Tag: Republican Party

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“Could you believe those things,” said one Republican Congressman to two of his colleagues, complaining about the size of his steak at a fundraiser the night before. Waiting in the Longworth House Office Building cafeteria to catch up with friends the day after the Trump-Ryan sit-down, as I read over Peggy Noonan’s latest column, that […]

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Farewell, GOP

 

Voter-RegistrationI joined the GOP when I turned 18, just weeks after Ronald Reagan’s re-election. Since I was unable to vote in that race, I accompanied one of my conservative friends to the polling place as a kind of silent vote. I had become a big Reagan fan in high school and began learning more about conservatism through Goldwater, various books on the Cold War, and National Review. (That made me quite the hit with the ladies, as you might imagine.)

These early studies of policy, patriotism, and civic virtue led me to enlist in the US Navy and, once I got to college, challenge my ex-hippie professors. For years I voted along party lines, donated to Republican candidates, and volunteered for their campaigns. I was proud to belong to the party of Abraham Lincoln, Calvin Coolidge, and, of course, Ronaldus Magnus. Even when Bush Sr. raised taxes, some GOP congressman floated bizarre conspiracy theories about Clinton, and Tom DeLay’s House spent us into oblivion, I still identified with the party’s higher ideals. Limited government. Peace through strength. Personal freedom.

Nominees like Bob Dole, John McCain, and Mitt Romney were all way down on my list of preferred primary candidates. (Both Bushes were as well, come to think of it.) But considering the odious Democrats running against them, I voted for the half-a-loaf GOP standard bearer.

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How would you have voted in your state’s primary election if you knew the final choice would be between Cruz and Trump?  The GOP shot itself in the foot yet again. Through its foolish and unjust system of staggered primaries, it not only refuses voters in later states the opportunity to vote for a full […]

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The Republican Party Civil War The glory and horror of Civil War. The slaughter of individuals you once called brothers or sisters. The hatred and/or rage against your fellow citizens of what was once a whole group you had all belonged to. Where once was love, love is no more. The stench of death is […]

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An Open Letter to Republicans

 

shutterstock_69030448For as long as I’ve been eligible to vote, I’ve been registered as a Republican. Through highs and lows (and more lows), I have maintained that party registration, even as my political and philosophical leanings have brought me from conservatism to libertarianism. In theory, the Republican Party was the conservative party and, to me, there was enough of an overlap in the Venn diagram between conservatives and libertarians to allow me to stay. I stuck around because I believed that there was a space for me in the Republican Party. And there was: Libertarians were a small part of the party, but an accepted part nonetheless.

Last night, that all changed. After Donald Trump’s victory in Indiana and Senator Ted Cruz’s withdrawal from the race, it’s clear that Trump will be the Republican nominee. And so, last night, I filled out the form to change my party registration.

I feel there is no longer room for me in the Republican Party. It is no longer even nominally a conservative party. During this primary season, record numbers of Republicans have turned out to endorse Donald Trump. I don’t know what the hell Trumpism is (well, I have some idea), but I don’t want any part of it. It’s not conservatism and it is utterly at odds with the values of individual liberty that I hold dear. Not only is there no overlap between Trumpism and libertarianism, the two are irreconcilable.

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Speaking at Stanford today, former Congressman and Speaker of the House Boehner described Senator Cruz as “Lucifer in the flesh,” the former Speaker said. “I have Democrat friends and Republican friends. I get along with almost everyone, but I have never worked with a more miserable son of a bitch in my life.” … “Throughout […]

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Mitt Romney endorses Ted Cruz: Former presidential candidate Mitt Romney will vote for Texas Senator Ted Cruz, saying he is “repulsed” by Republican front-runner Donald Trump. Mr Romney said in a Facebook post that the only way to nominate a Republican is to have an open convention, in which party officials choose the nominee. Preview […]

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When the New Lines are Drawn, Don’t Abandon the Social Conservatives

 
M4l2004

Transferred from en.wikipedia to Commons by IngerAlHaosului using CommonsHelper., GPL.

This election cycle has exposed growing divisions in both political parties. It’s almost an assumption at this point that the GOP is heading for an inevitable disintegration, and there’s reason to believe the Democrats might not be far behind. Either way, the victories of Trump and Sanders are seen as indicators of the desire by many voters to upend the status quo. I’ll agree that plenty in the status could use some un-quoing, but whether things get better or worse depends entirely on where the new lines are drawn.

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Donald Trump came to power on what some have called a righteous anger against the status quo in many areas of American Politics. At the same time some have also stated they believe he will retain the status quo in many areas of American Politics also. Trump’s ambiguous statements have only further enabled this conflict of […]

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I have always delighted in Uncommon Knowledge (or at least whatever I could find online since I learned of the show when I was a senior in highschool; I would watch a couple old episodes every night till I caught up to the latest ones) and today I found another episode with Ben Sasse. Preview […]

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The Power of the Purse

 

1280px-Sleeping_asian_elephantLast week, Mona Charen published a post on Ricochet, defending the Republican establishment. She began by observing that “The Republican Party is choosing an odd time to commit suicide,” and she rightly drew attention to the fact that “in the Obama era the Democrats lost 13 US Senate seats, 69 House seats, 910 legislative seats, 11 governorships, and 30 legislative chambers.” The only thing that “stood between Republicans and real reform at the federal level was the White House,” she observed, “and the Democrats were sleepwalking toward nominating the least popular major player in American politics.” Then, she rightly noted that the Republicans had “managed to find someone who is even less acceptable,” and she added a few choice words about Donald Trump – all of them, alas, plausible, but (and this may turn out to be important down the road) not all of them, as they pertain to the future, certain.

For the most part, I share Mona’s misgivings. I have followed Donald Trump in the tabloids for decades, and I am no admirer of the man. But I think her analysis of the situation that catapulted him into prominence unsound. Here is what she had to say:

And what sin has brought down this despoiler upon the Republican Party? Why are so many self-styled conservatives complacent about his success? Failure to stop Obamacare? Please. That was never possible with Obama in office. It would have been possible, in fact it was probable, that it would have been replaced if Republicans held majorities in Congress and got an agreeable executive. Now? No. Failure to get control of the border? Illegal immigration from Mexico has slowed to a trickle and, in fact, more Mexicans are now leaving than coming. Failure to defund the Export-Import Bank? Yes, crony capitalism is disgraceful, but . . .

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Back on March 2, 2016, Hugh Hewitt interviewed the president of Hillsdale College, Dr. Larry Arnn, about the Donald Trump candidacy. The segment was released in podcast form as part of the Hillsdale Dialogues Podcast. You can also listen to it online here in streaming format. Go ahead and give it a listen. Arnn has […]

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Samuel Francis and Middle American Radicalism

 

protectionvsfreetrade-554x330In the March 1996 issue of Chronicles: A Magazine of American Culture, the late Samuel Francis (1947-2005) published an essay titled “From Household to Nation: The Middle American Populism of Pat Buchanan.” Francis wrote about Buchanan’s then-ongoing campaign for the 1996 Republican presidential nomination, framing it within the larger historical context of American conservatism and populism. He noted that the campaign had proved, up to that point, more viable and enduring than many political prognosticators expected. Francis observed:

… the courtiers and professional partisans miss the larger victory the Buchanan campaign is on the eve of winning. If Buchanan loses the nomination, it will be because his time has not yet come, but the social and political forces on which both his campaigns [1992 and 1996] have been based will not disappear, and even if he does lose, he will have won a place in history as an architect of the victory those forces will eventually build.

Francis saw Buchanan and his quixotic campaigns as the vanguard of a larger, emerging sociopolitical movement:

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I just had a thought today that put together two things that I hadn’t put together before:  1. The “sudden” pouring out of the anger at the establishment just when it seemed we had a slate of candidates that were far superior to the previous 5 or 6 Presidential election cycles.  Preview Open

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Narratives are more or less an explanation. They allegedly provide the listener or reader of the story (narrative) with descriptions of what happened in the event or string of events and then provide that reader with prescriptive measure on how to repeat or avoid (change) certain inputs in order to get the desired output(s). In […]

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I have been a vocal supporter of a third party in the instance that Donald Trump wins the nomination, and many people here have come to my side. However, I have noticed that many of these people have been more worried about what the name of this new party will be than what will be […]

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What was it Gandhi said? First, they ignore you. Then, they laugh at you. Then, they fight you, Then, you win? The GOP ignored Trump when he entered the race. Then, they laughed at him after every debate declaring his candidacy “over.” Now that it’s late in the game, they’re fighting him the way the […]

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What Do You Make of This? Chris Christie Endorses Donald Trump.

 

Christie-Trump

I have long been suspicious of Chris Christie. In his years as governor, as far as I can tell, he has done nothing for the New Jersey Republican Party, which is as moribund today as it was when he was first elected (if not more so). In 2012, at the moment which counted most, he ostentatiously embraced Barack Obama, and that may have decided what looked a week earlier like a very close race.

So when I see that he has endorsed Donald Trump, I ask myself the only question that seems plausible. What might be in it for Christie? The vice presidential nomination? A court appointment? Membership in the cabinet?

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It might be too early to say the nominating process is over, but it also might not be. So, what have we learned over the past few months? 1. The Republican Party Is More Democratic Than the Democratic Party — The Democratic Party is purposefully structured to prevent a Donald Trump-like insurgent candidate from emerging. […]

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