Tag: radio

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Arahant Begins: A Ricochet Silent Radio Origin Story

 

I had a most unusual wartime career. I’m from Illinois but my great-grandfathers fought for the Confederacy. A touch of rebellion and a streak of belligerence runs in the family. The Depression hit us hard. Before Pearl Harbor, I was living in a tiny, fifth-floor, walk-up apartment on the lower east side of Manhattan, taking night courses in business administration at City College. I wrote stories in my spare time and worked for a midtown publisher, Street and Smith. On December 12, the morning after Hitler declared war on the USA, a friend and co-worker of mine joined the mobs at the recruiting station near the office. Bob and I both went Navy. That was the last I saw of him for a couple of years, and they were busy years. I was a radio operator on a sub tender in the south Atlantic. The Navy trained me well. I thought I had no natural aptitude for technology. It seems ironic given how things turned out.

In September 1943, mid-winter south of the Equator, I was suddenly shipped Stateside. No explanation. Two weeks later, I reported to the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard and was ordered to report for tests at the Naval Research Laboratory. They had some kind of psychological screening program. I was sent to a crowded waiting room at the base hospital. The air was blue with cigarette smoke, cursing, and boredom. Waiting, waiting, waiting. To my surprise, my old New York pal Bob walked in, but that moment, before we even had a chance to say hello, a duty officer appeared with a clipboard. When it’s alphabetical, I usually go first, like I did here. He barked out, “Arahant! Asimov! Heinlein! Hubbard! Get in here, on the double!”

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Glenn Beck is a conservative political commentator, radio host and television producer. He and Bridget discuss the early evolution of his career, his love affair with radio, the transition from CNN to Fox News, attending Yale at age 30, and mistakes he’s made along the way. They delve into the value of struggle and overcoming […]

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Almost This Day in History: Powel Crosley Said Let There Be Light – May 24, 1935

 
Crosley Field May 24, 1935 First major league night game

On May 24, 1935, almost 84 years ago, the first major league baseball game was played at night under the lights at Crosley Field in Cincinnati, Ohio. It was a big enough deal that President Roosevelt got involved in the event pressing a gold telegraph key in the White House which switched on a signal lamp 500 miles away at Crosley Field thus notifying Reds general manager Larry MacPhail to flip a switch to illuminate the playing field with 632 recently installed floodlights. The first night game was on.

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. The Winds of War: Herman Wouk Dead at 103

 

He was many things. A gag writer, a sailor at war, a novelist, the grandson of a rabbi. But above everything else, he was a storyteller. Herman Wouk has died at age 103.

He is best remembered for his breakthrough novel, The Caine Mutiny, and an epic pair of television mini-series The Winds of War and War and Remembrance. Caine won the 1951 Pulitzer and was made into a classic film starring Humphrey Bogart as the mentally unstable Captain Queeg.

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Sentimental Journey: Doris Day Passes at 97

 

Les Brown and Doris Day (C. 1945)
The most tempting cliche in noting the passing of a celebrity is that a death marks “an end of an era.” Doris Day’s era ended much sooner than she did, but she truly was the last of her kind. She was the last of the great “girl singers” of the Big Band Era, the last of the great musical stars of the Hollywood studio system and the last performer to have headlined a weekly half-hour network radio show.

Rechristened Doris Day because Doris von Kappelhoff was a mouthful and a bit of a stretch for a marquee, she began her career singing on WLW (The Nation’s Station) in her hometown of Cincinnati, Ohio. At that time, WLW had a habit of taking local acts and turning them into national sensations. Besides Day, WLW launched the careers of Rosemary Clooney, Andy Williams, and the Mills Brothers. It was in Cincinnati that she hooked up with Les Brown and his Band of Renown. Their partnership resulted in her first number one hit, Sentimental Journey. 

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. ‘Twas the Night Before Christmas 1947

 

Down on the corner of Antoinette and Peter Streets in Peoria, Illinois, a young man named Jim Jordan was singing in the choir at St. John’s Catholic Church. He had his eye on a Irish lass by the name of Marian Driscoll, the twelfth of thirteen children of coal miner Daniel and his wife Anna. Her parents weren’t keen on him because he seemed to have ambitions for show business. Still, they fell in love and in August of 1918 they were married.

After a stint in the Army and a battle with flu during the great pandemic, Jim gave up his dreams and became a mailman while Marian taught voice and piano. Children quickly followed. But Jim remained restless. They tried their hand at vaudeville and failed miserably. Then, one day while visiting his brother in Chicago, Jim heard a radio show he thought was awful and believed he and Marian could do better. After an audition they were signed for a weekly show.

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John Hinderaker, known to Ricochetti at least by the Power Line podcasts, is guest hosting the Laura Ingraham radio show this Thursday, Friday, and next Tuesday through Thursday. He invited Power Line readers to call. Perhaps some Ricochet members might call, spreading the R> brand by brilliant question or comment! More

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Hawai’i Civil Defense Issued False Missile Warning

 

With North Korea’s nuclear capabilities growing and their leader boasting that he can hit any city in the United States, the State of Hawai’i was conducting a drill of their civil defense alert system and accidentally sent out a state-wide warning of an incoming ICBM.

Sirens wailed and it took 38 minutes for them to send out a message canceling the original message. Rep. Tulsi Gabbard confirmed it was a false alarm and sent out a Tweet but who’s watching Twitter when you think the world is about to end in nuclear war?

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Promoted from the Ricochet Member Feed by Editors Created with Sketch. Milt Rosenberg, RIP

 

Media blogger Robert Feder brings the sad news that Milt Rosenberg died Tuesday, and gives the legendary interviewer his due.

“He was a polymath, a perceptive analyst, and a keen questioner,” Morris told friends in an email Wednesday. “These traits, combined with a prodigious memory born of wide reading and experience, made him an outstanding interlocutor of political leaders, business executives, academics, journalists, artists, and others in the long parade of guests whom he welcomed to his studios and to the extraordinary conversations that he then held for the benefit of millions of Americans listening to his program each night in their homes and cars across the nation as streamed by clear-channel radio at 50,000 watts. For four decades his show was the mandatory first stop on the book tour of every author of a serious work of fiction or non-fiction.

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As an engineer with 10 patents, I understand the old saw that “Patents are the world’s most expensive vanity press.” So no matter how unique or important the invention, one must consider the costs of obtaining and defending a patent in court. Many times patents are generated by big companies to avoid litigation.* For smaller […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Hokey Smoke! June Foray Dead at 99

 
June Foray’ at the Happy Feet Two’ film premiere, Los Angeles 13 Nov 2011 Photo by Jim Smeal/BEI/Shutterstock

Another piece of your childhood is gone. Voice actress June Foray has passed away at age 99.

Unlike her male counterpart, Mel Blanc, Foray was non-exclusive to any one studio. She did voices for Disney, Warner Brothers and Jay Ward. It was the latter where she became somewhat of a cult figure as the voice of both Rocky the Flying Squirrel and Natasha Fatale, female companion of diminutive spy Boris Badenov.

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. One Man’s Impact

 

On December 19, radio host Charlie Sykes completed his last broadcast for WTMJ in Milwaukee, WI. His last hours on the air were adorned with encomia from some of the leading figures his show had helped to incubate: Reince Preibus, Scott Walker, Ron Johnson, and Paul Ryan, among many others. For three and a half hours every day for 23 years, Wisconsinites got the Charlie Sykes catechism: free markets, rule of law, school reform, free speech (and anti-PC), and strong families. The policy meal was substantial and nourishing, but that didn’t mean the taste was bland. Sykes delivered information with just the right soupçon of humor and entertainment, and, of course, a hearty serving of Green Bay Packers hits.

Along with five other conservative talk radio hosts, and with the help of the Bradley Foundation (whose headquarters are in Milwaukee), Sykes helped to create a climate of opinion in Wisconsin that led to actual policy results. With the steady, smart, daily spadework of persuasion, Sykes opened his microphones to conservative reformers in politics, education, and the courts. Long before the “blue wall” crumbled in the 2016 electoral map, Charlie Sykes had been scaling the ramparts of Wisconsin’s entrenched liberal fortresses.

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Member Post

 

We start with a confession: I am not that witty. Maybe mildly humorous on a good day. But I have good writers. When I was a teenager I fell in love with network radio from the so-called “Golden Age.” I was most certainly the only one in my high school that did. Back then you […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Building a High Rise on the Foundation of a Colonial Home

 

Television. When you’re building something from the ground up, it needs a good foundation. The Empire State building, for example, rests on a foundation that is 55 feet below the surface of the earth. The same applies to business, not just monetarily, but in the way ideas are executed. Rob Long wrote about Netflix’s disruptive influence on television. The question then follows: Is Netflix built on a solid foundation, or will it crumble under its own weight?

Entertainment media in The United States lays on a foundation dug and set between 1926 and 1927 by two men, David Sarnoff of the Radio Corporation of America and William S. Paley. When those two men established their radio networks — NBC and CBS, respectively — they decided that audiences would receive their product for free and that programming would be paid for by advertisers. The audience, of course, had to purchase their radio sets (a bonus for Sarnoff if you bought an RCA model), but that was it.

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Promoted from the Ricochet Member Feed by Editors Created with Sketch. David Bowie, RIP

 

1974-dodge-dart-sport-interiorDavid Bowie died tonight. He was 69. His birthday was January 8.

I was never much of a fan, but Bowie, like many rockers of the early ’70s, had an impact on me that I’m only beginning to understand now, after all these years. In 1974, when I was a wee lad of seventeen, I landed a job as a disc jockey at the local Top 40 station. My head started swelling that first night — the graveyard shift — because I saw myself as a bit of a star, although I was just wise enough to know that I was living vicariously through men and women who had real talent (or in some cases, what passed for talent). But it was a helluva ride. I figured the chicks would dig it. Of course I was wrong, but self-deception at that age is a necessary stimulant, and at least I was miles ahead of my burger-slinging buddies: I’d done my stint at the Golden Arches Banquet Hall at age 16.

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I listen to Rush Limbaugh on the local AM station, and I’m usually tuned in to Sirius/XM Satellite Radio when I’m in the car, and I’ve long noticed how different their ads are from the FM music stations. The AM and satellite ads are often so awful that I have to turn the radio off […]

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Milt is now back on terrestrial radio, every weekday from Noon until 2pm Central on 1590 WCGO in Chicago. Find him online at http://www.1590wcgo.com/ More

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Sidebars of History: Radio, War and a Man of God

 

Modern communication covers the globe so thoroughly these days that Tinder even works in the vast wastland of Antarctica and with the proper amount of internet bandwidth it’s possible for just about anyone to produce a broadcast-acceptable audio feed from just about any place in the world.

Of course that wasn’t always the case. Just 34 years ago when ABC’s Sam Donaldson broke the news of John Hinckley Jr’s attempt on the life of President Reagan, he did it by yanking someone off their call at a phone booth across the street from the Washington Hilton.

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Those of us who love Milt Rosenberg’s program did not have to suffer complete withdrawal pangs, thanks to his website and Ricochet. Still, the thought of Professor Rosenberg returning to a live show for two hours each weekday gladdens the heart. Robert Feder has the details on his Chicago Tribune media blog: More

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