak electoral showing. Even worse was that this happened during […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Member Post

 

On the eve of the mid-terms, I’m reading a book on my back porch with a glass of wine. Since we “fell back” in daylight savings, dusk comes early, but the Hispanic work crew building the house next door is still hard at work. Among the sounds of drills and nail guns, Spanish ballads lull […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

City Journal’s Brian Anderson and Seth Barron discuss New York’s upcoming elections and the prospect of a state government run entirely by Democrats.

New York’s local politics have long been driven by a partisan split in the state legislature. With the help of moderate Democrats, Republicans have held a narrow majority in the state senate since 2010. This year, however, many of those moderates were beaten in the primaries by more progressive candidates. As a result, Democrats are poised to take over state government in Albany next year.

Republican Campaigning in the Age of Trump

 

Salena Zito’s latest column, “Trump’s not the reason the GOP sputtered in Ohio,” points to continued failure by Republican operatives to accept the message sent by the voters that they must get to the polls in November. Listen to the candidates and the independent PAC ads in your state. How are they doing? It is a mixed bag here in Arizona, so far, but both serious Republican contenders for the US Senate are proclaiming alignment with President Trump.

Salena Zito points to the importance of demonstrating awareness and concern for local issues. Waving around a few national talking points is not a recipe for success.

Member Post

 

There’s been a lot of reflection in 2018 about the year 1968, a half century past.  Generally regarded as one of the most disquieting years in American history, there were assassinations, urban race riots, the ongoing and controversial war in Viet Nam, all the campus protests and unrest, the Democratic National Convention which descended into […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America review Justice Anthony Kennedy’s 30 years on the Supreme Court and anticipate President Trump’s second opportunity to nominate a justice to the nation’s highest court. They then laugh at the hysterics of Chuck Schumer and other Democrats following Kennedy’s retirement. They also look at a report that suggests both Democrats and Republicans tend to stereotype the other side and are wildly inaccurate.

Will we see a big “blue wave” this November that puts Democrats back in control of the US House of Representatives or a more modest action the hurts Republicans but doesn’t end their majority status? David Brady, the Hoover Institution’s Davies Senior Fellow and a Stanford political scientist, assesses the current state of the electorate – and what the recent vote in California says about the odds of the House flipping for a third time in a little over a decade.Will we see a big “blue wave” this November that puts Democrats back in control of the US House of Representatives or a more modest action the hurts Republicans but doesn’t end their majority status? David Brady, the Hoover Institution’s Davies Senior Fellow and a Stanford political scientist, assesses the current state of the electorate – and what the recent vote in California says about the odds of the House flipping for a third time in a little over a decade.

Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America toast better-than-expected unemployment numbers, the best in 18 years.  They also lambaste Virginia Republicans for rolling over and approving the Obamacare Medicaid expansion they claimed to oppose for years.  And they dig through more eye-opening posts from Joy Reid’s supposedly hacked blog, including her likening of John McCain to the Virginia Tech shooter, endorsing the removal of the Israeli government to Europe, and likening illegal immigration to slave labor for multinationals.

In basketball parlance, the fourth and decisive quarter of this year’s election doesn’t commence until after Labor Day. But that doesn’t mean important trends haven’t developed. Hoover senior fellow and renowned pollster Doug Rivers explains what current survey data suggests about the political fortunes of President Trump, Republicans and Democrats.

After discussing an eventful trip to the DMV, Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America are happy to see experts shifting projections towards Republicans in four key House races, with Jim noting that real nominees often fail to poll as well as generic ones.  Jim also rips President Trump for reportedly using cell phones that staffers fear could leave Trump – and classified information – vulnerable to hacking or espionage.  And they blast Obama Education Secretary Arne Duncan for urging parents across the country to stop sending their kids to school until Congress passes gun control legislation.

Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America are encouraged that six months before the midterms, DNC Vice Chairman Keith Ellison is promising that people will die if Democrats don’t win.  It’s an indication that Democrats don’t have much of an agenda to run on other than fear and opposing President Trump.  They also throw up their hands as congressional Republicans reportedly have no plans to try to pass a budget this year because it will be really hard to pass in the Senate.  They react to Sean Hannity being named as one of Michael Cohen’s clients, and while there may be no legal scandal, Hannity is definitely wrong to have not disclosed this connection.  And Jim has some theories about the man in the sketch released by Stormy Daniels.

The coming midterm election is more than a litmus test of the Trump presidency. It’s also a continuation of a fourth cycle of political polarization dating back to the Civil War. David Brady, the Hoover Institution’s Davies Family Senior Fellow, explains the sorting-out in the election – a possible surge in women voters, Trump loyalists’ enthusiasm, and the two parties dealing with their respective ideological differences in elections nationwide.

How’s the Trump presidency faring and what’s its effect on “Victorian Reagan conservatives” and the political chattering class? Hugh Hewitt, a conservative talk-radio and MSNBC host (not to mention the recipient of several Trump barbs as a 2016 GOP debate host), weighs in on the good, the bad and the ugly of Trump’s reign.

Donald Trump’s rallies with the Rolling Stone’s “You Can’t Always Get What You Want, But If You Try Sometimes, You Get What You Need.” Is that the prevailing conservative attitude 14 months into his presidency? Rich Lowry, editor of The National Review, discusses the right’s complicated relationship with a President who both delivers for and confounds the Republican base, but do they get what they need?

Did you like the show? Please rate, review, and subscribe!