Tag: Religion

Member Post

 

A question that has occupied me some of late is ‘what is the meaning and the role of the individual person in this life, socially, politically, and religiously on Earth and what does it mean for Christians following the Resurrection?’. Here are some points that have entered my thoughts on this:      My understanding […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Member Post

 

 “And the secret of human life, the universal secret, the root secret from which all other secrets spring, is the longing for more life, the furious and insatiable desire to be everything else without ever ceasing to be ourselves, to take possession of the entire universe without letting the universe take possession of us and […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Member Post

 

Good Afternoon! Next on Thinking It Through with Jerome Danner (Podcast):  My next guest is Bethany Mandel, a stay-at-home mother of 3 children, a freelance writer on politics and culture, a Senior Contributor at The Federalist, amongst other publications, such as the Forward and First Things.  She also just so happens to be on The LadyBrains Podcast.  I invited her to […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Youth Minister Caught in Compromising Position

 

Maryville, TN — A newly-hired youth minister found, not his credentials, but his faith questioned when it was revealed he could not actually play guitar.

While Drew Campbell, youth minister at Grace Grove Bible Church, was preparing gear for the teen Seekers’ annual spring-break camping retreat, he was discovered in the church basement awkwardly fondling a guitar, muttering to himself, “So, how do you play this thing?”

Member Post

 

Last night I watched Calvary (2014), a very interesting film about an Irish priest who is told in a confessional by a child abuse victim (who we don’t see) that the victim is going to kill him, though he knows this particular priest is a decent man who had nothing to do with the abuse the […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

The Roads Not Taken

 

Life is about making choices. Lots of choices. Most of them are minor ones: what to cook for dinner, what book to read next, whether to take a walk. But some of our choices are significant, and they call to us to take notice of them. We can try to ignore them, but I think that G-d walks around with a two-by-four (or sends a guardian angel to do the work) and gives us a good solid whack to help us pay attention and step up. That usually gets my attention, and I try to discern what is calling to me.

I don’t spend much time reflecting on the past and the choices I’ve made. Like most people, I celebrate the rewarding outcomes and complain about the poor ones. But once the decision is made, and life moves forward, I rarely think about whether I made good or bad or smart or stupid choices, because all of those choices have brought me to this incredible, blessed moment. Yet recently I decided to spend time reflecting on my life’s decisions without judging or evaluating them; I thought I might be able to learn from them.

I focused on four major decisions in my life, since over time they have had the greatest impact. Those decisions had to do with the man I married, our decision about not having children, my commitment to friends, and my Jewish faith. I looked at each topic as dispassionately as I could, although it wasn’t easy. So many emotions, anxieties and conflicts were attached to each one that I was convinced I simply couldn’t be objective. I could shine a light on the past, knowing that shadows and sadness, as well as joy and passion would distort my view. I decided to examine these choices anyway.

Member Post

 

Last week Gallup released a poll of religiosity. They ranked the states by the percentage of respondents that they deemed to be “very religious.”  Also, Pew Research Center released a new religious attitudes survey.  The “Religion Guy” Richard Ostling looked over the polls and wrote up his recommendations to the National Democratic Committee on how […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Member Post

 

He stood there, if it could be called standing, and surveyed the horizon. Pristine. The sunlight warmed his face and every exposed surface – radiating layers of warmth to various degrees even beneath the superficial layers of the earth. Oxygen atoms danced through the air like children newly released to a playground, unconstrained, in absolutely […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Member Post

 

On the matter of whether I need to feel guilty when disposing of garbage in plastic bags, my intuitive reaction is a resounding “no.” But why? My imagination is as open as the next fellow’s. I can see in my mind’s eye the garbage truck and its massive pile of billowing polymers, and the landfill […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

On My Failure to Snark

 

Every so often, I remind my faithful reader (that’s my lovely wife; hi, honey!) that I spend time on Facebook. As most know, Facebook has devolved from a way to keep tabs on friends and family and their daily activities — accompanied by pictures of what they are eating — to a storm of political posts from whatever news source the poster happens to prefer. Even though I have many friends on the opposite side of the aisle, I’ve yet to defriend anyone from my list. I even read a lot of what they post.

One post that recently struck me was posted by a young woman from a church I was a part of in Oregon. For a while, we were in the same Bible study group. Just recently, she had her first baby, about a month before my wonderful son was born. So I’ve been following her, watching the progress of new mom and baby. Of course, she’s politically motivated on the opposite side of the aisle. Below, is a full quote from a post she made (note, it is a bit long):

Religion as well as political views are some of the most sensitive topics you can address with other individuals as most people hold a lot of emotion behind the two. For this reason I do not usually openly share my political views, especially on a social media outlets, but these points are too real not to share… do yourself and your country a favor and educate yourself.

Member Post

 

It’s been a while since I’ve posted. This one is an attempt to explain how the mainstream press’s ignorance and poor coverage of religious issues, particularly for evangelicals, results in the propagation of fake news online.  Also it’s a shameless love letter to Terry Mattingly and a plug to follow his and his contributors’ tireless […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Member Post

 

“He felt that his whole life was some kind of dream and he sometimes wondered whose it was and whether they were enjoying it.” “Curiously enough, the only thing that went through the mind of the bowl of petunias as it fell was Oh no, not again. Many people have speculated that if we knew […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Member Post

 

The question of allegiances came up regarding Muslims, as part of @docjay’s post  on Sharia and Islam. One person made the comment that if we needed to screen Muslim residents at some point, it would be important to know whether they considered themselves to be Muslims first or Americans first. This suggestion was made in […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Member Post

 

Do you like the dark? Is it pleasantly spooky? Do you find all sorts of activities – swimming, hiking, skiing – more adventurous by night? (Cross-country skiing is wayyyy more affordable than downhill, but less thrilling – a nighttime cross-country jaunt reintroduces some of the thrill, if only because you can’t see so well where […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Member Post

 

When Jesus the Christ was born, he was smaller than you. He was weaker than you. He couldn’t feed himself. He couldn’t clean himself. He couldn’t even find his own blanket to get warm. Yet this tiny, fragile baby was “the king of kings.” He was our promised savior. He was the son of God […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Member Post

 

From President George Washington to President Abraham Lincoln, America’s forefathers used to speak of Providence. More than mere acknowledgement of a divine Creator, this reference hearkened to an active Mover of history. Until only recently, most Christians in the West understood that God is not a “divine watchmaker” (winding up His invention to then leave […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Member Post

 

One of my Rico-friends asked me this question recently. Then, no more than a day or two later, a flesh-and-blood friend made the same enquiry, and in more or less the same, slightly weirded-out spirit. “You sound so normal,” goes the subtext. “It doesn’t make sense that you are…you know…religious.” Preview Open

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

The Science of the Gaps

 

book-sand-smallThe tension between religion and science, at a sociological level, does not exist. There are plenty of religious scientists and scientific believers, and they do not walk around all day clutching their foreheads trying to relieve the pressure of intense cognitive dissonance. On the contrary, the obvious point that there cannot be two contradictory truths denotes an agreeable and elegant unity between the two approaches, whether one views them as a tightly intersected Venn diagram or as non-overlapping magisteria that deal with separate but equally-valid truths.

All is not as peaceful as it first appears, however. With the decline of popular religious feeling and the ascendance of popular science, many religious people have come to view the claims of religion – and indeed, everything else – in a scientific light. It is not so much that there is science and there is religion and they are both avenues to the truth(s), but rather that science is all knowledge but religion can exist comfortably as its subset, as the rational belief in the irrational or whatever.

This may sound like a crazy claim to most religious people, but I beg you to consider: In the subconscious of many a religious believer today floats the notion that one day scientific knowledge will advance to the extent that we will no longer “need” G-d to explain anything. Now, this idea can be defended theologically, and often is. Someone is always quick to declare that G-d created brains and science that we may use them. Other will chime in with the more mystical claim that G-d loves us so much he wants to set us free and never see us again, like any good modern parent, and that human history and the enlightenment is humanity’s opportunity to “move out of the house.” Even more open-minded (and my favorite) is the idea that “using” G-d as an explanation for anything in our world is to make of the deity an instrument, a terrible degradation that should embarrass any mature believer! G-d, like true art, can have no purpose!

Member Post

 

 Abandoned buildings in Detroit Four years ago, someone predicted an all out attack on the Church. He traveled to Greece to show the fallout from anarchists, economic instability, battles between law enforcement and inner city residents, a raging heroin epidemic, and it reminded me of our inner city problems today. He predicted many times the eruption of […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.