Tag: Race

Atlas Shrugs, Pours Another Brew, and Belches Loudly

 

Ayn Rand, for all the often justified criticism she and her Objectivist philosophy receive, deserves credit for her prescient portrayals of the modern institutional and intellectual challenges to western civilization. Her two major works, Atlas Shrugged and The Fountainhead, are, in my opinion, required reading for any culturally literate critic of today’s progressive left.

In particular, Rand highlighted the collapse of meritocracy. In Atlas Shrugged, anti-competitive legislation (e.g., the “Anti-dog-eat-dog” bill) captured in caricature the rent-seeking behavior of today’s large and entrenched corporations, as they seek to stymie entry into the sectors they dominate by less well-connected upstarts. This is an expression of simple greed, on both the corporate and political sides.

Join Jim and Greg as they dissect President Biden’s attempt to put a fresh coat of paint on the same old agenda Democrats have been pushing for decades, including his push for massive tax hikes and insistence that his gun control agenda is compliant with the second amendment. They also cheer Tim Scott for a terrific GOP response, in which he blew up several false narratives from Democrats and pushed for critical items like school choice. And they hammer media outlets of both political persuasions for publishing stories that didn’t have all the facts right and for catering to favored politicians.

Stupid Thoughts on the Passing Scene – and a Poll

 

Current administration got you down? Cheer up. Kamala Harris is Vice President.

On January 19, 1989, his last full day in office, President Reagan warned the nation: “Freedom is never more than one generation away from extinction.” Nine months later, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez was born.

California has frequent wildfires due to bad forest management. Then you have the looting and burning in Democrat cities. Why do things managed by Democrats frequently catch on fire? Why aren’t they embarrassed by that?

Angel Eduardo is a writer, musician, photographer and artist. He and Bridget discuss the discipline of being a professional artist, the moral panic around art these days, self-censorship and the fear of being cancelled, victimhood culture, exercise & discipline, Bridget’s ideal super power, why mistakes are like wrapping paper, what to do when you’re lost, and the ground we’re losing in the equality movement. Angel explains his concept of “star-manning,” a way of engaging in discourse with each other that acknowledges a person’s point of view and their intentions in a conversation as a means of finding common ground, making them feel heard, and making them more likely to listen to you in return. He believes that most people mean well, and we often lose sight of that fact and depersonalize them in a disagreement, particularly over social media. Learn more about Angel on his website, angeleduardo.com.

If You Were Trying to Start a Race War…..

 

…. would you change a single thing from what the far-left of America is doing now?

I know the title may seem provocative to some as this idea is but a subset of a universe of things we proles are not supposed to even think about, much less say out loud. If it seems provocative, good, because it seems to me to be high time more people started talking openly about what is happening all around us every day.

Britain Leads on “Race” with a Remarkable Report

 

Dr Sewell PM Boris JohnsonBoris Johnson’s government has done something important for a world that would regain or retain freedom from the serfdom of the socialist left. When challenged with Black Lives Matter and other Marxist front groups posing as social justice warriors, PM Johnson had a serious commission, comprised almost entirely of ethnic/racial minority members, dig into the real facts, conducting a deep dive into extensive data. The Commission on Race and Ethnic Disparities, issued its report on March 31, 2021.* This report, at 258 pages, is written in clear English, not leftist academic jargon. You must read at least the foreword, introduction and recommendations, as they speak just as clearly to contemporary America as to the United Kingdom.

In response to the massive leftist street violence and claims of systemic white racism, the Johnson government announced the membership of a Commission on Race and Ethnic Disparities on 16 July 2020.** It is a credit to Boris Johnson, and the politically and culturally brave members of the commission, that this report has been put before the British public and the world after only 9 months. No American panel or commission could do as well in twice the time, based on our history of blue-ribbon committees, commissions, and panels. You may be sure that the U.S. Department of Defense reports from the supposed studies launched in June 2020 will be embarrassing pseudo-research by comparison.

Written in the first person, in the voice of the Commission chair, Dr. Tony Sewell, the Forward, introduction, and full recommendations are compelling. What follows is an extensive excerpt, with emphasis added [and a few parenthetical comments by me]. Note the absence of poisonous race-baiting and white-shaming. Note how Dr. Sewell and the commission speak the hard truth about poor whites, especially poor white boys, being in some of the very worst, least “privileged” or powerful positions in Britain. This is likely also true here in the United States.

Rob Long is on for Jim again today. Join Rob and Greg as they cheer states expanding their school choice programs as unions continue to keep public schools closed. They also discuss New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo ordering faster, preferential COVID tests for family and friends while the rest of New York waited much longer for results. They also shake their heads as San Francisco lefties state that whites and men will not be receiving welfare benefits. And they wrap up with their memories of the assassination attempt again President Reagan 40 years ago today.

Black Lives Matter

 

It is true that young black men are being killed disproportionately — killed brutally, ruthlessly, and unjustly. And we need to talk about it if we hope to put an end to it.

We have data, and that data has been studied carefully. We know, based on that, that police are not the ones doing the killing. We know, based on that data, that police do not disproportionately kill young black men.

Critical Corrosion of American Military, Pt. 1

 

We are hollowing out our military again, placing Americans in danger, both those in uniform and the civilian population. In the 1970s, the military was wracked by equipment, training, and personnel problems. After two decades of not-so-small wars, the American military again faces equipment, training and personnel problems, with a new twist. The latest United States Service Academy (West Point) cheating scandal is one manifestation of a 21st Century personnel problem, created by senior leaders embracing critical race theory, a leftist assault on our Constitution and institutions. This leftist assault, embraced by elites, civilian and military, weakens the foundations of integrity and trust in our military at every level.

From January 2021 onward, the American military has shown very troubling signs of accelerated politicization, with attendant concerns about weakness in the face of a resurgent threat environment. This is more than a single post, so I will start with the “so what,” with why it really matters if our military becomes like a socialist military, with political commissars enforcing party doctrine as national interest. I will then briefly outline how training and practice of the military-styled “Equal Opportunity” changed over the decades. Finally, we will take a look at the case of critical corrosion at West Point, the United States Military Academy.

POLITICAL MILITARIES UNDERPERFORM

A Letter to My Woke Friends

 

I don’t buy your narrative that America is a racist country. I think you are ignorant: you have a cramped and impoverished understanding of history, and no sense of proportion. I reject your “white privilege” palaver. I don’t slice and dice my fellow man into little groups based on superficial characteristics, and I won’t claim to know any more about a man based on his skin color than you know about me based on mine.

Diversity and inclusion? You can keep it. Diversity of views is lovely. Diversity of race, sexual orientation, color, and other trivial details of anatomy and preference is a crock. Every man is an identity group of one, so keep your woke bigotry. You obsess about it all you like, but I’m not interested.

‘Systemic Racism’ a Red Herring in Evictions

 

Last month, I testified before the New York State Advisory Committee to the United States Commission on Civil Rights on the vexed question of “Discrimination in Eviction Policies and Enforcement.” Several months before my testimony, the commission issued a report concluding that the United States “is in the middle of an eviction crisis, one in which persons of color are disproportionately impacted and suffer unequal treatment.” The study further held that the racial disparities in eviction that existed pre-COVID have been magnified since the pandemic struck—such that the eviction crisis has an important civil rights dimension.

The economic impact of the pandemic has been exceptionally devastating in New York, in part because of the severe limitations that Governor Andrew Cuomo placed on economic activities under his broad emergency powers. These restrictions directly hamper the ability of tenants to earn money and pay rent, thereby affecting the earnings of landlords, many of whom are part-time. The question then arises as to what kinds of remedial activities should be taken in both the short and long term.

To the New York State Advisory Committee, as well as many other commentators, the solution is a moratorium on tenant evictions. The committee believes the current moratorium should be kept in place, perhaps for as long as it takes for the economy to return to normal. This assessment is supported by the common assertion that the disparate impact of evictions on black and other minority populations is evidence of an entrenched form of “structural racism” that requires corrective measures. The disparate impact of the pandemic cannot be denied. But in my view, any claim of structural racism (or worse) cannot be sustained.

Join Jim and Greg as they chronicle the second accusation of sexual harassment against New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo and his ever-changing response to it. They also get a kick out of the possibility that Florida Democrats might dust off Charlie Crist to challenge Gov. Ron DeSantis in 2022. And they fire back at an NBC “explainer” on hate crimes, which suggests reporters need to be very careful about labeling something a hate crime if the offender is not white.

Chad Benson is in for Jim today. Chad and Greg examine new research from the Federal Reserve showing the Biden racial equity agenda would actually make the wealth divide much greater. They also react to a pair of House Dems trying to get cable TV providers to cut ties with Fox News, OANN, and Newsmax. And they shake their heads as Merrick Garland draws a peculiar line between what is domestic terrorism and what is not.

Coca-Cola’s Diversity Diktat Falls Flat

 

It is a commonplace of modern rhetoric to exalt diversity and inclusion as a first step toward racial justice. The standard account, widely accepted in political and business circles, insists their combined benefits are unambiguous: a firm’s performance will improve if its employees, suppliers, and customers are composed of individuals from all races, genders, sexual orientations, and general points of view. These diverse persons are not intended as mere tokens but are respected for offering their distinct and valuable perspectives on vital matters critical to corporate and national welfare.

As an abstract matter, it is hard to oppose an employment strategy that generates higher revenues and superior innovation. But once we get down to brass tacks, the overall picture is far more complex. The massive coercion involved in implementing diversity norms was recently revealed by Coca-Cola, which has gone all-in on diversity and inclusion for its more than 700,000 employees: “We champion diversity by building a workforce as diverse as the consumers we serve. Because the more perspectives we have, the better decisions we make.”

It would, however, be a mistake to assume that Coke thinks that it has made good on its key promise. In January, Coke’s new African-American general counsel, Bradley Gayton, laid down this broadside, “Commitment to Diversity, Belonging, and Outside Counsel Diversity,” in which he describes what he perceives to be the abject failure of prior efforts to reach requisite levels of diversity and inclusion at Coke and in the legal profession more broadly. Without a link to a source or statistic, Gayton lashes into the legal profession for being “too quick to celebrate stagnant progress and reward intentions.” Gayton demands specific actions to meet the “crisis on our hands” engendered by a lack of diversity.

This Sounds Like Truth

 

I saw this link on Rush’s website, from yesterday’s show. Sometimes you read something and say, “Why didn’t I think of that?” This is one of those pieces that smacks you between the eyes. One quote I especially like from the article:

White liberals have convinced black people to take God out of the equation and replace Him with Barack Obama, LeBron James, Dr. Harry Edwards, Colin Kaepernick, Black Lives Matter and all the other approved symbols of unapologetic blackness.

Cydnee Black uploaded her first makeup tutorial to YouTube in 2013, at that time, she was one of the few African Americans doing makeup tutorials. She now has over 1 million subscribers and is considered an “influencer” even though she despises that term. She has since transitioned into researching moments in history that interest her and creating informational videos about topics such as the Clarence Thomas/Anita Hill hearings, JFK’s affairs, and the life of Coco Chanel, while still doing makeup applications. She talks to Bridget being a black girl with blue eyes, how she was bullied for “speaking white,” and how she and her sister were the only black kids at their school. They cover why you should never idolize anyone on the internet, why women hate their bodies so much, keeping themselves small to make others feel more comfortable, BLM, cancel culture, psychics, colorism, and being your own brand.

Trump’s Real Record on Race

 

As president, Trump pardoned Alice Williams, an African-American grandmother and first-time offender convicted on a nonviolent drug offense. Ms. Williams had received life in prison, under Biden’s 1994 crime bill, which disproportionately imprisoned black Americans for nonviolent offenses.

Even Democrat Van Jones, the leftist, African-American CNN pundit and prison-reform advocate, effusively praised Trump, calling the First Step Act a “Christmas miracle.”

Critical Race Theory and Its Discontents

 

Most Americans were not aware when a toxic theory of race relations deeply embedded itself into our culture, especially our schools.

Critical race theory (CRT) sounds like sophisticated academic reasoning, but it is not rooted in any science nor subjected to disciplined analysis. It is based on the assumption that white people are born with a belief in their own superiority and with prejudice against other races that, because it is inborn, can never be eliminated.

Racism is defined as the mindset of judging people on the basis of their race.  It is profoundly racist to believe that any person’s beliefs can be reliably determined based only on their skin color.

How Affirmative Action Falls Short

 

It has been fifty-six years since the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, legislation that took aim at the systematic forms of legal segregation that had long dominated large segments of American life. It did not take an expert in implicit biases to see the corrupting influence that officially sanctioned racial segregation had on public life, nor did it take a subtle analysis to understand the importance of the Voting Rights Act of 1965 in undoing the exclusion of African-American citizens from their lawful place in society. The effects of these statutory reforms were lasting and profound.

The passage of these landmark statutes did not put an end to racial conflict simply because they ended explicit forms of discrimination. Indeed, one of the toughest issues to resolve was the proper regime for dealing with labor markets. The great mistake of the 1964 Civil Rights Act was to adopt an explicit colorblind standard for employment under Title VII, which had the effect of slowing down the introduction of affirmative action programs that might have led to more African-American employees in the workplace, especially in unionized firms.

Those affirmative action programs received belated judicial approval in United Steelworkers v. Weber (1979), in which Justice William Brennan held that Title VII “does not prohibit such race-conscious affirmative action plans.” In Weber, Justice Brennan upheld a program that set aside 50 percent of the in-plant craft-training places for black workers until they achieved parity to the percentage of black workers in the overall labor force within that community. That decision was the second major piece of Title VII’s employment law regime, following the 1971 decision in Griggs v. Duke Power, which had previously adopted a strict “business necessity” test to justify a disparate impact that any facially neutral test or business practice had on racial minorities. Weber enabled affirmative action programs, while Griggs blocked discrimination against protected minority groups.

Join Jim and Greg as they chronicle the media meltdown over President Trump’s return to the White House and the genuinely concerning commentary from Washington Post columnist Jennifer Rubin. They also discuss the revelations of another extramarital scandal involving Cal Cunningham, the Democrat running for U.S. Senate in North Carolina. And they dissect Joe Biden’s latest cringe-inducing racial statement and explain how it’s not really a gaffe as much as it is a window into the very different ways Democrats and Republicans look at minorities and the poor.