Tag: public housing

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Fencing Off an Attractive Nuisance

 

People have been choosing to take some risk and expense to come to this country, rather than others closer to their home country, in part because our federal government, with the collusion of both major party establishments, allowed access to our social welfare system. It took President Trump to finally uphold our written laws, finally getting the Department of Homeland Security and Department of Justice personnel in place who would not continue resisting American law and the policy preferences of a presidential electoral majority.

On Friday, a short statement from the Press Secretary thanked the Supreme Court for doing the right thing and noting the new DHS rule on immigrants’ access to welfare programs will go into force this Monday.

More

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Autumn Colors: The Color of Law, an in-depth review

 

When people are free to associate as they please, we can’t be surprised if they sometimes self-segregate. People self-sort along many affinities, including ethnic affinities. This is what lawyers call de facto segregation, and it’s none of the law’s business. De jure segregation — segregation imposed by law, including segregation promoted by public policy — is, on the other hand, very much the law’s business.

In 1866, Congress passed a Civil Rights Act (the 1866 CRA) asserting the equal rights of blacks before the law, including property rights, and real-estate rights in particular. The 1866 CRA warned

More

Nicole Gelinas and Howard Husock join Seth Barron to discuss New York’s landmark rent-regulation law and its potential impact on housing in the city and state.

Lawmakers in New York recently passed the toughest rent-regulation law in a generation, imposing new restrictions on landlords’ ability to increase rents, improve buildings, or evict tenants. The bill made permanent the state’s existing rent regulations, meaning that future legislatures will find it harder to revisit the issue.

More

Nicole Gelinas joins City Journal associate editor Seth Barron to discuss Mayor Bill de Blasio’s State of the City address, his aspiration to run for president in 2020, and his attempts to position himself as a national progressive leader.

“There’s plenty of money in the city—it’s just in the wrong hands,” de Blasio proclaimed in a speech loaded with tax-the-rich rhetoric. Since his first mayoral election in 2013, de Blasio has tried to position himself as a revolutionary. But in practice, Gelinas notes, he is “more old-school, big-city Democratic pragmatist than new-school, Democratic Socialist of America.”

More

City Journal contributing editor Howard Husock joins associate editor Seth Barron to discuss problems at the New York City Housing Authority (NYCHA).

With some 400,000 residents, NYCHA is the nation’s largest public housing system. In recent years, news reports have documented extensive corruption at the agency along with chronic problems at NYCHA properties, including heating outages, broken elevators, high lead-paint levels, and vermin.

More

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Notice: Subsidized Housing Is Now Our Nanny

 

Sometime during the day on September 11, 2017, the following was posted on the public bulletin board in each of the four renovated buildings of the Little Jon Apartments, located at 1150-1156 Grand Drive, apts 1-32, Bigfork, MT. The font is size 20, so there are five pages tacked up. There is a note on the manager’s office door that she will be gone until September 18. Normal hours for the manager are from 10 am to 2 pm, Monday – Friday. There is a maintenance man from about 8 am to noon, also Monday-Friday.

There is no letterhead on the letter-size papers, there is no date, and there are no signatures. So the tenants do not know who wrote it or who posted it.

More