Tag: Putin

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According to MSNBC “Contributor” Malcolm Nance, Dr Hanson is a Russian Spy on the order of Aldrich Ames. Now that explains a lot. What a fiendish, subtle devious man VDH is, convincing us he was a real conservative, concerned about our nation, when all along he was nothing but a pawn of Putin… More

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One of the reasons that films like the original Independence Day (1996) movie seem ridiculous to me is that the aliens fight Earthlings such in such a conventional manner…with flying craft that’s barely more sophisticated and maneuverable through the Grand Canyon than an F/A-18 Hornet fighter jet. If a superior-intelligent alien race really traversed the […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Kompromat

 
screen-shot-2016-10-22-at-13-31-51
How FANCYBEAR hacked Podesta’s Gmail (as well as Powell’s, Breedlove’s, and many hundreds more) — linking the DCLeaks, G2 and Wikileaks ops. From https://twitter.com/ridt.

I can’t recall which thread gave rise to this question, but I remember that some of you wanted to know what evidence there was that Russia was behind the DNC hack.

Thomas Rid, a professor in the Department of War Studies at King’s College London, is among other things the author of “Attributing Cyber Attacks,” which he wrote for the Journal of Strategic Studies in 2015. He’s written a very clear and readable article for Esquire about Putin, Wikileaks, the NSA and the DNC e-mail hack. It won’t take you but ten minutes to read, but I’ll pull out some of the highlights:

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Before the first debate Claire Berlinski (@claire) asked the Ricochet community what if anything Trump could say that would change the mind of a “NeverTrumper” like me about him. At the time I said I did not know what he could say. That his actions and statements both from his past and from the campaign […]

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I just finished listening to a segment from the John Batchelor from earlier this week (links below). It was an interview – one in a series – with Stephen F. Cohen who is a Russia scholar with a very dim view of how our relationship is going. The basic point was that we are “slouching towards […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Syria, Russia, and Trump

 

I’m not sure how much news about Aleppo is filtering through the non-stop election coverage. Although my sense was that Gary Johnson did, indeed, know what Aleppo was (and just flubbed the question through some kind of inattention), that kind of inattention is only possible if the subject just isn’t something you think about all that much.

I don’t know whether he’s typical of American voters. It’s not something the next president will be able to ignore, though, that’s for sure. Aleppo’s now a hellscape reminiscent of the Battle of Stalingrad. Even by the horrifying standards of the Syrian war, the past week’s events Aleppo represent a new level of depravity. Russian and Syrian government airstrikes killed more than 300 people, most of them civilians and many of them children; more than 250,000 civilians are trapped. They’re under attack by the Syrian military and by thousands of foreign militiamen commanded by Iranian Revolutionary Guards, Hezbollah fighters, and Russian ground troops; and they’re under bombardment by heavy Russian and Syrian air power — the most sustained and intense bombardment since the beginning of the war. A genuine Axis of Evil, if anything ever was, has emerged from this. Most of the civilians are, according to the Violations Documentation Center in Syria, being killed by Russians. I don’t know how reliable they are, so take this with the usual caveats:

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. The Spartan Regime: Its Character, Origins, and Grand Strategy

 

TheSpartanRegimeImageTwo hundred fifty years ago, Jean-Jacques Rousseau set out to compose a history of Sparta. In the introduction that he drafted, he observed:

The greatest inconvenience associated with my endeavor is that here one sees men who resemble us almost in nothing, who seem to us to be outside of nature — perhaps as much because we are in that state ourselves as because they are in fact there. Their crimes inspire in us horror. Sometimes their virtues themselves make us shiver. Because we are weak and pusillanimous in good times and in bad, everything that bears a certain character of force and vigor seems to us impossible. The incredulity that we parade is the work of our cowardice rather than that of our reason.

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Promoted from the Ricochet Member Feed by Editors Created with Sketch. The Pro-Putin Party

 

PUTIN_RUSOThere have been some pretty unsettling remarks made throughout this election cycle that go far beyond the Twitter tirades that receive most of the public’s attention.

Hillary Clinton has been under fire the last several weeks for referring to half of Donald Trump‘s supporters as “a basket of deplorables.” Many are rightly calling this a far worse hit on voters than Romney’s “47%” remark that drew so much attention in 2012.

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. April Glaspie, Signalling, and the Baltics

 

Haines-Little-Green-MenYou’ll all remember the story of hapless April Glaspie, often blamed — unfairly, in my view — for the First Gulf War. She was accused of giving Saddam Hussein the very mistaken impression that the United States would remain neutral should he invade Kuwait. The transcripts of the meeting vary in their particulars, but according to The New York Times, this is what she told him:

But we have no opinion on the Arab-Arab conflicts, like your border disagreement with Kuwait. I was in the American Embassy in Kuwait during the late 1960s. The instruction we had during this period was that we should express no opinion on this issue and that the issue is not associated with America. James Baker has directed our official spokesmen to emphasize this instruction. We hope you can solve this problem using any suitable methods via Klibi [Chedli Klibi, Secretary General of the Arab League] or via President Mubarak. All that we hope is that these issues are solved quickly.

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Update on the Bukovsky Trial

 

BukI just received this press release from Vladimir Bukovsky. You may recall that he sued Britain’s Crown Prosecution Service for libel over a statement it issued in April announcing that he was being charged with “making” child pornography. Bukovsky strenuously denied the allegations, and took the unusual step of issuing a writ against the CPS in the high court in London. Unfortunately — but unsurprisingly — the court has found against him:

The CPS has made no allegations of Vladimir Bukovsky’s involvement in sexual abuse of children, the High Court has ruled today. The judgement of Mr. Justice Warby in Mr. Bukovsky’s libel claim against the CPS states: “Mr Bukovsky has not been charged with or accused of being a participant in or present at the scene of any child sex abuse, or of taking photographs of such abuse. The CPS has not alleged, and does not allege, that he was guilty of or reasonably suspected of any such conduct.

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Trump: Putin’s Manchurian Candidate?

 
The Daily Beast
The Daily Beast

In light of the DNC hack (which digital signatures point to Russia), we would expect the Democrats to divert attention from their embarrassing emails confirming Trump and Bernie’s accusations of a ‘rigged system’. Schadenfreude for the Right, indeed.

However, as the Left’s automatic impulse to shift the narrative of DSW’s fall from grace, they are pointing to shinier squirrels which may have a more significant impact on the 2016 election. Their story is slowly gaining an audience and being analyzed by many on the center-right, although don’t expect to hear much about it this week during the DNC celebration of government largesse.

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. The DNC Attack and Putin

 

All signs point to Russia being behind the DNC hack, reports Wired:

Not reacting politically to the DNC hack is setting a dangerous precedent. A foreign agency, exploiting Wikileaks and a cutthroat media marketplace, appears to be carefully planning and timing a high-stakes political campaign in the United States that could escalate next week, next fall, or next time. Trump, ironically, is right: the system is actually rigged.

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. The Week in Europe

 

The GOP convention has probably drowned out the news from Europe in the US, but it’s been a dramatic week. I’ve been unable to take my eyes or my mind off events in Turkey. I wrote this piece for City Journal:

… It will be many years, if ever, before we fully understand what just took place. But some of the conclusions hastily drawn in the Western media make no sense. Many commentators have been quick, for example, to accept Gülen’s intimation that the scale of the purge indicates the coup attempt was staged by Erdoğan himself, in some kind of Turkish Reichstag fire. True, lists of people to purge were prepared long in advance, but that doesn’t mean that Erdoğan staged the coup. It’s no surprise to anyone in Turkey that these lists were ready; the government had already said as much. To understand why, you’d need to be familiar with events in Turkey from the time the AKP came to power to the present, as well as the way, beginning in 2012, the AKP visibly, explosively, and publicly fell out with Gülen’s flock. The president has taken advantage of the coup plot to accelerate a purge, but it doesn’t mean he staged it. Nor is it evidence for Gülen’s involvement, though it would be credulous to dismiss that idea out of hand.

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Syria Can’t Wait Until 2017

 

Charles Lister, a senior fellow at the Middle East Institute and the author of “The Syrian Jihad,” has written an article in the Daily Beast warning that the growth of al Qaeda in Syria is a problem that can’t wait for the next administration. “The principal benefactor of Assad’s survival is not Assad, nor Russia, Iran, Hezbollah or even ISIS,” he writes. “[I]t is Al Qaeda.” Lister has been warning for some time now that Jabhat al-Nusra, which is an affiliate of al-Qaida, will be more difficult to uproot than ISIS. Even if Americans aren’t paying much attention, the United States and its allies are now in an urgent battle for influence with Nusra, which is the most effective and successful al Qaeda affiliate to date.

On Wednesday, Putin and Obama agreed to a proposal for coordinated action against al Qaeda in Syria, involving enhanced intelligence sharing about its positions. Lister believes this is exactly the wrong approach — the polar opposite of the right approach. “Jabhat al-Nusra’s entire modus operandi has been designed to insure itself and ultimately benefit from just such a scenario,” he writes.

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. The KGB Never Forgets and Never Forgives

 

In 1977, Tom Stoppard wrote a play dedicated to Soviet dissidents Vladimir Bukovsky and Viktor Fainberg. It is set in a Soviet mental hospital. Two men, both named Ivanov, share a cell. Alexander Ivanov is a dissident who cannot be released until he admits that he is mad and agrees that all of his statements against the government were the product of his mental illness. His cellmate, the other Ivanov, is mad. He believes he is conducting a symphony orchestra, which he hears in his mind.

In 2009, the play was revived at the National Theatre, in London. It received lukewarm reviews. “Unpacking the setting,” wrote critic Mark Espiner, “leads you into the heart of the problem — that it is dated.” Ian Shuttleworth dismissed it on similar grounds. “To put it harshly, this bleak, fantastical indictment of the Soviet Union’s use of psychiatric hospitalisation against dissidents is a play for yesterday.”

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Bukovsky and the Insult of Indifference

 

A peculiar kind of despair follows a catastrophe. There is no special word for this despair, though there should be; it requires a name all its own. It involves such associated concepts as bitterness, resilience, justice, trauma, insult, and injury. It is the state of mind that arises when one has suffered an event that shatters the soul. That is half of it. But the other half involves the way the world perversely refuses to understand. Having experienced the injury of loss, the victim then discovers the insult of indifference. The rest of the world continues to go about its business, blithely forgiving and forgetting, or never having known at all. Auden’s poem captures some of this: About suffering they were never wrong …

Because I’m a journalist, sometimes I receive letters from people who want the world to know that a terrible thing has happened to them. They cannot understand why no one cares. The letters are heartbreaking. Usually, there’s not much I can do. Although the story means everything to the person who has written to me, to the rest of the world, it means nothing — it is sad, but it is not significant, politically or historically. It is a human-interest feature at best.

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Trump strong like bull! American politics is so “my esteemed colleague” this and “my esteemed colleague” that. Trump breath of fresh air like way too much vodka. Trump shoot Russian media mogul and not to lose the votes! More

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Forgive me if I’m stating the obvious, but I just realized exactly what Donald Trump is. He is not Tea Party. He is not establishment. He is not a Democrat. He is probably not a white supremacist. I think he is a nationalist, but we can be more specific than that. He is a nationalist […]

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Promoted from the Ricochet Member Feed by Editors Created with Sketch. Russia Withdrawing from Syria. Your Move, Amreeka…

 

In a surprise move, Russia has announced that it will be withdrawing its troops from Syria. From the Guardian:

“I consider the objectives that have been set for the Defence Ministry to be generally accomplished,” Vladimir Putin announced matter-of-factly on Monday evening, announcing the imminent withdrawal of Russian troops from Syria.

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