Tag: Rain

Desert Rains

 

DesertRainThis evening, God picked up the blue bowl of the desert sky and gently set it upside down, the pale orange inside glowing faintly overhead. Rain drizzled gently, steadily from the pale orange bowl high overhead.

The rain moved quietly across the desert valley floor. No great gusts of wind, bright flashes of lightening, or cracks of thunder heralded the soft rain, that gently settled the dust and soaked slowly into the hard-packed desert floor, gradually forming puddles just deep enough to dampen a walker’s sneaker-clad feet. Mind you, the wise desert dwellers deployed a compact umbrella or donned a rain-resistant poncho, and kept a weather eye out for drivers peering through windshields poorly cleared by seldom used wipers in poor repair. What a perfect evening for soaking in the scent and sound of gentle desert rains.

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The summer monsoon rains finally broke through the heat shield in the Valley of the Sun Thursday evening, July 22. Until now we had rain on the hilltops, rain on the trees, but not on the valley. The monsoon rains bring with them the usual warnings about flash flooding and the stupid motorist law. When […]

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We are enjoying a few days of cooler weather, with grey skies occasionally lowering to gently rain on the desert floor. In the high country, north and south of the Valley of the Sun, the mountains have a fresh coat of snow. All of this is carried to us on the desert winds.  Arizona is […]

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In the past day, we have had pouring rain, high winds, flooding, and last night, snow.  The back yard was covered in snow late last night, but it had mostly melted by midnight.  This is our front yard, and the neighbor across the street this morning.  Our area is known for its many microclimates. Preview […]

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Quote of the Day: Rainy Day Memory

 

“There are many things I do for amusement, but for happiness I like to gather up my memories and go for a walk in the rain.” – Robert Brault

I have four older sisters. One summer in the mid-’80s, they were working for The Daily Herald, Utah County’s newspaper. They had to deliver the paper to people who hadn’t received theirs. One day, they decided to take me with them. We were riding in a Volkswagen Rabbit, I believe.

We had just begun when the rain started coming down heavily. We were just about to descend on a hill when we saw a large puddle spreading through the intersection. It was a one way stop and no one was there. All of us stripped off our shoes and socks and played in the rain. We were drenched!

Giving thanks for rain in the desert

 

DesertRainSortly before dawn, a steady sound almost like a small engine, came through the screen windows. It was a very steady rain, as the sounds of water gushing out of drain pipes soon confirmed. A quick check of the forecast confirmed that Central Arizona is in for a work week of rain, for which I give thanks. It might even be raining cats and dogs later in the day!

Yes, the rainfall arrived with the first day of Fall, the autumnal equinox. The extended forecast shows we are done with triple digit days, presumably until late next Spring. I note, merely for the record, that today’s forecast is for a high 10 degrees below “normal.” Since we’ve been bouncing around, high and low, for the past month, and look to do so going forward, I conclude nothing, except that “normal” is a mere median or mean measure of some local recorded historical data.

Enjoy the weather. If you are local, stay out of washes and flooded roads, especially underpasses! Consider that you like acknowledgement for your good work, so the Creator might also appreciate a few words of thanksgiving for the pleasure and benefit to the land of a good soaking rain.

Cloudburst — only a paper cloud?

 

“Tell me, burnt earth: Is there no water? Is there only dust? Is there only the blood of bare-footed footsteps on the thorns?” “The wilderness and the wasteland shall be glad for them, And the desert shall rejoice and blossom as the rose.”

Eric Whitacre is a conductor and composer with matinee-idol good looks, personal magnetism, a slick marketing strategy, and arguably common sense, too: he recommends young composers not waste time acquiring training in academic theory beyond what they need to write music that sounds good. Whitacre is beloved in the choral world, but also, sometimes, disdained — for being overrated (he is, although overrated can still be good), for being gimmicky (also true, though his gimmicks often land), and for writing music “suffused with a sense of easy spiritual uplift… Everything [is] maximally radiant and beautiful, and beautifully sung. And that [is] the problem.”

If that’s the problem, it’s a problem many composers would like to have. Or at least it’s a problem many performing musicians wish the composers whose music they have to perform had. Our disdainer continues, “Whitacre is so sincere I suspect he would glow in the dark.”

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It is a lovely, cool, rainy day in the Valley of the Sun. We very much need the rains, and a snow pack on the mountains to the north, to replenish the reservoirs from the dry decade in the drought cycle. Arizona has been in drought since August 2009. The more water falls in Arizona, […]

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Report from a Harvey House

 

If you look at Kelley’s Restaurant (appears at about 0:45 seconds, long building with the black roof), the street where I live is opposite the Kelley’s. I live about half a mile from FM-518 up that road.

It’s the Harvard Lunch Club Podcast for September 6, 2016 – the Hillary’s Immigration Wall edition. We are nanophysicist Mike Stopa and radio talk host Todd Feinburg and this week we are discussing:

Note: Rent-seeking is an economics term that means rigging things so that you get benefits from the economy without contributing productivity to the economy.