Tag: Race

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. This Sounds Like Truth

 

I saw this link on Rush’s website, from yesterday’s show. Sometimes you read something and say, “Why didn’t I think of that?” This is one of those pieces that smacks you between the eyes. One quote I especially like from the article:

White liberals have convinced black people to take God out of the equation and replace Him with Barack Obama, LeBron James, Dr. Harry Edwards, Colin Kaepernick, Black Lives Matter and all the other approved symbols of unapologetic blackness.

Cydnee Black uploaded her first makeup tutorial to YouTube in 2013, at that time, she was one of the few African Americans doing makeup tutorials. She now has over 1 million subscribers and is considered an “influencer” even though she despises that term. She has since transitioned into researching moments in history that interest her and creating informational videos about topics such as the Clarence Thomas/Anita Hill hearings, JFK’s affairs, and the life of Coco Chanel, while still doing makeup applications. She talks to Bridget being a black girl with blue eyes, how she was bullied for “speaking white,” and how she and her sister were the only black kids at their school. They cover why you should never idolize anyone on the internet, why women hate their bodies so much, keeping themselves small to make others feel more comfortable, BLM, cancel culture, psychics, colorism, and being your own brand.

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Trump’s Real Record on Race

 

As president, Trump pardoned Alice Williams, an African-American grandmother and first-time offender convicted on a nonviolent drug offense. Ms. Williams had received life in prison, under Biden’s 1994 crime bill, which disproportionately imprisoned black Americans for nonviolent offenses.

Even Democrat Van Jones, the leftist, African-American CNN pundit and prison-reform advocate, effusively praised Trump, calling the First Step Act a “Christmas miracle.”

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Critical Race Theory and Its Discontents

 

Most Americans were not aware when a toxic theory of race relations deeply embedded itself into our culture, especially our schools.

Critical race theory (CRT) sounds like sophisticated academic reasoning, but it is not rooted in any science nor subjected to disciplined analysis. It is based on the assumption that white people are born with a belief in their own superiority and with prejudice against other races that, because it is inborn, can never be eliminated.

Racism is defined as the mindset of judging people on the basis of their race. It is profoundly racist to believe that any person’s beliefs can be reliably determined based only on their skin color.

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. How Affirmative Action Falls Short

 

It has been fifty-six years since the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, legislation that took aim at the systematic forms of legal segregation that had long dominated large segments of American life. It did not take an expert in implicit biases to see the corrupting influence that officially sanctioned racial segregation had on public life, nor did it take a subtle analysis to understand the importance of the Voting Rights Act of 1965 in undoing the exclusion of African-American citizens from their lawful place in society. The effects of these statutory reforms were lasting and profound.

The passage of these landmark statutes did not put an end to racial conflict simply because they ended explicit forms of discrimination. Indeed, one of the toughest issues to resolve was the proper regime for dealing with labor markets. The great mistake of the 1964 Civil Rights Act was to adopt an explicit colorblind standard for employment under Title VII, which had the effect of slowing down the introduction of affirmative action programs that might have led to more African-American employees in the workplace, especially in unionized firms.

Those affirmative action programs received belated judicial approval in United Steelworkers v. Weber (1979), in which Justice William Brennan held that Title VII “does not prohibit such race-conscious affirmative action plans.” In Weber, Justice Brennan upheld a program that set aside 50 percent of the in-plant craft-training places for black workers until they achieved parity to the percentage of black workers in the overall labor force within that community. That decision was the second major piece of Title VII’s employment law regime, following the 1971 decision in Griggs v. Duke Power, which had previously adopted a strict “business necessity” test to justify a disparate impact that any facially neutral test or business practice had on racial minorities. Weber enabled affirmative action programs, while Griggs blocked discrimination against protected minority groups.

Join Jim and Greg as they chronicle the media meltdown over President Trump’s return to the White House and the genuinely concerning commentary from Washington Post columnist Jennifer Rubin. They also discuss the revelations of another extramarital scandal involving Cal Cunningham, the Democrat running for U.S. Senate in North Carolina. And they dissect Joe Biden’s latest cringe-inducing racial statement and explain how it’s not really a gaffe as much as it is a window into the very different ways Democrats and Republicans look at minorities and the poor.

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When you consider the extraordinary and disturbing events of the last several months (lockdowns, riots, etc.), it is not inappropriate to ask if there is any sanity left in this country. One thing’s for sure. If the answer is no, then the last people you should want to consult about it are so-called professionals in […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. The American Meltdown

 

Police confront rioters, South Portland, OR, Aug. 20.
It’s now a common trope to claim that the United States is so deeply racist that massive structural changes are needed in how government and private institutions operate. That dangerous claim has gained exceptional influence at all levels of education—from elementary school to graduate-level programs. But this idea rests on a wholly misguided understanding of the facts on the ground.

It is surely correct to mourn the death of any individual, regardless of cause. But it is also imperative not to make false causal accusations, as protesters have done, by attributing the deaths of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, and other African Americans to entrenched police brutality and institutional racism. It is not just activists who make this claim. It also our governing organizations. The New Jersey Educational Association uses the Black Lives Matter banner to advocate a major reformation of the education system: “It is impossible to see the video of [Floyd] being strangled under the knee of a police officer in broad daylight on a public street and not be disgusted, horrified, angry, [and] sad.”

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. The Oprah Conversation: “Racist!”

 

Let’s have a conversation about race, shall we? Because Oprah wants us to. Like on her new Apple TV show, “The Oprah Conversation,” the first episode of which was entitled “How To Be Anti-Racist” (because simply not being racist isn’t good enough). But be forewarned, white people. It is necessarily going to be a tad one-sided. That’s because the fundamental premise of any conversation with you about race is going to be that, well, you are just . . . no . . . damn . . . good. Alrighty? Let’s do it then.

Let’s talk about white racism, “white privilege,” “white advantage,” the “white power structure,” “whiteness,” and “white” this and “white” that and nothing but white, white, white, until if you hear the word “white” used in a derogatory way one more time, you’re just going to . . .

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https://pjmedia.com/columns/megan-fox/2020/08/13/media-silent-after-white-5-year-old-shot-dead-in-front-of-family-by-black-neighbor-n787345 Are the “main” press outlets just trying to keep this quiet so they don’t start stomping some downtown, or camping in some park, or painting the streets? Preview Open

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. BLM Is a Marxist, Racist Fraud

 

They claim to be fighting for “social justice,” “black liberation,” and “black sovereignty.” Although it’s unclear how we would know when those goals are met, they promise to “burn down the system” if they don’t achieve success. But black Americans already enjoy full legal equality and civil rights protected by law. Polls reveal that police are well regarded by 70 percent of minority community members. Charges of excessive black deaths at the hands of police have been statistically debunked many times.

So what’s really going on here? BLM was founded by proud Marxists with the avowed intent of spreading Marxist ideology. In a 2015 interview, co-founder Patrice Cullors broke the code, stating “myself and Alicia [Garza] in particular are trained organizers. We are trained Marxists.” Nothing said or done since would provide cause for doubt.

Many well-intentioned Americans buy the notion that BLM is a populist movement dedicated to combatting police brutality against blacks and promoting the welfare of the black underclass. But Marxism is an ideology devoted to the destruction of democratic capitalism and the eventual triumph of the proletariat.

John Wood Jr. comes by to talk about Braver Angels, the largest grassroots bipartisan organization in America, focused on the work of political de-polarization. Along the way he and Bridget have a fascinating conversation about his experience being raised by a mother who’s a liberal black Democrat from inner city LA and father who’s a conservative white Republican from Tennessee, and how his white father emphasized the greatness of black culture in the context of the greatness of America and made him proud of being a black man. He and Bridget bond over their similar experiences dealing with their parents’ divorces. They cover how you can engage conflict without suffering the debilitating impact of hatred in your own psychology, being chameleons growing up and learning to integrate all the different parts of themselves as they grew older, how important it is to see the human behind the opinion – especially when it’s one you don’t agree with, what’s truly noble and redeemable in all of our American traditions, and whether Trump is actually racist.

Thomas Chatterton Williams (Losing My Cool, Self-Portrait In Black and White) talks with Bridget from France and discusses the view of America from another country, the European response to Covid-19 vs. the US’s, and why the Unites States plays a central role in the imagination of the whole world. Thomas explains how he wound up “accidentally” writing a memoir about the difference between the black culture his dad grew up in from the one he grew up in, America’s historic attitude about race, and how his having his daughter who “looks like a Swedish child” led him to reassess what he’d previously written and his thoughts about the “construct” of race. He and Bridget cover why the hyper focus on racial difference is not the way to get past our divisions, the narcissism in the idea that whiteness in itself is responsible for all that’s wrong, why emigrating to another country was the hardest thing he’s ever done, and what he misses most about America.

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. The Casual Bigotry of Elite Black Americans: National Museum of African American History & Culture

 

Today I came upon a tweet by Byron York that startled me. York’s tweet included an attachment from the National Museum of African American History & Culture describing what they call “Aspects and Assumptions of Whiteness & White Culture in the United States”. Let me post Mr. York’s tweet below.

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Black Reparations Parsed

 

michelmond / Shutterstock.com
In the midst of today’s heightened racial unrest, the calls for black reparations have become more insistent. In their recent book, From Here to Equality: Reparations for Black Americans in the Twenty-First Century, William A. Darity Jr. and A. Kirsten Mullen write: “Racism and discrimination have perpetually crippled black economic opportunities.” The offenses cited are slavery, legal segregation under Jim Crow, and more contentiously, “ongoing discrimination and stigmatization.” Their book figured centrally in a recent article in the New York Times Magazine by Nikole Hannah-Jones, who launched the highly controversial 1619 Project. In her piece, “What is Owed,” she makes this claim:

Reparations are not about punishing white Americans, and white Americans are not the ones who would pay for them. It does not matter if your ancestors engaged in slavery or if you just immigrated here two weeks ago. Reparations are a societal obligation in a nation where our Constitution sanctioned slavery, Congress passed laws protecting it and our federal government initiated, condoned and practiced legal racial segregation and discrimination against black Americans until half a century ago. And so it is the federal government that pays.

Member Post

 

The Manhattan Project was simple. The Manhattan Project, of course, was the United States’ effort to develop and build nuclear weaponry. It was a simple effort in that its scope was primarily confined to the realms of math, physics, and manufacturing. Preview Open

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This week on “The Learning Curve,” Cara and Gerard are joined by Prof. Carole Boston Weatherford, a New York Times best-selling children’s book author, and Caldecott Honor Book and Coretta Scott King Award winning biographer of Harriet Tubman and Fannie Lou Hamer. They discuss the opportunity presented by the national response to the George Floyd tragedy for ultimately improving race relations. Prof. Weatherford discusses the importance of teaching about the lives of African-American heroes and heroines, and their forgotten struggles to overcome adversity; what it means to teach a more complete and less romanticized history that is more inclusive; and how improved curricula, higher expectations, and a diverse faculty can more effectively inspire all children to strive to overcome adversity and empathize with people. She discusses her views on blues music as African-American language in song, and jazz as “the rhythm of daily life”; and how the sophisticated, improvisational artistry of jazz reflects African-Americans’ everyday experiences. Lastly, Prof. Weatherford offers a reading of her poem, “SNCC,” from her biography of 1960’s voting rights advocate Fannie Lou Hamer.

Story of the Week: Protesters in Massachusetts, Virginia, and other parts of the country have vandalized and removed statues of explorer Christopher Columbus this week due to his association with colonization and violence against Native Americans. Will these actions spark constructive dialogue about which historical figures society glorifies and marginalizes, or will they merely rile up Italian-Americans and create further tension? As school winds down for the summer and focus shifts to reopening plans this fall, a new Pioneer Institute report with ASU Prep Digital shows that online learning can work for most special needs students, and highlights the importance of meeting the diverse needs of all learners no matter the circumstances.

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Member Post

 

I admittedly tread on treacherous ground here. My wife doesn’t know I’m about to share this story. She would likely spike this post if she did. It’s really personal. My wife is very upset over the coverage and reaction of the George Floyd murder. But not for the reason you think. Preview Open

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Member Post

 

There’s really no other conclusion. Democrats are racists. They hate black people. Slavery. Jim Crow. Segregation. The projects (aka “not in my neighborhood”). Welfare and the destruction of the family. Abortion (founded to reduce the black numbers and continuing today to keep “those people” to a manageable size – see projects). Unrestricted immigration (millions of […]

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