Tag: Reagan

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Give Him a Horse

 

Okay, I’m pro-Trump. I think any sane conservative must be, given the alternatives. He’s a guy who has been trying to take the country in the direction I want the country to go, rather than into the maelstrom in which the left seems hell-bent on drowning us.

So, yes, I support him, and strongly. But I’m not going to be all hagiographic about it.

Join Jim and Greg for your Friday martinis! After another week of violence in the streets, Democrats are finally starting to pay attention to the issue after failing to mention it at all at their convention. Would stronger statements from Biden be credible and would they get the chaos to stop? They also discuss President Trump’s convention speech and why the length and delivery made it less effective. And while certainly not gamers, they get a kick out of the chance to conduct a clandestine operation on orders from President Reagan – which is part of the latest “Call of Duty.”

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Just a quick observation. If you see kids who are consistently whiny, demanding, rude, and annoying, the problem isn’t the kids. It’s the parents. Kids for the most part grow as their parents shape them. Preview Open

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Politics is not a bad profession. If you succeed there are many rewards, if you disgrace yourself you can always write a book. – Ronald Reagan It seems I am revisiting the theme of politics. The events of the last two weeks makes it relevant. And they demonstrate Ronald Reagan’s wisdom. Preview Open

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This is perhaps the most stirring of President Reagan’s many speeches. I have two versions from youtube, a short one of less than 3 minutes, and a longer one of 13 minutes. (The highlight starts at 2 minutes.) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZgDZdFQY3iM Preview Open

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. 34 Years Ago Today: Politburo Selects Gorbachev as Soviet Leader

 

Thirty-four years ago today, the revolving door that had become the entry point to leadership of the Soviet Union stopped when Mikhail Gorbachev was elected General Secretary of the Communist Party. On that day, he became the fourth Soviet leader in under three years (Brezhnev died in November 1982, Andropov in February of 1984, Chernenko on March 10, 1985). There hadn’t been such drama on the world leadership front since, well, the dramatic and unexpected selection of KarolJózef Wojtyła as Pope in 1978, after the 33-day tenure of Albino Luciani.

A little over six-and-a-half years later, on Christmas Day 1991, and severely compromised as the result of a coup a few months earlier, Gorbachev, the last leader of the USSR, resigned and handed over what was left of his power to new Russian President Boris Yeltsin. On December 26, the Soviet Union was officially dissolved and its Republics were handed their self-governance.

From news reports (one from the BBC, and one from ABC), it appears that, thirty-four years ago today, no-one saw this coming. Well, except, maybe, Maggie (perhaps it was womanly intuition) who said shortly thereafter, “I like Mr. Gorbachev. We can do business together.” By and large, a more perceptive and much more pragmatic observation than that George Bush the younger made years later about his sense of Vladimir Putin’s “soul.”

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. The Long Shadow of Reagan

 
Seen the other night at a clothing store aimed at younger buyers

President Ronald Reagan represents the high-water mark of Republican presidencies within living memory. Eisenhower’s quiet leadership and managerial style are, much like Calvin Coolidge’s, largely forgotten. Nixon’s presidency was marked by an expansion of federal power, followed by a scandal and implosion. Ford is hardly worth mentioning. Bush 41 tried to tack away from Reagan on domestic matters and lasted only a single term. Bush 43 will be long associated with scandals and a collapsed economy, in spite of whatever good he did (and he did do a lot more than we normally acknowledge, but so much was temporary, and the rest is tainted).

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Hear me out – that probably sounds like an odd thing to say. But it’s about symbolism. Young people may not even know about Grenada, but in 1983 President Reagan ordered the U.S. to invade the little Caribbean island, ostensibly to protect American students at a medical school there, after a coup brought a leftist […]

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Henry Olsen joins Brian Anderson to discuss Henry’s new book The Working Class Republican: Ronald Reagan and the Return of Blue-Collar Conservatism.

For nearly 30 years, the Republican Party had defined itself by Ronald Reagan’s legacy: a strong military, free trade, lower taxes, and most important, smaller government. When Donald Trump won the Republican nomination for president in 2016, many observers in the media and professional political circles asked a familiar question: Is the Republican Party still the Party of Reagan?

What does Ronald Reagan’s brand of conservatism mean for the GOP today? In this AEI Events Podcast, Henry Olsen, author of “The Working Class Republican: Ronald Reagan and the Return of Blue-Collar Conservatism,” joins AEI’s Karlyn Bowman and Jonah Goldberg to discuss his understanding of Reagan’s political odyssey.

Henry Olsen’s presentation is followed by two panel discussions, in which experts discuss the “true Reagan” and the future of the Republican Party. The first discussion features Mr. Olsen and Craig Shirley (author of “Regan Rising: The Decisive Years, 1976-1980). The second panel includes Mr. Olsen, Mr. Shirley, Jonah Goldberg (AEI), and Ruy Teixeira (Center for American Progress), and is moderated by William Galston (Brookings Institution).

Presidents are defined by rhetorical moments: Reagan and Kennedy at the Berlin Wall; George W. Bush rallying the nation after the 9/11 attacks. And Donald Trump? So far his presidency hasn’t been one of major addresses. Hoover fellow Peter Robinson, author of Reagan’s famous speech at the Brandenberg Gate, discusses the art of presidential wordsmithery in this age of shock tweets and nonstop news cycles.

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“Which was the greater innovator, which was the more important personage in man’s history – he who first led armies over the Alps, and gained the victories of Cannae and Thrasymene; or the nameless boor who first hammered out for himself an iron spade? When the oak-tree is felled, the whole forest echoes with it; […]

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Presidents are defined by rhetorical moments: Reagan and Kennedy at the Berlin Wall; George W. Bush rallying the nation after the 9/11 attacks. And Donald Trump? So far his presidency hasn’t been one of major addresses. Hoover fellow Peter Robinson, author of Reagan’s famous speech at the Brandenberg Gate, discusses the art of presidential wordsmithery in this age of shock tweets and nonstop news cycles.

Promoted from the Ricochet Member Feed by Editors Created with Sketch. The Question I Would Have Asked

 

Last night I had the good fortune to be invited to an event at the Ronald Reagan Presidential Foundation & Institute in Simi Valley, CA entitled “A Nation Engaged: Power and The Presidency” hosted by NPR News and featuring our beloved patron and founder @peterrobinson and noted Reagan historian Craig Shirley. The discussion that flowed from this pairing of Reagan aficionados was not quite what I expected (although given the participants and the venue not entirely surprising) but, as always with these kinds of things, very enlightening.

The evening began with the audience being lead through the Pledge of Allegiance, and as an immigrant I must say that these small slices of American ritual really do provide a sense of community and shared identity. While my libertarian lizard brain rebels at the idea of pledging allegiance to any government or flag, my sense of American-ness was moved.

Promoted from the Ricochet Member Feed by Editors Created with Sketch. David Keene on the Future of Conservatism

 

We caught up with the remarkable David Keene, founder of the American Conservative Union (which organizes CPAC). Just a few highlights of Mr. Keene’s incredible life: He served as political and/or campaign advisor to Vice President Spiro Agnew, and Presidents Richard Nixon, Ronald Reagan, George H.W. Bush, and as campaign advisor to Bob Dole and Mitt Romney (second run). He also served as President of the National Rifle Association. Currently Mr. Keene is the Opinion Editor at The Washington Times. David shares his wealth of knowledge and wisdom on where conservatism is heading.

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Organizing the White House: Trump Getting it Right

 

In all the stories about Republicans and conservatives lauding President-elect Donald Trump’s cabinet picks – even as Democrats go scalp hunting – one surprising fact has escaped partisan and media attention: This may be the most shrewdly organized entering White House since Ronald Reagan’s. To see why, look at the history of the top inside position, chief of staff.

Starting with Franklin Roosevelt and Dwight Eisenhower, there developed separate Democratic and Republican ways of organizing the White House. Democrats preferred the FDR model in which cabinet members and senior staff enjoyed more or less direct access to the president. Republicans followed Ike’s example and had a strong chief of staff who controlled the all flow of people and information in and out the Oval Office.

As a result, Democratic administrations gained reputations as unruly free-for-alls, Republican ones as disciplined and efficient. But from Eisenhower’s Sherman Adams to George H.W. Bush’s John Sununu and even George W. Bush’s Andrew Card, most GOP chiefs of staff left their posts to one degree or another under a cloud, invited to leave if not publicly forced out.

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We recall Ronald Reagan with great fondness, but why? Was it his tax cuts that spurred the economy and got us out of the stagflation of the late 1970’s? His dedication to conservative principle? How he stared down the Soviet Union to end the Cold War? Preview Open

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Ronald Reagan’s policies of reducing regulations, negotiating a deal with Asian exporters to stop devaluing their currencies, and lowering taxes lead to a robust economy which created twice the number of jobs and twice the Gross Domestic Product seen in our current vaunted ‘recovery’. Economist Peter Morici explains: To listen to President Obama, Americans live in a […]

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Promoted from the Ricochet Member Feed by Editors Created with Sketch. Do You Like Ike?

 

dwight-eisenhowerWith the unexpected direction this election cycle has taken, I’ve found myself repeatedly asking “What kind of president do the American public/Republican primary voters/Tea Partiers/Trump supporters really want?” Whenever we compare contemporary presidential candidates to historical figures, we tend to refer back to a short list of 20th century figures: Wilson, FDR, Nixon, Reagan, Clinton. But one name is conspicuously absent, a name associated with both the period of fastest growth and the most popular presidency of the 20th century: Dwight Eisenhower.

From the perspective of today’s politics, it’s hard to see how someone like Ike could even exist: A fairly non-partisan leader who was genuinely pragmatic; A supporter of the New Deal and public works projects who, nonetheless, didn’t want to cram the government down every throat; A staunch Cold Warrior who still warned against military excesses; And, of course, a man willing to use his executive power to deploy the US military into an matter of social politics. Indeed, the period of his presidency is constantly cited by members of all ideologies as the benchmark of American success and the American Dream. But if Eisenhower was such a success, why do we rarely ever mention him anymore, while we invoke Reagan’s name more frequently than the Lord’s at church?

I think part of the blame falls on Reagan himself. From an intellectual perspective, Reagan aligned himself closely and conspicuously with William F. Buckley and National Review, which — I have been told — was created during the 1950s partly as a counter-reaction to Ike’s affinity for big government. But here’s the essay question: Was Reagan more like Goldwater or more like Eisenhower?