Tag: QOTD

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. QotD: Agnes on the Cowcatcher

 

July 1st is Canada Day. The first Prime Minister of Canada was John Alexander MacDonald, who shepherded the process towards their being considered an independent country. His second wife was named Agnes.

Tanglefoot was a band formed by schoolteachers, who wrote much of their own material, and much of it reflected history. For today’s Quote of the Day, I give you their song about the formation of Canada and the railroad built to bind the country.

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Brothers and sisters, we are responsible to safeguard these sacred freedoms and rights for ourselves and our posterity. What can you and I do? First, we can become informed. Be aware of issues in your community that could have an impact on religious liberty. More

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Quote of the Day: Just a Tool

 

“Masks are a tool, useful in the right application. They’ve become a political fetish object for reasons that have nothing to do with their utility.” Prof. Glenn “Instapundit” Reynolds

I never expected to hear this much debate over masks outside of a superhero comic convention. Posts here bounce back and forth between people who wear masks and those who oppose them. Then you have people who are constantly watching for someone to not wear their mask. It’s no longer just a layer of absorbent material worn over the nose and mouth, it is a symbol of fighting against the pandemic — a literal virtue signal.

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Quote of the Day: Inexperience

 

“In America the young are always ready to give those who are older the full benefits of their inexperience.” — Oscar Wilde

Are we ever seeing examples of this over the last few weeks. In Seattle, the young (and privileged) set up an autonomous zone that immediately devolves from their intended socialist paradise to something out of Lord of the Flies. They tear down statues of Grand and abolitionist Union leaders because of slavery or something. They threaten to topple a statue of Lincoln – paid for and erected by former slaves because white racism, or something. They demand everyone think just like they do because truth, or something.

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Quote of the Day: Fatherhood

 

“Son, there are times a man has to do things he doesn’t like to, in order to protect his family.” – Ralph Moody

Tomorrow is Fathers’ Day. Fathers are pretty well despised in today’s popular culture. Probably for the reason given in this quote. A father does things he does not like to do to protect his family.

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Quote of the Day: Freedom of Speech

 

“Freedom of speech and thought matters, especially when it is speech and thought with which we disagree. The moment the majority decides to destroy people for engaging in thought it dislikes, thought crime becomes a reality.” – Ben Shapiro

Are we there yet? Has thought crime become a reality? It seems that way. Our freedoms are now under siege as they never have been before. An NFL quarterback is made to apologize for issuing a patriotic thought. A distinguished legal scholar at a New York University is fighting to keep his job because he expresses doubts about the BLM movement. And people everywhere are made to deny what they are seeing before their eyes — that they are witnessing rioting and looting, not peaceful protests.

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Quote of the Day: Unhappiness with Good News

 

“There are some Americans out there who are actually unhappy when what normal people would think of as good news is revealed. They are upset and even in denial when it turns out that a horrific gang rape at U. Va or by the Duke Lacrosse team never happened, or that a bunch of white kids didn’t surround and threaten a “Native American elder,” or that the Trayvon Martin case didn’t involve a white man shooting a black kid unprovoked, or that a deranged Israeli, not a dangerous white supremacist cabal, was responsible for a series of bomb threats to Jewish institutions, because they want reinforcement for their worldview that demands that the U.S. be a dystopian hatefest. These are some of the worst people in the United States.” – David Bernstein

We got some really good news yesterday: unemployment is way down.

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Quote of the Day: A Woman’s Function

 

To be Queen Elizabeth within a definite area, deciding sales, banquets, labors and holidays; to be Whiteley within a certain area, providing toys, boots, sheets, cakes. and books, to be Aristotle within a certain area, teaching morals, manners, theology, and hygiene; I can understand how this might exhaust the mind, but I cannot imagine how it could narrow it. How can it be a large career to tell other people’s children about the Rule of Three, and a small career to tell one’s own children about the universe? How can it be broad to be the same thing to everyone, and narrow to be everything to someone? No; a woman’s function is laborious, but because it is gigantic, not because it is minute. I will pity Mrs. Jones for the hugeness of her task; I will never pity her for its smallness.” — G.K. Chesterton

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Quote of the Day: Barbarians

 

“Every society rests on a barbarian base. The people who don’t understand civilization, and wouldn’t like it if they did. The hitchhikers. The people who create nothing, and who don’t appreciate what others have created for them, and who think civilization is something that just exists and that all they need to do is enjoy what they can understand of it—luxuries, a high living standard, and easy work for high pay. Responsibilities? Phooey! What do they have a government for?

“And now, the hitchhikers think they know more about the car than the people who designed it, so they’re going to grab the controls.

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Quote of the Day: Courage

 

“A decline in courage may be the most striking feature, which an outside observer notices in the West in our days. The Western world has lost its civil courage, both as a whole and separately, in each country, each government, each political party, and, of course, in the United Nations. Such a decline in courage is particularly noticeable among the ruling groups and the intellectual elite, causing an impression of loss of courage by the entire society. Of course, there are many courageous individuals, but they have no determining influence on public life.” – Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn

How much of our government today is marked by a lack of courage? We see it most clearly in the response to the COVID-19 epidemic. The states, counties, and cities whose leaders are most frightened are the ones maintaining the lockdown longest. Especially the politicians who fear the electorate and mistrust the common sense of the average person.

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Quote of the Day: Government

 

“I believe that all government is evil, and that trying to improve it is largely a waste of time.” – H.L. Mencken

We have certainly seen several illustrations this week demonstrating Mencken was a man ahead of his time.

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Quote of the Day: Blaming and Finding Fault

 

“Let those who are fond of blaming and finding fault while they sit safely at home ask, ‘Why did you not do thus and so?’ I wish they were on this voyage. I well believe that another voyage of a different kind awaits them, or our faith is naught.” — Christopher Columbus, Lettera Rarissima to the Sovereigns, Fourth Voyage (7 July 1503), quoted in Admiral of the Ocean Sea, by Samuel Morison

Columbus’ choice of language was more genteel and diplomatic than Morison’s paraphrase of his sentiment: in other words, they can go to hell. Teddy Roosevelt echoed the sentiment more than 400 years later in his “man in the arena” speech. Men of great accomplishment have surely been frustrated by their critics throughout the ages. Columbus was well aware of his contemporary critics, but he could not have known how many people would be denouncing him more than 500 years after his death. I find it reassuring that he anticipated all the elite progressives and liberal arts students who protest any recognition of his accomplishments, while enjoying the relative safety and comfort of modern life. And it’s a fitting rejoinder for many people today who write tweets or columns, but never shoulder the burden of taking action.

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Quote of the Day: Theory and Practice

 

“For real people, if something works in theory, but not in practice, it doesn’t work. For academics, if something works in practice, but not in theory, it doesn’t exist.” — Nassim Nicholas Taleb

Have we seen this today, in recent events? I think so. It is not a new phenomenon. In the late 17th and 18th century, scurvy was a menace during long sea voyages. Oddly enough, preventative treatment was known in the late 16th and early 17th centuries: citrus and teas made from spruce needles. However, these cures were rejected as “folk medicine” by the medical academics of the day because it clashed with then-accepted medical theory. Instead, useless but “scientific” remedies, such as vinegar and malt were substituted, the folk remedies forgotten, and generations of sailors suffered scurvy. After all, the science was settled. Not until just after the American Revolution did Dr. James Lind discover (or rather rediscovered) the benefits of citrus, and the scourge was ended.

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Quote of the Day: Quarantine vs. Tyranny

 

“Quarantine is when you restrict movement of sick people. Tyranny is when you restrict the movement of healthy people.” – Meshawn Maddock, a protest organizer with the Michigan Conservative Coalition

We have seen this phrase pop up frequently since two weeks ago when Maddock was quoted as saying this by a news outlet. The reason why is the phrase rings true. While there was justification for a lockdown on March 15 (the last day I was able to attend a Sunday church service), that justification has long passed. We were told that we needed to lockdown for a month because it would keep hospitals from being overwhelmed and allow us to build up hospital capacity. That has been achieved. Any further lockdown is indeed tyranny.

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Quote of the Day: Central Planning and Coronavirus

 

“The great myth of central planning is that capital can be rationally allocated through the elimination of profit and incentive. And that will just magically produce the right outcomes for society.” – Tom Luongo

The Chicom Coronovirus lockdown is a great illustration of this quote. The government is deciding what businesses are “essential” and “nonessential.” The reality is under normal circumstances (under circumstances when the government is not picking winners and losers that is) no private-sector job is nonessential. A profit-making company cannot afford nonessential employees. Too many of them and the business goes broke.

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. QOTD: The Forest Service vs Your Soul

 
“The Forest Service is worse than the Internal Revenue Service. Those Revenue fellows are only after the money, while our Feds are running a fulltime all-out campaign for your soul.”
That’s a quote from A River Went Out of Eden by Chana B. Cox, @iwe’s mother
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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Quote of the Day: Absurdities and Atrocities

 

“Those who can make you believe absurdities can make you commit atrocities.” – Voltaire

We can see an illustration of this quote in the behavior of certain politicians over the last month. The idea that preventing people from buying seeds or child seats can somehow prevent the spread of a disease is absurd, as is the belief that people sitting in their automobiles at a church parking lot are somehow at more risk of spreading disease than those sitting in their cars eating a meal ordered at a Sonic.

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Quote of the Day: The Importance of Work

 

“Leisure time is only leisure time when it is earned; otherwise, leisure time devolves into soul-killing lassitude. There’s a reason so many new retirees, freed from the treadmill of work, promptly keel over on the golf course: Work fulfills us. It keeps us going.” – Ben Shapiro

Shapiro hits on one of the main reason the loss of jobs is so devastating. Even if the government were able to reimburse the wages of all of those thrown out of work, life would still be unsatisfying for many. They have not earned that leisure time. It feels wrong, and they feel marginalized. They feel unfulfilled.

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Quote of the Day: Problems

 

“Isn’t it wonderful; if you have a few problems, you have trouble, but if you have a whole lot of problems, they start solving each other.” – H. Beam Piper, Ministry of Disturbance

Problems? We all have problems today. Enough problems that this aphorism (which Piper used some variant of in several stories) begins to apply. If you have enough problems you can put them together to start solving themselves. It is a principle I have cheerfully, indeed ruthlessly, applied since my early teens when I first came across it in one of Piper’s sci-fi novels.

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