Tag: Public School

Libby Emmons joins host Ben Domenech to discuss her son’s personal experience in the New York City public school system and how it pushes the left’s narrative of systemic racism and white privilege. Emmons is a senior editor at The Post Millennial and senior contributor at The Federalist.

Emmons argued that the public school curriculum accomplishes nothing in its teaching of white privilege other than discouraging children from hoping for change. Schools ought to promote ideas of kindness and equality rather than divide children by informing specific children of their inherent racism.

On this episode of The Federalist Radio Hour, Rachel Campos-Duffy joined Culture Editor Emily Jashinsky to discuss the left’s long-time influence on children and how that is being revealed in today’s culture. Campos-Duffy is a Fox News Contributor and author of “Paloma Wants to Be Lady Freedom.”

Campos-Duffy argued that the greatest weapon to fight the left’s influence in American culture is intentional parenting. As liberalism is promoted subtly in every area of society from reality television to children’s books, she said, parents need to actively teach their children to nullify what they learn from the world.

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If I were being responsible right now, I would be just finishing an essay analyzing Brodsky’s cultural influences in Russian (as it is I’m 70% done with the essay and 100% done trying to connect my “ы”s to my “т”s while maintaining the proper stem), or reviewing my infinitives for my return to Hebrew tomorrow. […]

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Ray Domanico joins City Journal associate editor Seth Barron to discuss charter schools in New York City, the growing protests by education workers across the country, and Democrats’ weakening support for charters.

In teachers’ unions protests from West Virginia to California, activists claim that the growth of charters has come at the expense of district schools.

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With the current frenzy and media buzz surrounding the Central American caravan, which is tirelessly marching north to the US-Mexico Border, political pundits from both sides of the aisle are weighing in with a bevy of talking points. In addition, conspiracy theories are being bounced around with reckless abandon as to who is funding the march: is […]

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There’s No Such Thing as a “Public” School

 

shutterstock_356921591Perhaps the most pervasive myth about our nation’s education system is the notion that “public schools have to take all children.” Last year, when criticizing charter schools that she claimed, “don’t take the hardest-to-teach kids,” Hillary Clinton quipped, “And so the public schools are often in a no-win situation, because they do, thankfully, take everybody.” In fact, they do not. At best, so-called “public” schools have to take all children in a particular geographic area, although they can (and do) expel children based on their behavior. They are more appropriately termed “district schools” because they serve residents of a particular district, not the public at large. Privately owned shopping malls are more “public” than district schools.

This wouldn’t be a serious problem if every district school offered a quality education but, in fact, they do not. Rather, the quality of education that the district schools provide tends to be highly correlated with the income levels of the residents of those districts. As Lindsey Burke of the Heritage Foundation and I noted last year, our housing-based system of allocating education leads to severe inequities:

There is a strong correlation between these housing prices and school performance. In nearly all D.C. neighborhoods where the median three-bedroom home costs $460,000 or less, the percentage of students at the zoned public school scoring proficient or advanced in reading was less than 45 percent. Children from families that could only afford homes under $300,000 are almost entirely assigned to the worst-performing schools in the District, in which math and reading proficiency rates are in the teens.

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Xerox started the 5th Grade this morning. One of his classes is entitled 21st Century Technology. Obviously our school system is trying to reassure me that they are preparing my child, starting today, with all the technological skills he’ll need for the next 86 years. What would it have looked like had my grandfather’s generation […]

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Old-Timey Classroom

Compulsory Education: An Idea Whose Time Has Gone

 

It is a truth universally acknowledged that the US education system is messed up.  Opinions differ as to what — precisely — is wrong, what can be done to fix it, and whether fixing it is possible or even desirable.  One thing we should all be able to agree with is that making education compulsory in today’s world makes no sense.

I am not arguing that education is bad.  I am not arguing that attendance at school should be officially discouraged.  I am arguing (among other things) that forcing the most vulnerable in our society — the children of the poor in the inner cities and deprived rural areas — to attend institutions that we know do not work (or that are actively harmful) is a colossal waste of resources that actively prevents better things from happening.