Tag: Quote of the Day

Quote of the Day: Peggy Noonan on Guns

 

Last weekend, in the Wall Street Journal, Peggy Noonan asked a rhetorical question: Why do Americans have so many guns? Here is how she answered her own question:

Americans have so many guns because drug gangs roam the streets, because they have less trust in their neighbors, because they read Cormac McCarthy’s “The Road.” Because all of their personal and financial information got hacked in the latest breach, because our country’s real overlords are in Silicon Valley and appear to be moral Martians who operate on some weird new postmodern ethical wavelength. And they’ll be the ones programming the robots that’ll soon take all the jobs! Maybe the robots will look like Mark Zuckerberg, like those eyeless busts of Roman Emperors. Our leaders don’t even think about this technological revolution. They’re too busy with transgender rights.

Member Post

 

In the matter of reforming things, as distinct from deforming them, there is one plain and simple principle; a principle which will probably be called a paradox. There exists in such a case a certain institution or law; let us say, for the sake of simplicity, a fence or gate erected across a road. The […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Join Ricochet for Free.

Quote of the Day: Arms and the Vote

 

“You mean, the people are armed?” Prince Bentrik was incredulous.

“Great Satan, aren’t yours?” Prince Trask was equally surprised. “Then your democracy’s a farce, and the people are only free on sufferance. If their ballots aren’t secured by arms, they’re worthless.”

Quote of the Day: Spiro Agnew and How Some Things Never Change

 

On this day 44 years ago, a Vice President of the United States resigned and pled no contest to a felony charge. Spiro Agnew is remembered best for a quote against the press, calling them “nattering nabobs of negativism.” But as we look back, that was not his only delightful quote that still applies today, only moreso.

Perhaps the place to start looking for a credibility gap is not in the offices of the Government in Washington but in the studios of the networks in New York!

QOTD: Swift and Sure, 18th Century Satire

 

“‘For,’ said he, ‘as flourishing a Condition as we may appear to be in to Foreigners, we labour under two mighty Evils: a violent Faction at home, and the Danger of an Invasion, by a most potent Enemy, from abroad. As to the first, you are to understand, that for about seventy Moons past there have been two struggling Parties in this Empire, under the names of Tramecksan and Slamecksan, from the high and low Heels on their Shoes, by which they distinguish themselves. It is alledged, indeed, that the high Heels are most agreeable to our ancient Constitution: But, however this be, his Majesty has determined to make use only of low Heels in the Administration of the Government, and all Offices in the Gift of the Crown, as you cannot but observe; and particularly, that his Majesty’s Imperial Heels are lower at least by a Drurr than any of his Court (Drurr is a measure about the fourteenth Part of an Inch). The Animosities between these two Parties run so high, that they will neither eat, nor drink, nor talk with each other. We compute the Tramecksan, or High-Heels, to exceed us in number; but the Power is wholly on our side. We apprehend his Imperial Highness, the Heir to the Crown, to have some tendency towards the High-Heels; at least we can plainly discover that one of his Heels is higher than the other, which gives him a Hobble in his Gait.'” — Jonathan Swift, Gulliver’s Travels.

Jonathan Swift was born on November 30, 1667, just two months after the death of his father. His family was poor, and he was raised in Ireland by his wealthy uncle, who paid for Swift’s schooling, intending him to follow his uncle’s footsteps into the legal profession. But fate had something else in mind for the young scholar, and a few years after the Glorious Revolution of 1688 put William and Mary on the throne, Swift moved to England to work as private secretary to Sir William Temple. Over the next decade and a half, he pursued a peripatetic career, moving back and forth between Ireland and England, becoming an ordained Anglican priest, and starting to write. He also met Esther Johnson, a housekeeper’s daughter who was fifteen years younger than Swift, and who would become the love of his life.

By the first decade of the eighteenth century, Swift was publishing his early parody pieces, much to the dismay of the Church of England which did not find them amusing or instructive at all, and when the Tories fell from power in 1713, Swift moved back to Ireland as the dean of St. Patrick’s cathedral. It was during this time of his life that Swift wrote his most famous work, Travels into Several Remote Nations of the World, in Four Parts. By Lemuel Gulliver, First a Surgeon, and then a Captain of Several Ships, known more familiarly as Gulliver’s Travels. The book exhibited the same biting wit, clever parody, and anti-establishment tone of his earlier works, and so very quickly became a best-seller, as it has been ever since.

Member Post

 

Today on this date in 1890, Julius Henry Marx (a.k.a. Groucho) was born on the upper east side of Manhattan above a butcher’s shop. It couldn’t have been a kosher butcher’s shop since a ham was born just upstairs. Young Julius was born with heavy eyebrows and a mustache while preferring a cigar to a […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Join Ricochet for Free.

Member Post

 

“The great and important duty which is incumbent on Christians, is to guard against all appearance of evil; to watch against the first risings in the heart to evil; and to have a guard upon our actions, that they may not be sinful, or so much as seem to be so. It is true, the […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Join Ricochet for Free.

Member Post

 

The Quote of the Day is the easiest way to start a fun conversation on Ricochet. You don’t have to be intelligent, pithy, or eloquent yourself. You can bask in the wisdom of another, someone who went through the hard knocks of acquiring that wisdom, pithiness, and eloquence. Or, you can even quote your favorite […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Join Ricochet for Free.

Quote of the Day: Democrats

 

“Why has the Democratic Party become so arrogantly detached from ordinary Americans? Though they claim to speak for the poor and dispossessed, Democrats have increasingly become the party of an upper-middle-class professional elite, top-heavy with journalists, academics and lawyers.”

— Camille Paglia

Quote of the Day: On Wheat and Chaff

 

Few American writers of the twentieth century so embody the quotably pungent and pithy in their prose as does Dorothy Rothschild Parker.

Google her name, and her often caustic, witty, gems just tumble out at you: “The cure for boredom is curiosity. There is no cure for curiosity.”–“If you want to know what God thinks of money, just look at the people He gave it to.”– “She runs the gamut of emotions from A to B” (this from a review of a Katharine Hepburn performance in a Broadway play)–“The first thing I do in the morning is brush my teeth and sharpen my tongue.”–“What fresh hell is this?”–“Brevity is the soul of lingerie.”–“I don’t care what anybody says about me as long as it isn’t true.”–“Of course I talk to myself. I like a good speaker, and I appreciate an intelligent audience.” And perhaps my favorite, which I can’t even include here (no, it’s not the one about the girls at the Yale prom).

But the DP quote I’ve chosen for today is one I particularly love. It comes, as did so much of her output, from a review of an item of cultural interest, in this case, a particular book:

Quote of the Day: Rainbow

 

“And it shall come to pass, when I bring a cloud over the earth, that the bow shall be seen in the cloud: and I will remember my covenant, which is between me and you and every living creature of all flesh; and the waters shall no more become a flood to destroy all flesh. And the bow shall be in the cloud; and I will look upon it, that I may remember the everlasting covenant between God and every living creature of all flesh that is upon the earth.” — Genesis 9:14-16, KJV

Felt like going old school today.

Member Post

 

With a bunch of thanks to Mr. Brad Tupi from Pittsburgh, who said this in a letter to the editor of the Wall Street Journal on August 19-20. The cause of the Left’s disease isn’t that it took identity politics too far-that is just one symptom.  The root cause is that the left has abandoned […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Join Ricochet for Free.

Member Post

 

A person of sense but limited stamina naturally attempts to avoid too much study in modern philosophy, such as is offered by contemporary establishment academia, on the basis of empiric observation that, for any but the strongest, it can lead to misery and despond. A person with sensibility will perhaps be intrigued by this present […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Join Ricochet for Free.

Quote of the Day – Modern Living

 

“We’re told cars are dangerous. It’s safer to drive through South Central Los Angeles than to walk there. We’re told cars are wasteful. Wasteful of what? Oil did a lot of good sitting in the ground for millions of years. We’re told cars should be replaced with mass transportation. But it’s hard to reach the drive-through window at McDonald’s from a speeding train. And we’re told cars cause pollution. A hundred years ago city streets were ankle deep in horse excrement. What kind of pollution do you want? Would you rather die of cancer at eighty or typhoid fever at nine?” — P.J. O’Rourke

It is amazing how well we live today. It is more amazing how much some people resent that. What is even more amazing is that most of these people do not resent that they are living well – they seem to resent that others live well. The Al Gores and James Hansens of this world live large while wanting everyone else to live a peasant existence. To quote Glenn Reynolds: “I’ll believe it is a crisis when they behave like it is a crisis.” Until then, sod off swampy!