Tag: Psychology

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Bubble-Wrapped Americans: How the US Became Obsessed with Physical and Emotional Safety

 

Bubble-Wrapped Americans: How the U.S. Became Obsessed with Physical and Emotional Safety“In America we say if anyone gets hurt, we will ban it for everyone everywhere for all time. And before we know it, everything is banned.” — Professor Jonathan Haidt

It’s a common refrain: We have bubble-wrapped the world. Americans in particular are obsessed with “safety.” The simplest way to get any law passed in America, be it a zoning law or a sweeping reform of the intelligence community, is to invoke a simple sentence: “A kid might get hurt.”

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You may think you know the stories of celebrity good deeds, but many examples of celebrity activism have gone horribly wrong. Dr. Cooper Lawrence, doctorate in the psychological study of celebrity culture, Gracie Award winning radio host, expert on MTV’s latest reboot of True Life and bestselling author of The Cult of Celebrity joins Carol Roth to talk about her upcoming book Celebritocracy: The Misguided Agenda of Celebrity Politics in a Postmodern Democracy.

In addition to covering how well-known celebrity activism programs went awry (e.g. Brad Pitt’s Make It Right Foundation; Live Aid), Cooper and Carol also discuss the rise of conservatism in Hollywood, why we treat celebrities as experts, and how celebrities set the global agenda. Plus, a “Now You Know” segment on dogs!

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Member Post

 

I’ve been listening to the audiobook of Rising Star: The Making of Barack Obama by David Garrow. If you are interested—very, very interested—in the granular details of Chicago politics in the 1980s, this is the book for you. The travails of this labor boss and that alderman and this activist priest and that graft-prone pol…. […]

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. It’s Not a Mask

 

I’m tired but can’t sleep; an experience everyone has at some point. But not everyone fears to close one’s eyes for what thoughts and dreams will rush into the void of sensation. Not everyone screams and mutters without making a sound in a familiar internal battle to “just shut up and go to sleep.”

Mental illnesses are as varied as personalities. We speak of symptoms and causes generally, as with diseases and purely physical ailments, because there is a utility in generalizations and playing the odds. But depression, crippling anxiety, compulsions, hallucinations, and other psychological oddities are not like a rash that looks the same on anyone.

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Silly Fears

 

All of us, regardless of how brave and rugged we may appear to others, have to deal with fears of all sorts throughout our lives. This post is about a fear I experienced. At its core, I think the fear I’ll be describing was about my being able to make it through what is a rite of passage in modern life: obtaining a Driver’s License and becoming a legal car driver.

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Bradley T. Klontz, Psy.D., CFP® is a Founder of the Financial Psychology Institute™, an Associate Professor of Practice in Financial Psychology at Creighton University Heider College of Business and a Managing Principal of Your Mental Wealth Advisors. Dr. Klontz has written five books on the psychology of money and sits with Carol to talk about why so many people hate rich people and how it is affecting envy politics. They also cover the psychology of wealth and what separates the ultra-wealthy from the middle class, stereotypes of the rich and how it holds people back and the psychological barriers to climbing the socioeconomic ladder.

You can connect with Dr. Klontz on Twitter and take a quiz to test your own money psychology on his website here. You can view his YouTube channel with videos about the psychology of wealth and money here.

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Perpetual Childhood of the Left

 

The last few years, in particular, have demonstrated the increasing polarization between the Left and Right. Demonstrations on college campuses, attacks on Donald Trump and his administration, far-reaching demands for others to succumb to their demands are endless. Many of us have tried to figure out ways to deal with these perpetual attacks: we’ve focused on how to speak to the Left, how to ignore their outrageous behavior, how to ridicule them, ways to fight back, and even how to change them. I think, however, we’ve been going about these efforts in the wrong way.

For the most part, the Right has offered solutions to deal with the demands of the Left, particularly with efforts to communicate with them or to use reason to show them the errors of their ways. Instead of solutions, I suggest we identify the source of their actions. Broadly speaking, they are trapped in Perpetual Childhood and are either unwilling or unable to find their way out. Let me provide an explanation of Perpetual Childhood, suggestions for its domination of so many on the Left, and general suggestions about where we can begin to deal with it. I’d like to begin with a practical list of attributes that I discovered. Think about people on the Left whom you know: do you think that any of these describe their thinking processes or behavior?

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Weeks ago, Ricochet members discussed talents and aptitudes. It is generally acknowledged that some people are better than others at particular skills and trades. But there was debate about nature versus nurture; if excellence is available to any practicioner with enough hard work and training. Today, let’s change the focus slightly. Can anyone be trained […]

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Sadly, I am not dating an identical twin. But LadyBrains’ podcast on twins reminded me of an old ponderance. Let me preface this by saying I have only ever met three pairs of identical twins and did not get to know them. The quandary goes two ways. More

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The following is a blurb from a newsletter I receive from the Arizona Attorney magazine: Mystery Writers rescind top award in Central Park 5 controversy More

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Get Off of Twitter

 

Who Are These People?

Do you get that impression? You’re listening to a podcast where they’re talking about this minute’s controversy. The podcaster laboriously stakes out a position in the center. “That’s reasonable,” you think. “I disagree but I can see how he’d get to that conclusion.” Then the podcaster goes on to say “Therefore the people who worship Trump as the twelfth Imam are wrong.” Wait, what? These pundits aren’t ever arguing with me, or with someone with an intelligent, nuanced opinion. They’re always arguing with Twitter.

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Ten years after the release of Nudge, the volume that popularized behavioral economics, Richard Epstein considers the shortcomings of the behaviorist school and the concept of “libertarian paternalism.”

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. “Deplorables” Pwning the Info Wars? Blame Canada!

 

Fans of Brexit’s Vote Leave campaign might remember Dominic Cummings’s reflections on the uses (and abuses) of data in politics. Cummings, often hailed as the mastermind behind Vote Leave, is an eloquent advocate for how getting the data science right contributed to Vote Leave‘s success, and he has a prickly – even “psychopathic” – reputation as a man who won’t suffer data-science fools (or at least those whom he deems foolish) gladly.

No doubt Cummings is right that charlatanism infests the ranks of political “data scientists”, but a more charitable term than “charlatanism” for much iffy “data science” might be “ad-hockery”: Adventurous wunderkinds promote ad-hoc heuristics which seem to work well enough, or which work until they don’t, or which may work, but which haven’t yet been vetted by systematic scientific reasoning. Ad-hoc heuristics aren’t inherently deceptive, or incapable of delivering what they claim to deliver. They deserve to be met with plenty of skepticism, of course, but skepticism needn’t always include suspicion of fraud.

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(NOTE: The Josiah Bartlett Center for Public Policy, New Hampshire’s original free-market think tank, publishes a weekly email newsletter. This week’s newsletter is a little rumination on partisanship. It’s posted below, in full, for your consideration. If you enjoyed this essay, you can sign up for the free Friday newsletter here.)   More

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. The Shooters: They Think They’re the Victims

 

As usual, the cries for getting to the root of these terrible mass shootings are dominating the media landscape. It’s guns! It’s mental illness! It’s the lone wolf syndrome! I’m not against trying to understand the perpetrators of these horrifying events. In fact, this post is an effort to look at one other possible source of the problem—although if there’s any truth to my proposition, dealing with it may be more complex than we can imagine.

The problem? The mentality of the shooter: his victimization and our indulgence of it.

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Member Post

 

People everywhere are debating Trump’s mental and emotional state. Is he delusional? Is he a narcissist? Why is he out of control? Doesn’t he have empathy? Is he cognitively impaired? The list goes on and on. Finally, why does he keep doing the things he does? It came to me in a flash: what people […]

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Every now and again I experience a powerful and strange sensation. A feeling really. Or is it an intuition? No, it’s a thought, but an unarticulated one. That’s not right either. Help! It’s a connection to a place. No, not a connection – it’s a yearning for a connection and an understanding which I feel […]

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Heather Mac Donald joins City Journal associate editor Seth Barron to discuss the dubious scientific and statistical bases of the trendy academic theory known as “implicit bias.” The implicit association test (IAT), first introduced in 1998, uses a computerized response-time test to measure an individual’s bias, particularly regarding race.

Despite scientific challenges to the test’s validity, the implicit-bias idea has taken firm root in popular culture and in the media. Police forces and corporate HR departments are spending millions every year reeducating employees on how to recognize their presumptive hidden prejudices.

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