Tag: public sector unions

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So the saga of the Chicago Teachers Union versus Mayor Lightfoot and Chicago Public Schools continues. Some random thoughts on what’s going on. Where we left off: on January 24th, 10,000 teachers for kindergarten- 8th grade were supposed to report to their classrooms. They failed to do so at the CTU’s urging and set off […]

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Chicago: Teachers Won’t Come Back

 

Preschool teacher Kirstin Roberts teaches students outside Brentano Elementary Math & Science Academy since it isn’t “safe” inside.

As a former employee of CPS (Chicago Public Schools, for the uninitiated), I have been watching as the saga of the “reopening of schools” has been unfolding here. I still receive all the CPS emails, as well as those from the Chicago Teachers Union (CTU). The competing narratives about going back to work have been fascinating and I thought I’d do a little write-up here. Feel free to chime in if you’ve been following and have thoughts about how this is going down…

CPS planned on a hybrid re-opening scheme this fall but the CTU protested that it wasn’t safe so CPS went remote. Throughout that time, CPS provided updates about the HEPA filters they installed in the schools, cleaning procedures, the polling from the community who wanted to return to in-person teaching, etc. All this led to January’s phased re-opening (note: the CTU did not endorse this plan)- on January 4, 5,800 teachers were meant to return to prep for the January 11 start date for pre-kindergarten age children and only 49.7% came back. Some taught remotely, some taught even outside the building in 27°F weather (see the photo above). And the CTU said that teachers who did not want to return had the Union’s full support. CPS and the city said they would face “progressive discipline”- i.e., risk being fired.

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I’m sure many of you listen to the EconTalk podcast (if you don’t, you absolutely should.)  I thought this episode was great and this excerpt perfectly characterized the power situation in this country, especially the lack of meaningful reform, especially when public sector unions and the entrenched bureaucracy are involved. “Back in the old days […]

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Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America hail the Supreme Court’s ruling that non-members of public sector unions do not have to pay dues.  They also shudder as liberal protesters get up close to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and his wife, Transportation Secretary Elaine Chao.  And they’re not going to miss New York Rep. Joe Crowley after his stunning defeat in a New York congressional primary, but the woman who defeated Crowley is an avowed socialist who wants to abolish Immigration and Customs Enforcement and pass single-payer health care.

This week on Banter, AEI Resident Scholar and deputy director of AEI’s Education Policy Studies Nat Malkus joined the show to discuss how a ruling in favor of Janus might affect unions in states where agency fees apply. Malkus’s work at AEI focuses on K-12 education, specifically school finance, charter schools, school choice, and the future of standardized testing. Before joining AEI, Malkus was a senior researcher at the American Institutes for Research. Learn more about the case and explore the potential effects of the expected ruling using Malkus’s interactive tool at the links below.

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Daniel DiSalvo joins Brian Anderson to discuss public-sector unions, freedom of speech, and the upcoming Supreme Court case, Janus v. AFSCME.

The Supreme Court will hear oral arguments in Janus next week. If the justices rule for the plaintiffs, employees of state and local governments across the country will be able to opt out of paying union fees. Public unions are often powerful political players, and a sharp drop in funding or membership could deal a heavy blow to their influence.

It’s “Fair Share” Union Dues Time Again

 

I’m a professor of physics and astronomy.  Sadly, my university has a unionized faculty, which I have declined to join.  As the precedent stands now, after Abood v. Detroit Board of Education (1977), the union still gets to charge me a fee every year for what they consider to be “collective bargaining” costs.  By default, they will also charge me a fee for their politicking (that brings it to the full union membership cost), and if I don’t want to pay this, I have to “object in a timely manner,” and I have to do it each year.  I can’t tell them that I permanently object.

There’s an annual mailing that tells me what the fees are and the deadline for objecting.  They’ve played loose with this in the past.  Many, many years, especially early on, they didn’t send me anything at all.  We few non-union faculty had to email each other and see if anyone had found the deadline, the mailing address, and the fee amounts.  One year, they mailed it a month late, and it arrived after the deadline they’d set up for my response.  (To their credit, they did accept my objection that year.)

Public Unions May Get Their Due

 

Mark Janus, who works for the state government in Illinois sued AFSCME, saying he does not agree with its positions and should not be forced to pay fees to support its work..

Public employee unions may have fleeced taxpayers one time too many. Two court cases involving Illinois residents resisting forced union fees and representation may give the US Supreme Court the opportunity to restore employee and taxpayer freedoms.

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I’m a college professor in a school with a unionized faculty, in a non-right-to-work state.  So the union thugs get to seize a few hundred dollars from my salary, but according to a 1976 Supreme Court case, they can’t make me pay the costs of their “political” activities.  Still, the old case says I have […]

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My son was registering to take a driving road test. It was almost impossible to see the available dates. Once he registered for the test, it was impossible to change his registration without losing his registration. The first available date was months away. My son wanted to know why it was so absurdly difficult to register.  […]

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As the father of three very bright, ambitious girls, the thought of gender biased wage discrimination is vexing.  I’m a businessman – been waging economic war from recession to recession over the past nearly forty years – so I’ve seen the rise of the two earner family and the female worker.  One of my best […]

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