Tag: Religion

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Harvard Gives the Devil More Than His Due

 

VeritasShieldTonight, Harvard University will host a “black mass” at Queens Head Pub, a space beneath Memorial Hall usually reserved for hangouts over pints of 1636 Ale. The Harvard Extension School’s “Cultural Studies Club” has decided to put on an “historical reenactment” of Satanic worship, purportedly only simulating the desecration of a consecrated host. It is unclear exactly what the “reenactment” involves, but, as a mockery of the Holy Mass, it is unavoidably an affront to Catholicism and every Catholic in the Harvard and Cambridge communities. If a consecrated host is used (and despite administrators’ assurances it will not be, it is difficult to say for sure), this would be an extremely grave and troubling event for Catholics anywhere. It would be, quite literally, a physical assault on Jesus Christ.

Despite the fact that the event comes precariously close to an horrific offense against God, it is hard to take these Harvard Satanists too seriously. The “Extension School” is just what is sounds like — an entity far from the heart of the Harvard community, originally designed to give locals around campus a chance to attend classes. It is absurd that a group of a few Extension School students have been allowed to represent “Harvard” as an institution here. Also, the event will feature a talk by Harvard Kennedy School lecturer (not professor), Christopher Robichaud. If you’re interested in writings by Robichaud, you’ll only find him published in volumes of Superheroes and Philosophy, Supervillains and Philosophy, Superman and Philosophy, Batman and Philosophy, Iron Man and Philosophy, X-Men and Philosophy, and Game of Thrones and Philosophy. Comical indeed. Satanic worship may be the least of our worries when it comes to the Father of Lies, who is at his strongest when he tempts souls by an almost imperceptible influence, not by agents wearing spooky masks while they attempt to vivify gargoyles. 

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. SCOTUS Decision on Legislative Prayer Doesn’t Go Far Enough—Adam Freedman

 

Yesterday was a good day for religious liberty at the Supreme Court, where five justices beat back an attempt to declare prayers at town meetings unconstitutional. It could have been a great day, however, if only the Court had accepted Justice Thomas’ invitation to declare the Establishment Clause completely inapplicable to state and local governments. But I’ll get to that in a minute.

The decision in Town of Greece v Galloway involved a small city in upstate New York (Greece) in which town board meetings open with a roll call, a recitation of the Pledge of Allegiance, and – brace yourself – a prayer given by a rotating selection of local clergymen. Two town residents sued, arguing that the predominately Christian nature of the prayers (reflecting the composition of the local clergy) violated the First Amendment’s Establishment Clause. The Court’s liberal bloc (Breyer, Ginsburg, Sotomayor, and Kagan) would have banned the town’s prayer tradition, relying on a dominant theory in many earlier cases that the First Amendment prohibits any government action that might appear to “endorse” religion. 

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For at least a thousand years, a popular premise of epic adventure stories has been a quest for the Holy Grail. In a roundabout way, Monty Python demonstrates why such a quest might seem a little silly. More

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Promoted from the Ricochet Member Feed by Editors Created with Sketch. Worship or American Idol-atry? — Jon Gabriel

 

My wife and I have dragged our daughters to many churches over the past several years. We’ve enjoyed most of the sermons, congregations, programs and pastors, and my wife has liked most of the music. As for me, I’ve pretty much given up on finding any worship music that doesn’t drive me a bit batty.

For background, I’m a plain-old Christian, sans denomination, though I have enjoyed Lutheran, Baptist, Anglican, Reformed and other congregations over the years. Most of the churches I’ve attended are evangelical, with several that would fit into the “megachurch” category. Most have offered inspiring teaching with solid, if not terribly deep, theology. But the music… oh heavens, the music.

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Christmas and Easter are bookends of God’s covenant fulfilled. By the first, He shocked and transformed us by becoming Man. The Messiah came not as a powerful king in glory but as a defenseless babe in poverty. We expected to be humbled, but instead God humbled Himself so that we may know Him and love […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. All Liberals Go to Heaven — Frank Soto

 

Just to be clear, former New York City mayor Michael Bloomberg doesn’t believe in your God or heaven. But if you happen to be right about their existence, he is quite certain he’s in.

“I am telling you if there is a God, when I get to heaven I’m not stopping to be interviewed. I am heading straight in. I have earned my place in heaven. It’s not even close.”

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. The Hope of the Poor? Business — Peter Robinson

 

From an address that the theologian and philosopher Michael Novak delivered this past January at an event marking the first anniversary of the business school at Catholic University (I’m late coming to these remarks, but they’re so splendid I’m determined to post them all the same):

The business vocation is the main support of the multitude of institutions of civil society – the main support of private universities, cancer clinics, soup kitchens, symphonies, hospitals for the poor, sports activities both in neighborhoods and in major cities, service organizations such as Lions Clubs, the Rotary, Kiwanis, the Elks, the support of religious activities without number. Without business corporations, there would be no great power standing between associations of citizens and the Leviathan of the administrative state. Without business, there would be only a very weak private sector indeed….

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Promoted from the Ricochet Member Feed by Editors Created with Sketch. Catholic College Pulls a Mozilla

 

By all accounts, Sister Jane Dominic Laurel is an accomplished theologian and teacher. She is a graduate of the Pontifical University of St. Thomas Aquinas in Rome, a university under the direct authority of the Holy See. Sister Laurel has been on the faculty of Aquinas College in Nashville, Tennessee, for some time, and is a widely respected theologian, particularly in Pope John Paul II’s theology of the body. Sister’s website features a number of free video courses on family and sexuality. In those presentations Sister is kind, prayerful, and patient. She is obviously an excellent scholar and teacher.

But woe to Sister Laurel. She has crossed swords with what Michael Voris calls the “Church of Nice,” and a firestorm has erupted.

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A ceremony of my church includes this passage: “The union of husband and wife in heart, body, and mind is intended by God for their mutual joy, for the help and comfort given one another in prosperity and adversity, and, when it is God’s will, for the procreation of children and their nurture in the knowledge […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Give It Up for Lent — Jeffrey Earl Warren

 

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It was not long ago I mentioned in another post that one of the primary problems of the modern church in America was that it leaned far too much towards the emotive. I didn’t elaborate at that time as it was an entirely different topic and I didn’t want to derail a discussion any more […]

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Promoted from the Ricochet Member Feed by Editors Created with Sketch. Am I The Only Person Who Doesn’t Care About the Noah Movie? — Tabula Rasa

 

Some things are best left to one’s imagination. That’s how I feel about most biblical “epics.”

That’s also why the new movie about Noah fails to engage my interest, even though I like its cast. My unwillingness to get excited about the movie is totally aside from the arguments that God is strangely left out, or that it is basically an environmental screed, or that its special effects are the main character. 

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. A Good Man is Hard to Find: HBO’s “True Detective” (Spoilers) — Louis Beckett

 

After eight chapters of suspense in HBO’s True Detective — the quest to track down “The Yellow King” that spanned an uncharted bayou of evil — the show’s greatest surprise had nothing to do with crime-solving. It came when Rust (Matthew McConaughey), a devout nihilist throughout the series, admitted to Marty (Woody Harrelson) that, amid so much darkness, “the light’s winning.”

Despite the shocking displays of unspeakable horrors committed by the show’s killer, viewers were most shocked by that moment of grace capping the finale. NPR’s critic called it “hooey.” Two separate New Yorker reviewers skewered the ending, suggesting that the show’s popularity (demand for the finale crashed HBO GO) had just been a spell of delusion by the audience. A friend, similarly appalled by the conclusion, wrote to me during the credits: “Give me a break.”

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Member Post

 

When 10 cents asked what made me happy, I began a series of posts on my favorite Lenten music. The move to 2.0 has disrupted those posts, but today, the Feast of the Annunciation, is the perfect day to resume. And I thought I’d do something a little different this time: post music that is […]

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“That is the defining question of what Christianity is about… Either he is the Son of God… or he was nuts.” http://www.show2.me/en/video/bono-who-jesus?ep=znURZNZPZPxZN More

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Science Confirms Judeo-Christian Worldview, Or, Dalai Lama, Call Your Office

 

One of the most basic observations of comparative religion is that the difference between Judeo-Christian religion and Asian religious systems, such as Buddhism, resembles the difference between a line and a circle.

In Judaism and Christianity, reality has a beginning and an end. It’s linear. It’s going somewhere. Both beginning and end are mysterious, the former rendered, mythically, in the creation story, the latter represented, at least in Christianity, in the thrilling if baffling formulation that “time shall be no more.” The beginning is believed really to have happened and the end is believed to really be coming.

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