Tag: Quote of the Day

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Quote of the Day: Inexperience

 

“In America the young are always ready to give those who are older the full benefits of their inexperience.” — Oscar Wilde

Are we ever seeing examples of this over the last few weeks. In Seattle, the young (and privileged) set up an autonomous zone that immediately devolves from their intended socialist paradise to something out of Lord of the Flies. They tear down statues of Grand and abolitionist Union leaders because of slavery or something. They threaten to topple a statue of Lincoln – paid for and erected by former slaves because white racism, or something. They demand everyone think just like they do because truth, or something.

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Quote of the Day: Fatherhood

 

“Son, there are times a man has to do things he doesn’t like to, in order to protect his family.” – Ralph Moody

Tomorrow is Fathers’ Day. Fathers are pretty well despised in today’s popular culture. Probably for the reason given in this quote. A father does things he does not like to do to protect his family.

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. QOTD: Henry Flipper Looks Forward

 

MY four years were drawing to a close. They had been years of patient endurance and hard and persistent work, interspersed with bright oases of happiness and gladness and joy, as well as weary barren wastes of loneliness, isolation, unhappiness, and melancholy. I believe I have discharged—I know I have tried to do so—every duty faithfully and conscientiously. It had been a sort of bittersweet experience, this experimental life of mine at West Point. It was almost over, and whatever of pure sweetness, whatever of happiness, or whatever reward fortune had in store for me, was soon to become known.—Henry Ossian Flipper, the Colored Cadet at West Point

Henry Ossian Flipper was the first black man to graduate from the United States Military Academy at West Point. He did so on this date in 1877. He had been born a slave twenty-one years before that. He was commissioned a second lieutenant in the Buffalo Soldiers. While he had troubles and faced prejudice, he went on to a long professional career in various capacities with governments and as an engineer. He was also an author, writing his first book the year after graduation while at Fort Sill.

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Quote of the Day: Freedom of Speech

 

“Freedom of speech and thought matters, especially when it is speech and thought with which we disagree. The moment the majority decides to destroy people for engaging in thought it dislikes, thought crime becomes a reality.” – Ben Shapiro

Are we there yet? Has thought crime become a reality? It seems that way. Our freedoms are now under siege as they never have been before. An NFL quarterback is made to apologize for issuing a patriotic thought. A distinguished legal scholar at a New York University is fighting to keep his job because he expresses doubts about the BLM movement. And people everywhere are made to deny what they are seeing before their eyes — that they are witnessing rioting and looting, not peaceful protests.

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Quote of the Day: Unhappiness with Good News

 

“There are some Americans out there who are actually unhappy when what normal people would think of as good news is revealed. They are upset and even in denial when it turns out that a horrific gang rape at U. Va or by the Duke Lacrosse team never happened, or that a bunch of white kids didn’t surround and threaten a “Native American elder,” or that the Trayvon Martin case didn’t involve a white man shooting a black kid unprovoked, or that a deranged Israeli, not a dangerous white supremacist cabal, was responsible for a series of bomb threats to Jewish institutions, because they want reinforcement for their worldview that demands that the U.S. be a dystopian hatefest. These are some of the worst people in the United States.” – David Bernstein

We got some really good news yesterday: unemployment is way down.

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Quote of the Day: Barbarians

 

“Every society rests on a barbarian base. The people who don’t understand civilization, and wouldn’t like it if they did. The hitchhikers. The people who create nothing, and who don’t appreciate what others have created for them, and who think civilization is something that just exists and that all they need to do is enjoy what they can understand of it—luxuries, a high living standard, and easy work for high pay. Responsibilities? Phooey! What do they have a government for?

“And now, the hitchhikers think they know more about the car than the people who designed it, so they’re going to grab the controls.

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Quote of the Day: Courage

 

“A decline in courage may be the most striking feature, which an outside observer notices in the West in our days. The Western world has lost its civil courage, both as a whole and separately, in each country, each government, each political party, and, of course, in the United Nations. Such a decline in courage is particularly noticeable among the ruling groups and the intellectual elite, causing an impression of loss of courage by the entire society. Of course, there are many courageous individuals, but they have no determining influence on public life.” – Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn

How much of our government today is marked by a lack of courage? We see it most clearly in the response to the COVID-19 epidemic. The states, counties, and cities whose leaders are most frightened are the ones maintaining the lockdown longest. Especially the politicians who fear the electorate and mistrust the common sense of the average person.

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Member Post

 

Today our Quote of the Day is the result of my stumbling upon a horrible feminist post on Reddit. As you know by now, I am the opposite of a feminist. It triggered me, and I was forced to take to my fainting couch. Haha no not really, because I’m a Conservative and I don’t […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Quote of the Day: Government

 

“I believe that all government is evil, and that trying to improve it is largely a waste of time.” – H.L. Mencken

We have certainly seen several illustrations this week demonstrating Mencken was a man ahead of his time.

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Quote of the Day: Theory and Practice

 

“For real people, if something works in theory, but not in practice, it doesn’t work. For academics, if something works in practice, but not in theory, it doesn’t exist.” — Nassim Nicholas Taleb

Have we seen this today, in recent events? I think so. It is not a new phenomenon. In the late 17th and 18th century, scurvy was a menace during long sea voyages. Oddly enough, preventative treatment was known in the late 16th and early 17th centuries: citrus and teas made from spruce needles. However, these cures were rejected as “folk medicine” by the medical academics of the day because it clashed with then-accepted medical theory. Instead, useless but “scientific” remedies, such as vinegar and malt were substituted, the folk remedies forgotten, and generations of sailors suffered scurvy. After all, the science was settled. Not until just after the American Revolution did Dr. James Lind discover (or rather rediscovered) the benefits of citrus, and the scourge was ended.

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. QOTD: The tally stick

 

See, our tally stick is whittled nearly end to end;
delicate as scrimshaw, it would not bear you up.
Regrets have polished it, hand over hand.
Yet, let us take it up, and as our fingers
like children leading on a trail cry back
our unforgotten wonders, sign after sign,
we will talk softly as of ordinary matters,
and in one another’s blameless eyes go blind.

from The tally stick by Jarold Ramsey

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Quote of the Day: Quarantine vs. Tyranny

 

“Quarantine is when you restrict movement of sick people. Tyranny is when you restrict the movement of healthy people.” – Meshawn Maddock, a protest organizer with the Michigan Conservative Coalition

We have seen this phrase pop up frequently since two weeks ago when Maddock was quoted as saying this by a news outlet. The reason why is the phrase rings true. While there was justification for a lockdown on March 15 (the last day I was able to attend a Sunday church service), that justification has long passed. We were told that we needed to lockdown for a month because it would keep hospitals from being overwhelmed and allow us to build up hospital capacity. That has been achieved. Any further lockdown is indeed tyranny.

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Quote of the Day: Central Planning and Coronavirus

 

“The great myth of central planning is that capital can be rationally allocated through the elimination of profit and incentive. And that will just magically produce the right outcomes for society.” – Tom Luongo

The Chicom Coronovirus lockdown is a great illustration of this quote. The government is deciding what businesses are “essential” and “nonessential.” The reality is under normal circumstances (under circumstances when the government is not picking winners and losers that is) no private-sector job is nonessential. A profit-making company cannot afford nonessential employees. Too many of them and the business goes broke.

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Dorothy Parker: The Woman with an Acid Pen

 

In the roaring ’20s, a decade full of clever chaps like Robert Benchley, Groucho Marx, and Noel Coward, no writer had a sharper and more acid wit than Dorthy Parker.

Parker made her living as an all-r0und professional writer, but she’s largely remembered today for her acerbic wit and for her role as a charter member of New York’s famous Algonquin Round Table, a group of writers and actors that met daily for lunch at the Algonquin Hotel from 1919 until about 1929.

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Quote of the Day: Absurdities and Atrocities

 

“Those who can make you believe absurdities can make you commit atrocities.” – Voltaire

We can see an illustration of this quote in the behavior of certain politicians over the last month. The idea that preventing people from buying seeds or child seats can somehow prevent the spread of a disease is absurd, as is the belief that people sitting in their automobiles at a church parking lot are somehow at more risk of spreading disease than those sitting in their cars eating a meal ordered at a Sonic.

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Quote of the Day: Kimberley Strassel on how D’s and R’s respond to the Wuhan Coronavirus Crisis

 

From the Friday, April 3 column entitled “Pols Face a Coronavirus Test”:

Example: The Trump administration spent this week distributing ventilators, standing up small-business loans, dispatching hospital ships, erecting alternate care facilities, explaining virus modeling, revamping regulations to keep truckers on the road, and plastering the airwaves with information about hygiene and social distancing. Speaker Nancy Pelosi spent this week setting up a new House committee to investigate Donald Trump.

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Quote of the Day: The Importance of Work

 

“Leisure time is only leisure time when it is earned; otherwise, leisure time devolves into soul-killing lassitude. There’s a reason so many new retirees, freed from the treadmill of work, promptly keel over on the golf course: Work fulfills us. It keeps us going.” – Ben Shapiro

Shapiro hits on one of the main reason the loss of jobs is so devastating. Even if the government were able to reimburse the wages of all of those thrown out of work, life would still be unsatisfying for many. They have not earned that leisure time. It feels wrong, and they feel marginalized. They feel unfulfilled.

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Quote of the Day: Problems

 

“Isn’t it wonderful; if you have a few problems, you have trouble, but if you have a whole lot of problems, they start solving each other.” – H. Beam Piper, Ministry of Disturbance

Problems? We all have problems today. Enough problems that this aphorism (which Piper used some variant of in several stories) begins to apply. If you have enough problems you can put them together to start solving themselves. It is a principle I have cheerfully, indeed ruthlessly, applied since my early teens when I first came across it in one of Piper’s sci-fi novels.

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Quote of the Day: The Novelty of Our Situation

 

“In other words, do not let us begin by exaggerating the novelty of our situation. Believe me, dear sir or madam, you and all whom you love were already sentenced to death before the atomic bomb was invented: and quite a high percentage of us were going to die in unpleasant ways. We had, indeed, one very great advantage over our ancestors—anesthetics; but we have that still. It is perfectly ridiculous to go about whimpering and drawing long faces because the scientists have added one more chance of painful and premature death to a world which already bristled with such chances and in which death itself was not a chance at all, but a certainty.” — C.S. Lewis

While Lewis wrote this in regard to the then-new threat of atomic warfare, it seems remarkably appropriate to today’s Chinese coronavirus scare. While we may be reacting to the threat in novel ways, the threat itself is as old as mankind. Yet death is inevitable once birth has occurred. Through our panic (as others have noted on Ricochet) some may be hastening their own deaths or the deaths of others.

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Quote of the Day, March 21: A Sign of the Times…Job Posting

 

The Department of Feminist Studies at the University of California, Santa Barbara, invites applications for a tenure-track position at the rank of assistant professor in queer migrations. Research may focus on trans/queer geographies, racialization, decoloniality, and flows of people, ideas, and objects across borders. Of special interest to us are innovative methodological approaches to gender and sexual citizenship, discourses of belonging, and human rights in the context of state and social violence against LGBTQ communities in historical or contemporary national and transnational frames.

Residents of California, may I present your tax dollars at work.

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