Tag: Public Health

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Public Health: Personal and Public

 

But for “public health,” you would not be reading these words. What follows starts with the personal and moves to the public, writ large. None of this should be controversial, as we all kind of know, or knew before the latest political gambit blasted through our collective memories and quickly polarized information into take it all for what it is worth.

The personal: But for public health, you would not be reading these words. My mother graduated from college with her BN in the late 1950s and went to work for the city of Philadelphia as a public health nurse. They called themselves “streetwalkers for the city of Philadelphia” because they walked a beat, bringing front-line medical care to poor sections of town. Mom was very tall for her era, a lean 5’11” white woman perfectly safe in an all-black neighborhood because the drug gangs had not yet arisen and driven off the old men who sat on every stoop keeping a watchful eye over “their nurse.”

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. COVID Congratulations!

 

Congratulations should be in order. The public health leadership asked us to give them time, to change our lifestyles to slow the progression of the disease. At great personal and social cost, we successfully flattened the curve. We bought time for the medical and research professionals to catch up. Outside of the New York City DeBlasio Debacle, we did what everyone was asking of us, and the results are showing it. This should be a time to start relaxing the lockdown, as it has succeeded outside of NYC. Tim Carney speaks for me here.

What’s utterly infuriated to me is that a lot of people are trying to claim this is a failure.

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Member Post

 

Fox News has posted both parts of the Sunday evening news event to its YouTube channel, making it available to everyone. The title make the theme, and President Trump’s focus, clear: “America Together: Returning to Work Town Hall.” The setting was amazing, reminding me of the old stories about President Reagan and Michael Deaver using […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Faces of “Non-Essential” Workers, and a Real “Public Health” Perspective

 

The White House web and social media team is whip-sharp. A day after the event with small businesses we get highlight videos out on the lawn. Even the images over the video titles paint a picture of America beyond the Beltway and the cultural capitals; just look at the line-up of the newest videos on the White House YouTube channel. We see the leader of the nation’s oldest public health service, the original federal force to stop infectious disease from entering and spreading through our port towns and cities. He, for the first time, provides inconvenient truth about the lethal side effects of the prescribed “public health” response to the pandemic. So, you get expert and human story arguments for reopening America as quickly and fully as possible.

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Coronavirus Briefing Programming Shakeup?

 

President Trump cut the daily briefing down to under 30 minutes on Friday. He then had the White House coronavirus task force take a break from briefing the public over the weekend. This was a good pause without important news to share. Now there has been some internal debate and a report that the scheduled briefing was off until later in the week. That report was then superseded by a report that the briefing is back on, scheduled to start at 5 pm Eastern Time. The live event clock is running on YouTube.

There is reporting, with Kayleigh McEnany on the record, that President Trump is retooling the event. It is probably time for recalibration and show formula freshening, judgments Donald J. Trump well understands. Whatever the case, this bit of off-screen drama should help hold or push viewership higher today. Substantively, today’s briefing is supposed to focus on a COVID-19 testing blueprint.

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. A Worthy Counterpoint by Emergency Room Doctors

 

One of my sisters is seeing a drastic slowdown in medical laboratory employment in Washington state. This is a predictable side effect of Dr. Fauci’s “public health” fraud, in which he has consistently misrepresented his unconstrained opinion from a mere slice of the whole field of public health as a fully informed recommendation.* This was simply not the case from Day One, with real public health including suicide prevention, substance abuse treatment and prevention, domestic abuse of every flavor, and prevention and early treatment of lethal diseases, including cancer, diabetes, heart diseases, and stroke. All of these are being predictably aggravated as known side effects of Fauci’s flawed prescription for treatment of the Chinese coronavirus.

We will, indeed, face a public health crisis as the country re-opens, as the healthcare system gets slammed by patients with delayed, worsened conditions at the same that everything from the local lab to the largest hospital scrambles to get staff back to work. Hear it from two ER doctors from California [hat tip to John Hinderaker at Power Line]:

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. AG Barr: Microbes Are the Real Threat, Not Climate Change

 

Attorney General Barr gave a substantial interview to Laura Ingraham on Thursday, April 8, 2020, and Fox News posted the portion of the interview that addressed the legal aspects of the government response to the Chinese Wuhan coronavirus. The politically hot portion, where Barr discussed the Durham investigation, is not posted publicly, requiring you to access the Fox website with a cable provider subscription. However, I was far more interested in the public segment, both for some reassurance about reestablishing our liberty and for the attorney general’s remarks about China and this virus. One remark struck a chord with my thinking about lessons learned from this shocking episode in our nation’s history.

I felt for a long time, as much as people talk about global warming, that the real threats to human beings are microbes, and being able to control disease. And that starts with controlling your border.

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Why Can’t We Be More Like Sweden?

 

Why can’t we be more like Sweden? Boy, I never thought I’d write those words, but I just did. You may ask in what way would I like the US to be more like Sweden? Well, it turns out they are the only country in the western world in which the government has not unilaterally shut down society in dealing with the coronavirus pandemic. Instead, they are just as interested in the economic, social, and psychological health of their citizens as they are in minimizing death and illness from the coronavirus. They are, therefore, treating their citizens as responsible, rational adults.

So far, Sweden has closed its borders to non-EU nations, has restricted public gatherings to less than 50 people, and, well, that’s about it for enforced prohibitions. Otherwise, the government has issued a number of advisories including asking people to practice social distancing, work from home if possible, students over 16 are asked to study from home, and those 70 and over are urged to self-isolate. Most private businesses remain open, restaurants still offer table service, private meetings and parties continue apace, and elementary schools are open. This does not mean that Sweden has not yet felt any pain from the virus. According to the NBC News article I linked to as of March 31, Sweden had recorded approximately 4,500 cases of coronavirus and 180 deaths therefrom.

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It sent a shudder up and down my spine today when I heard the malevolent partisan, US Rep. Adam Schiff (D-CA) echo something I called for a couple of days ago – a national commission on a path forward, and lessons learned, from Coronavirus. Except, we have VERY DIFFERENT approaches. Schiff wants Democrats in Congress […]

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Seth Barron and Nicole Gelinas discuss the coronavirus outbreak in New York City, the drastic measures being taken to control its spread, and the consequences of an economic slowdown for the city and state budget, the MTA, and New York residents.

New York—particularly New York City—is moving toward a full shutdown. Over the past week, schools have cancelled classes for an extended period and restaurants, bars, and many other businesses have closed. The historic losses in revenue to the city’s public-transit system alone will require a multibillion-dollar bailout, Gelinas believes. Read more of City Journal’s COVID-19 coverage here.

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. About Those Other Immunocompromised People?

 

While much is being made of the course of COVID-19 in Italy, it is worth remembering a couple of things as we focus our efforts in the United States. It appears that the same disease which we are now encountering found a very different population and medical readiness in Italy.

1. Italy has been committing demographic suicide for decades. Italy is down to 1.3 live births per woman. A major author wrote a decade ago that the big Italian family was a myth today, that an Italian child is most likely to grow up with no siblings and only one first cousin. So, it should be no surprise that Italy’s median age is already over 47. That is, Italy was already vulnerable to a disease that especially threatens the elderly because that is where their population has been shifting. The same holds for much of Europe.

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. President Trump’s Efforts to Protect American Workers from Coronavirus [Update 11 March]

 

President Trump made a preparatory announcement Monday evening that he would have a major address tomorrow on dramatic steps to support hourly wage earners, to ensure no one will have to choose between earning food and rent versus practicing good public health by staying home if they start to get sick. This, and the rest of the presentation led by Vice President Pence, conveyed seriousness and competence.

We were reminded again that young, healthy people are at greater risk of death by flu than coronavirus. AND. Young people need to be good family and friends, protecting their vulnerable elders by proper basic public health discipline. The task force promised clear, simple, specific written guidance for every American.

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Physician Joel Zinberg joins Brian Anderson to discuss the global coronavirus epidemic, public-health efforts to contain the virus’s spread, America’s medical supply-chain vulnerabilities, and more.

Confirmed cases of COVID-19, the disease caused by the new coronavirus SARS-CoV-2, have been identified in more than half of U.S. states. Globally, the number of coronavirus cases exceeds 100,000. “The New York experience to date suggests,” writes Zinberg, “that the disruptions this new virus causes—particularly to the availability of medical care, for any condition—may be more dangerous than the illness that it causes.”

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John Tierney joins Brian Anderson to discuss the campaign to ban the use of plastic products and the flawed logic behind the recycling movement—the subjects of Tierney’s story, “The Perverse Panic over Plastic,” from the Winter 2020 Issue of City Journal.

Hundreds of cities and eight states have outlawed or regulated single-use plastic bags. But according to Tierney, the plastic panic doesn’t make sense. Plastic bags are the best environmental choice at the supermarket, not the worst, and cities that built expensive recycling programs—in the hopes of turning a profit on recycled products—have instead paid extra to get rid of their plastic waste, mostly by shipping it to Asian countries with low labor costs. However, the bans will likely continue as political leaders and private companies seek a renewed sense of moral superiority.

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Member Post

 

Mark Davis, DFW area Salem Radio host, has been interviewing, via Skype, an American couple who were honeymooning on the Diamond Princess. Tyler and Rachel Torres are still doing well, and starting their new quarantine on one of the military bases in the San Antonio area. Tyler Torres has been updating a Reddit post, providing […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Coronavirus Update

 

President Trump’s team has come out with an initial briefing on the coronavirus outbreak, offering facts, cautions, and pushing back against panic. Johns Hopkins University has an excellent data visualization tool, constantly updating data on maps: “2019-nC0V Global Cases (by Johns Hopkins CSSE). CNET has a fact-based story, with lots of links, that is being regularly updated; it is now titled: “Coronavirus cases pass 11,000, US declares emergency: Everything we know.”

This was a display of competent communication to the American public, treated as adults. Dr. Redfield gave the numbers. Dr. Fauci then explained the question posed by people on Ricochet, including me: why is this different from the well-known annual deaths from the seasonal flu?* With the numbers and the differentiation in place, the briefers laid out a series of screening and quarantine steps that will go into full effect Sunday. Anyone who has been in the province where the outbreak started will be quarantined for 14 days, while those coming from other areas with known infections would be screened and then go into “self-quarantine.” They were also careful to speak of sympathy and compassion for the Chinese people who have been affected, directly or with family losses.

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Hold My Corona: Popping the Top on Preparedness

 

A brief dip into Twitter prompted a brief bit of research, and the results seemed worth sharing in the current news or hype cycle. Now I know, why on earth would I be on Twitter when there is talk of a new virus and we all know avian flu is supposed to be quite nasty? I was there for entirely other reasons when I stumbled upon a retweet of a professional pundit thinking he was offering a hot take. Hot tweet? More like steaming hot bird droppings.

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Member Post

 

July 1st was National Wine Cooler Day. This called to mind Bartles & Jaymes. Others hear “wine cooler” and think Bruce Willis for Seagrams Golden Wine Coolers. “Cooler” led to “cool” and then to “Kool,” and therein lies a policy puzzle. Reflecting on where the market has gone since those days, an apparent contradiction emerges […]

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Remembering the Fluoridated Water Wars

 
Flyer used by opponents to water fluoridation in Seattle 1952

If you’re of a certain age, you probably remember the fluoridated water controversy of the 1950s and early 1960s. I’m old enough to remember it and the other day I came across a brief discussion of the controversy in the book I was reading which whetted my appetite to see how accurate my memory of the issue was. What I found, I think, is that my memory of the controversy was only partially correct and incomplete. I thought I’d write about here at Ricochet because the actual story is 1) more interesting than the cartoon version I remembered, 2) I believe the story has been somewhat mythologized and distorted, and 3) the fluoridated water wars continued long after the early 1960’s and to a certain extent still exists.

Before I start, let me provide links to wikipedia articles for water fluoridation and for the fluoridated water controversy for your reference.

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Veneration and Vulnerability: Suicide in the Midst of Prosperity

 

Man does not live by bread alone. As bread was being earned at a record clip, and more people got off the dole, more people in their prime years cut their own lives short. Reflecting back on the U.S. military’s Herculean effort to end suicide in the service, an unwon battle, I am painfully aware there is no clear solution, no magic pill or words. And. I wonder if our changing societal habits and beliefs make vulnerable people more vulnerable.

2017 brought unbroken good economic news, and not just for stockholders. President Trump repeated at every occasion the good news for everyone, including demographic groups who had been lagging in employment. Wages started to rise. And in the midst of all this, the suicide rate increased to a 50-year peak.

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