Tag: recipe

Hot Cross Buns (updated with photo)

 

Wildflower Bread hot cross bunsHot cross buns have been associated with the Easter season for centuries. The tradition started in Britain and spread with the empire. That helps explain why the tradition would not be recognized by a desert southwest coffeehouse keeper, as these buns were not part of the old Spanish  culture. As Ree Drummond, the Pioneer Woman, wrote:

English folklore said that Hot Cross Buns baked on Good Friday would never spoil throughout the following year. Some bakers believed that holding on to one Hot Cross Bun and hanging it in the kitchen meant that all yeast products in the coming year would rise successfully. Some sailors took Hot Cross Buns on their voyages to ensure their ships wouldn’t sink. And friends who gift one another with Hot Cross Buns every year are said to remain friends for life.

I noted several years ago that Panera Bread stopped offering hot cross buns, while an Arizona chain, Wildflower Bread, continues to offer holiday orders of hot cross buns. This year, I thought I would try my hand at baking a batch.

If You Can Stand the Heat, Get in the Kitchen: Theory and Practice of Szechuan Cuisine

 

Generally, I only inflict my culinary exploits on the PiT. (Before you start to feel too bad for them, you can rest assured that they are not passive victims in this endeavour). As with so much else in my life, my gastronomic tastes tend to veer a little bit outside of the mainstream, especially for a college student that lives alone. Mostly traditional Chinese, Taiwanese, and Japanese food, as well as some Middle Eastern, and not quite any burgers, spaghetti, and donuts. My parents don’t exactly love it when I come home, and the next day they have a fridge fully stocked with tofu, preserved bamboo shoots, century eggs, kimchi, and the like. (Mom draws the line at congealed blood and chicken feet). With England in lockdown yet again, I’ve had more time than normal to cook for myself, and, like an old and familiar friend, I often gravitate towards Szechuanese and Xi’an food. 

Chinese food encompasses a vast array of regional dishes, ingredients, and methods, but there are, in modern times, the 八大菜系: Eight Great Cuisines of China. Szechuan cuisine is one and is renowned in the country and around the world for its characteristic pungency and spiciness. Commonly available ingredients, like garlic, ginger, sesame paste, and green onion, play a role in this, but so do two ingredients grown almost exclusively in the region. The Szechuan peppercorn, which creates a unique kind of numbing and tongue-tingling spice when consumed, and the heaven facing pepper, oftentimes too hot to be consumed raw but a staple in dried and cooked form. If you’ve ever had Szechuan food, you’ll be familiar with that pepper, and also with the chili oil that is almost ubiquitous in it. 

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I love almost any kind of soup: Thick soup, thin soup, vegetable soup, meat soup, cold soup, hot soup, clear soup, cream soup, soup with “bits” in it, smooth soup. Soup is great. A bowl of steaming chowder on a frosty day, a dish of chilled fruit soup in midsummer. Croutons. Garlic bread. Oyster crackers. […]

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Deep-Dish Gluten-Free Pizza Florentine Alfredo

 

Description

For those who want to live forever and achieve heaven on earth, God created all the ingredients for Pizza Florentine Alfredo. Now, to make your life complete, I shall teach you how to combine them to create a masterpiece you will never forget. As with any pizza, it has a crust, sauce, cheese, and toppings. This particular recipe will provide ingredients and instructions for gluten-free crusts, because the author of the recipe cannot eat any other kind. The primary toppings of this pizza are fresh baby spinach leaves, slivered or sliced almonds, and bacon because that’s what God intended those ingredients for is to be combined on a pizza.

This recipe is made in a 14” non-stick deep-dish pizza pan. If your pan is smaller, you might consider cutting the recipe. If your pan is larger, how do you fit it into your kitchen cabinets?

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We had some tasty Vietnamese noodle soup on this cool evening. I used this paste in two or three quarts of water, added to taste–maybe about a quarter cup. I get it at our town’s local Asian store. Once the water in the stock pot boiled, I took it off the heat and covered it to […]

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It was only after getting roped in on the “How-To” group writing project that I remembered that I really don’t know how to do very much.  The OP suggested recipes, but what do I know about cooking?  I’m a single guy, far more adept at ordering delivery or take-out.  Of course I can cook, meaning […]

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As a practicing Catholic, I take Lent seriously. My family knows that, Sundays and other feast days excepted, there will be no meat and a minimum of fuss on my table. My husband, a Jew comfortable raising his children as Hebrew Catholics, does not dread Lent. He happily married me when I ate no meat […]

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