Tag: QOTD

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Quote of the Day: Equivalences

 

“To say that the CIA and the KGB engage in similar practices is the equivalent of saying that the man who pushes an old lady into the path of a hurtling bus is not to be distinguished from the man who pushes an old lady out of the path of a hurtling bus: on the grounds that, after all, in both cases someone is pushing old ladies around.” – William F. Buckley

The left is very invested in false equivalences nowadays. We have seen example after example in the impeachment hearings over the last weeks. Context matters, and the motivations for actions also matter. As Buckley illustrates an action that is generally unacceptable – pushing old ladies around – may become justifiable in the context of a situation.

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Quote of the Day: Experience

 

“Experience is a hard teacher because she gives the test first, the lesson afterwards.” — Vernon Sanders

Boy, isn’t that true. I cannot think of all of the times I flunked a test I did not know I was taking. Fortunately, even though I paid in hide a few times, my misjudgments have never resulted in death, mine or others. Yet.

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Quote of the Day: Laughter

 

“Humanity has unquestionably one really effective weapon—laughter. Power, money, persuasion, supplication, persecution—these can lift at a colossal humbug—push it a little—weaken it a little, century by century, but only laughter can blow it to rags and atoms at a blast. Against the assault of laughter nothing can stand.” — Mark Twain

Do we want to marginalize woke-scolds? Laugh at them. Make them figures of fun. Similarly for Progressives. (Indeed, Progressives realize this too. Alinsky’s fifth rule states “Ridicule is man’s most potent weapon.”)

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Quote of the Day: Being Woke

 

“The goal of our culture now is not the emancipation of the individual from the group, but the permanent definition of the individual by the group. We used to call this bigotry. Now we call it being woke.” – Andrew Sullivan

I know it is Andrew Sullivan. And he helped build the culture he is decrying in this quote. But a true statement is a true statement. If you are woke, you are a bigot. Even Andrew Sullivan realizes that.

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. QotD: Power and Marginalization

 

If you want to know who actually has the power in our society and who is actually marginalized, ask which ideas get you sponsorships from Google and Pepsi and which get you fired. – Kevin Williamson

We saw some illustrations of that this week. Whistle-blowing is good if it hurts President Trump or any conservative, but it is bad if it is done against Progressive bastions (the mainstream media). If a Republican refuses to concede a close election this is an indication the Republicans cannot accept defeat. If a Democrat loses a close (or even not-so-close) election, refusal to concede is taking it to the man, or noble resistance. And heaven forbid a doula claim a man cannot give birth.

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Quote of the Day: Price Controls

 

“Four things have almost invariably followed the imposition of controls to keep prices below the level they would reach under supply and demand in a free market: (1) increased use of the product or service whose price is controlled, (2) Reduced supply of the same product or service, (3) quality deterioration, (4) black markets.” – Thomas Sowell

Did anyone notice California’s governor imposing statewide rent control on September 10? It was done to make housing more affordable and more available. It was sold as a means of fixing the homeless crisis. Of course, the cities that already had rent control are the cities with the greatest housing shortages and highest rents, but why let reality intrude on a great theory.

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Member Post

 

St Vincent of Lerins (died around 450 AD) reflecting on development of tradition, in Commonitorium: What else has ever been attempted by the decrees of councils except this, that what before was believed in simplicity, this same truth should afterward be believed more earnestly; that what before was preached more indifferently, this same truth should […]

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Quote of the Day: The Benefit of the Law

 

Roper: So now you’d give the Devil benefit of law!

More: Yes. What would you do? Cut a great road through the law to get after the Devil?

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Promoted from the Ricochet Member Feed by Editors Created with Sketch. Quote of the Day: G.K. Chesterton on Generations

 

“I believe what really happens in history is this: the old man is always wrong; and the young people are always wrong about what is wrong with him. The practical form it takes is this: that, while the old man may stand by some stupid custom, the young man always attacks it with some theory that turns out to be equally stupid.”
– G.K. Chesterton, Illustrated London News, June 3, 1922

A constant in electoral politics is pitting the generations against each other. Many Boomers thought the Greatest Generation was too staid and traditional. Gen Xers found Boomers self-indulgent and profligate. Since Generation X is famously a forgotten generation, Millennials content themselves with bashing the Boomers as well.

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Quote of the Day: Tolerance and Religion

 

“The frustrating thing is that those who are attacking religion claim they are doing it in the name of tolerance, freedom, and openmindedness. Question: Isn’t the real truth that they are intolerant of religion? They refuse to tolerate its importance in our lives.”
– Ronald Reagan

We saw that illustrated by Robert “Beto” O’Rourke this last Thursday when he threatened to strip churches of tax-exempt status if they did not perform same-sex “marriages,” and the Democrats cheered. This bigoted, intolerant position was (of course) framed as a means of fighting bigotry and intolerance.

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Member Post

 

So the other day I quoted Samuel Johnson. From that, I suppose it naturally follows that I should mine through the inextinguishable wisdom available from some of Ricochet’s favorite artists. Of course, I’m speaking of hip hop’s Public Enemy. Beware of the handWhen it’s coming from the LeftI aint trippin,’ just watch ya step.Can’t truss […]

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Quote of the Day: Happy Henry Mühlenberg Day!

 

“JULY 4 [1776]. Today the Continental Congress openly declared the united provinces of North America to be free and independent states. This has caused some thoughtful and far-seeing melancholici to be down in the mouth; on the other hand, it has caused some sanguine and short-sighted persons to exult and shout with joy. It will appear in the end who has played the right tune. This remains as a comfort to believers: There is One who sits at the rudder, who has the plan of the whole before him, to whom all power in heaven and one earth is given, and who has never yet made a mistake in his government. He it is who neither sleeps nor slumbers and who has asked his people to pray, ‘Hallowed by thy name, thy kingdom come, thy will be done.'”
Diary of a Colonial Clergyman, by Heinrich Melchior Mühlenberg

Though you may not know the name, Heinrich Melchior Mühlenberg is kind of a big deal among Lutherans. Born in Einbeck in Hanover in 1711, Mühlenberg was destined to become the patriarch of Lutheranism in North America. After studying at the University of Göttingen, he was ordained into the ministry in 1739, and accepted a call overseas to the German-speaking Lutherans in Pennsylvania in 1742.

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Member Post

 

No cause more frequently produces bashfulness than too high an opinion of our own importance. He that imagines an assembly filled with his merit, panting with expectation, and hushed with attention, easily terrifies himself with the dread of disappointing them, and strains his imagination in pursuit of something that may vindicate the veracity of fame, […]

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Member Post

 

The Earth is the cradle of humanity, but mankind cannot stay in the cradle forever. – Konstantin Tsiolkovsky Konstantin Tsiolkovsky was a largely self-taught scientist born in 1857 who pioneered most of the basic concepts in astronautics. He developed the rocket equation, among other things. He was focused on space flight before we had achieved powered […]

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Quote of the Day: Faith

 

“Economics is not the central problem of this century. It is a relative problem which can be solved in relative ways. Faith is the central problem of this age. The Western world does not know it, but it already possesses the answer to this problem – but only provided its faith in God and the freedom He enjoins is as great as Communism’s faith in Man.” — Whittaker Chambers, Witness

These words remain applicable today, and yet so many of our current political debates focus on economics. As a parent of children attending public schools, I see faith in God being deliberately replaced with faith in man. Schools eagerly preach the religion of environmentalism under the guise of science, or English, or whatever other subject they can tangentially relate to its themes.

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Quote of the Day: Heretics and Converts

 

“As the old saying has it, the left looks for heretics and the right looks for converts, and both find what they’re looking for. The effect is no doubt subliminal, but people who treat you like crap are, over time, less persuasive than people who don’t. If people on the Left are so unhappy about how many former allies are changing their views, perhaps they should examine how those allies are treated.” – Glenn Reynolds (Instapundit)

Reynolds wrote this over a decade ago, during the early years of Instapundit. Yet I believe it remains true today, and is one reason I believe the Democrats will lose the 2020 election bigly. They are alienating too many people, and alienating them at an increasing rate. They are attacking their own allies, too, over minor differences in dogma.

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Quote of the Day: Winning and Losing

 

“Winning is habit. Unfortunately, so is losing.” – Vince Lombardi

With a new election coming up we can see plenty of illustrations of this principle – with both parties.

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Quote of the Day: Liberty

 

“If liberty means anything at all, it means the right to tell people what they do not want to hear. “– Eric Blair (writing as George Orwell)

Which is another proof woke culture is anti-liberty and at its heart fascistic. Not only do they not want to hear what they do not want to hear – they want no one else to hear what woke culture does not want to hear. They want you to have the freedom to agree with them and no other freedom of speech, press, or thought. Ironically, Blair’s words are written on the side of BBC HQ in London. Whether it did in the past, the BBC doesn’t really mean it today.

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Quote of the Day: Do Something

 

“Those who cry out that the government should ‘do something’ never even ask for data on what has actually happened when the government did something, compared to what actually happened when the government did nothing.” – Thomas Sowell

Another helping of Sowell food. We have been hearing a lot about “doing something” in the aftermath of a tragedy, catastrophe, or a disaster. Of course the responsibility for doing something is always assigned to the government, rather than taking individual responsibility. Yet the truth is, nine times out of ten, nothing need have been done outside of enforcing existing laws or exercising prudence.

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