Tag: Religion

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. How My Political Views Helped Me Grow Spiritually

 

I think most politically involved Christians would say that their politics are influenced by their faith. This is true for me, as well; however, I’ve realized recently that the opposite is also true: my growing political views have actually helped me to grow as a Christian.

Even from childhood, I’ve often been a judgmental Christian. I have a history of being hard on myself and others. I remember being very upset with my parents one Sunday because we weren’t going to go back to church for the evening service; weren’t we supposed to be there every time the doors were open? I also nearly broke down in tears once because my sister was talking about buying a two-piece bathing suit.

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. How Many Polar Bears Can Dance on the Tip of an Iceberg?

 
Photo Credit: Alan D. Wilson, October 2007, Polar Bears (Cubs), Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska.

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez is acting as the face for the Justice Democrats’ Green New Deal, Dianne Feinstein is confronted by terror-stricken children and their indoctrination handlers, women in first world countries are declaring that they will forgo child-bearing in the face of impending environmental collapse, Mayor DeBlasio is mandating “Meatless Monday” menus in NYC public schools in order to combat Climate Change… Wherever you turn, the Left have whipped up their Eco-Marxist rhetoric to an absolute froth. And I, for one, have had enough.

Admittedly, the Global Warming / Climate Change sham has been stuck in my craw since 2008 when I read the 2006 Monnet and Gleason paper “Observations of mortality associated with extended open-water swimming by polar bears in the Alaskan Beaufort Sea.” This is the paper that Al Gore was most likely citing in his 2006 traveling eco-apocalypse road show “An Inconvenient Truth” when he claimed that, “a new scientific study shows that, for the first time, they’re finding polar bears that have actually drowned…” On reading the Monnett and Gleason paper, even as a layperson, I found the study’s methodology, and therefore Gore’s conclusions on the study, to be highly suspect:

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Nation’s Music Ministers Yet Again Downcast When Jesus’ Wondrous Love Fails to Lift Dreadful Curse of Daylight Saving Time

 

The classic American hymn “Wondrous Love,” first published in 1811 during the second Great Awakening, proclaims, “What wondrous love is this, / That caused the Lord of bliss / To bear the dreadful curse / For my soul.” The nation’s music ministers awoke this morning once more disappointed to discover that the dreadful curse Jesus bears for us so we don’t have to doesn’t include Daylight Saving Time.

“‘Wondrous Love’ is a great Lenten hymn,” mumbled Elmer Morgan, organist at Parkhurst Methodist, over his fourth cup of coffee, “So it’s always disheartening to realize Lent after Lent that Jesus’ wondrous love doesn’t extend to lifting the curse of Daylight Saving Time from our souls.” Down the street at Spiritstone Reformed, the worship band reportedly slammed multiple energy drinks before the main service, noting forlornly that no outpouring of the Holy Spirit had made up for that one lost hour of sleep. Only bassist Chas Tietze abstained from energy-drink consumption, “But that’s only because,” drummer Mark Lorenzo observed, “He can play these sets in his sleep, and frequently does.”

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This is part of an ongoing series. You can read the first part here. For a long time people have thought the greatest of all rivals to Nationalism is Imperialism. But was it really? Instead of a being a rival Imperialism for most of history was more of a manager and transformer of Nationalism not […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. The Demise of Moral Relativism – and Its Consequences

 

The claims of moral relativism have been the bane of modern society as it has risen in popularity. Its origins started centuries ago, but as Progressivism has continued to dominate the Democrat party, it has paradoxically forecast its own death — and deadly consequences for American society. How has that happened and where will it lead us?

So that we’re all on the same page, let me provide a definition of moral relativism. Here’s one:

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Member Post

 

[This quotation speaks to the differences between the British (1640) and American Revolutions, compared to the French (1789) and Russian (1917) Revolutions] The difference was that the British and American revolutions, led by the Puritans, were inspired by the Hebrew Bible. The French and Russian revolutions were inspired by philosophy. Rousseau’s in the first, Karl […]

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We’ve all heard people criticize the church or Christians or evangelicals (from within or without) for choosing Trump—but whatever his merits or demerits, Trump was not the choice of Christians. Peter Beinart in the Atlantic: More

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I recently read the book “Decision Making and the Will of God (25th Anniversary Edition)” by Garry Friesen. I enjoyed this book very much and I think that it is an important book that all Christians should read. Here is a summary of a few of the major points made in the book, and my thoughts […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Racism Is Alive and Well

 

Saying that black Americans can’t be racist because they are an oppressed group has never been acceptable to me. You only need to look at the history of the Black Hebrew Israelites to realize that racism against white people not only exists, but it is overt, ugly and frightening. This is the group that harassed the teenagers at the March for Life.

Glenn Beck did some research on the Black Hebrew Israelites group:

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Ave Maria: Venerating the Brave Virgin, and her Consent

 

Warning: Including some crass humor in the description of a Great Christian Mystery is intended to drive home just how extraordinary a woman Mary must have been, as well as the extraordinary — indeed quite odd — nature of the mystery involved.

Ave Maria, gratia plena… Hail Mary, full of grace… These words, whether set to the sumptuous music of Biebl’s much-beloved one-hit wonder, sung to another tune, or simply spoken, will ring out through many a church today, the last Sunday of Advent, the last caravanserai parishioners pause at before reaching Bethlehem itself, and the Word Made Flesh.

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Member Post

 

For some Jews, the Passover or Pesach holiday in the Spring is one of the most treasured of all the Jewish holidays. The celebration of G-d’s freeing the Jews from the Egyptians is called “seder,” which means “order.” In part, the name suggests that a particular order is followed for this meal at this auspicious […]

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I am currently reading Jonah Goldberg’s “Suicide of the West” and Patrick Deneen’s “Why Liberalism Failed” for a doctoral class. Finding myself about halfway through the former I had the following review retweeted into my timeline this morning and it held exactly the critique of Goldberg’s thesis that was digging at me. I want to […]

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Once again, a lot of time, effort, and money has been spent trying to resolve an issue which shouldn’t be an issue in the first place: http://www.foxnews.com/opinion/2018/08/31/todd-starnes-texas-cheerleaders-win-victory-for-freedom-religious-expression-praise-lord.html More

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. I’m Not Catholic – So Why Should It Matter to Me?

 

My personal spiritual journey had more hiccups than a newborn. While my family, with traditional ties to Catholicism, was influential in planting a Christian seed, growing up in the crazy ’60s, ’70s, ’80s made anything traditional not my bag. By the third grade, my dad bought me a little turntable that resembled a red suitcase and several Beatles albums (along with Alvin and the Chipmunks) – my first intro to rock and roll – and then as I got older, cough … all the rest…

I considered myself a “modern” Christian, i.e., more spiritual than religious, and fell down every spiritual rabbit hole there was. I read about Eastern religions, New Age, visited multiple denominational churches, but was never that committed. As I grew older, I realized I didn’t really have a spiritual foundation. In my case, it took a health crisis to realize I had nothing. The “Universe” wasn’t going to save me, nor the Buddha, or any other spiritual “wisdom” I gleaned from all those cool New Age bookstores, with the ear candles, patchouli and rose incense, and sections on whatever spiritual flavor of the day caught your attention.

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One topic that is being talked about often among the intellectual dark web is the relationship between religion and morality. Ben Shapiro argues that non-religious morality can only be developed to a limited extent. Sam Harris argues that we can derive our morality without reference to a deity or a Holy book. The discussion of […]

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What is Oregon Governor Kate Brown talking about here? Most of us probably struggle to convey our religious beliefs but she almost sounds like she has never given it any thought. Giving some rambling response about spirits and yoga when asked about your religious beliefs is…quite Portland. Brown seems, for some reason, unwilling to acknowledge […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Suckers for Jesus! Or, Holy Kitsch!

 

I can’t call it “only in America,” because kitschy and silly, though harmless, religious trinkets seem to be a universal phenomenon. Still, there is something endearingly American about this online Christian storefront, selling Testamints, crucifix-shaped lollies, gourmet Scripture suckers, chocolate tulips (must be for the Calvinists), and little gummy Jesus “footsteps”: show that you walk in His footsteps by eating His feet!

“Take and eat… do this in remembrance of me.” In a religion based on the Eucharist, I suppose it’s not exactly blasphemous to consume Jesus in gummy form, though I doubt my grandmother would have agreed: she would have seen candy shaped like all or any part of Jesus as blasphemously irreverent, even if abstract religious symbols were commonplace in eats where she came from. Part of the wider Christian culture in America is to downplay aesthetic differences: high church or low, contemporary or old-fashioned, why argue adiaphora, huh? At the same time, aesthetics go to the heart of worship: whatever we think “worship the Lord in the beauty of holiness” means, it only seems fitting to give of our best (whatever that is) in acts of reverence. Religious kitsch occupies a funny place, not just strange, but amusing — and not just amusing to snobs who wish to disdain the rubes. The Babylon Bee, a favorite site of many of us here, often pokes fun at Christian kitsch, and it could hardly be said to disdain American Christians: it pokes fun at the kitsch because it’s run by American Christians.

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There is a lot of justifiable concern about Islam in the United Kingdom and other western democracies. Terror attacks, no-go areas and restrictions on speech are concerns of lots of people. Douglas Murray has recently wrote a book (I have not read it at the time of this writing) titled, “The Strange Death of Europe.” […]

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William F. Buckley Jr. was a strong Catholic and probably the most influential conservative of his generation. Recently, Dennis Prager wrote a column titled, Conservatives, too, undergo secular indoctrination. In that column Prager wrote in American terms, the American conservative I most admired, William F. Buckley Jr., the founder and publisher of National Review, was […]

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“We have no government armed with power capable of contending with human passions unbridled by morality and religion. Our Constitution was made only for a moral and religious people. It is wholly inadequate to the government of any other.” ~John Adams – 2nd President of the United States, 1st Vice President, and assisted in drafting […]

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