Tag: Protests

Welcome to the Harvard Lunch Club podcast for November 15, 2016 it’s the Primal Scream edition of the podcast with your hosts, radio host Todd Feinburg and nanophysicist Mike Stopa. After six days we are all still screaming! Some scream for Donald Trump, some scream at Donald Trump and some scream, unaccountably, for ice cream.

This week on the podcast we will talk about more fallout from the election – from the enthusiastic protests of professional troublemakers and precious snowflakes to the promises, promises of Lena Durham and fellow travelers to leave the United States (don’t let the door hit you on the way out!); from the new odd couple in the White House – of course I am talking about Reince Priebus and Steve Bannon – to the nation’s courageous mayors who are reaffirming their commitment to stand in the schoolhouse doors and prevent the enforcement of Federal Law. We’ll talk about marches by the KKK that aren’t and Mike’s plan to use the purse strings of scientific research to force universities to ensure that their janitors and gardeners are all legal U.S. residents.

Member Post

 

Okay, I had settled down in my basement Mancave to watch the game between N.C. State (my alma mater) and Clemson (a team I always root for unless they are playing my school). Overall, the game was a defensive struggle. I knew my team was in for trouble when we had several illegal procedure penalties […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

This week on OppCast, we introduce listeners to our Comeback documentary series. With a focus on revealing the people and their stories at the ground level of America today, Comeback charts a course for a new way to address our nation’s toughest, most entrenched social problems.

My Afternoon with Donald Trump

 
img_1414
Prescott Valley Event Center just before the event began.

Donald Trump held a rally in Prescott Valley, AZ, this week. I figured that this more rural setting would feature less conflict than his many appearances in downtown Phoenix, allowing me to actually chat with some of Trump’s fans. I’ve been #NeverTrump since he descended the golden elevator last June, yet remain intrigued about his primary victory and the passion of his supporters.

Member Post

 

Some recent stories from Venezuela, Brazil, and Nigeria caught my attention; they have some interesting similarities. They are all oil-producing countries–with state-owned oil companies–that have been impacted by falling oil prices. And they are also reaching levels of political maturity where corruption is becoming more scandalous. In Venezuela, the opposition has resolved to oust Chavez’s successor Nicolas […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Member Post

 

Hope n’ Change is still no fan of Donald Trump, but we won’t stand idly by while he’s blamed for the increasingly violent protests being waged by the well-funded and entirely-orchestrated Left. What we’re seeing is the culmination of over seven years of anti-Republican hate speech from the Democrats and media. Members of the GOP […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Member Post

 

My family used to live smack dab in the middle of the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness, the largest wilderness area in the lower 48 states. And the Feds hated us. It was surely mutual. They pulled out no stops in trying to get us to leave and sell. They would, illegally, arbitrarily close off access by road […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Member Post

 

Civility was once a virtue. Nancy Pelosi, Alan Grayson, Barack Obama, and their ilk have decided that any virtue is overrated. It’s been cast aside as no longer useful and it has been replaced with contempt disguised as a distorted form of truth of the sort only the so-called oppressed and their fellow travelers can recognize. The Obama regime […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Member Post

 

Fellow Ricochetti, this is my final dispatch from Bucharest. Politics, such as it is, looks like its heading towards normality, such as we have it. The process of normalization is as full of disappointment as you would expect. There is very little reflection on the difference between the two states, though everyone can tell abnormal […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Member Post

 

I have written breathlessly, for my Ricochet audience, about the protests that led to the fall of the PM & his government, creatures of the party that nevertheless runs the bicameral legislature. There is great embarrassment in the country now. Again, there are thousands of people protesting in the streets of Bucharest, so rapidly successful […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Dispatch from Bucharest: Are we Having Another Revolution?

 

shutterstock_171837251Greeting from troubled Europe, Ricochet and America! Romania is in political turmoil. I write from calm, prosperous, populous Bucharest, probably the safest, least troubled capital in Europe. The protests and political turmoil here have nothing to do with immigration. Horror came over the weekend — I thank again my fellow Ricochetti who inquired as to my safety! — when a nightclub burned down; there are nearly three dozen dead, another seven dozen wounded. These poor souls have somehow been connected to a political anger that is rarely voiced and never articulated here.

It is no explanation, but the facts are as follows: Prime Minister Victor Ponta will resign. The leader of the party running the legislature — and, therefore, the government — made the announcement; Ponta himself has not yet spoken. In name, this is a socialist party or social-democrat party. In deed, it is the party of the oligarchy. The PM runs the country, but it is not clear on what leash he runs.

The man who runs Ponta’s socialist party is Mr. Liviu Dragnea, of whose criminal deeds no one is in doubt. He is a new, corrupt man of ambition representing one of the more important fiefdoms. He has risen through the party without any connection to popular politics. He resigned from government earlier this year — in happier times — because of an unfortunate indictment. This is not necessarily held against him by the oligarchy (I hope to explain the basics of Romanian politics in a sequel post). For now, let me give you a view of democratic politics here.

Decline of the American Protest

 

Bloody_Sunday-officers_await_demonstrators Reason reports on a “peaceful” protest against police abuse in Washington DC, telling us that “No fires were set or property damaged as far as I could tell. They succeeded in shutting down intersections as they went along, tailed by a cavalcade of police cars, lights flashing, there to keep the traffic in check.”

Color me deeply unimpressed.

Fifty years ago, the headline-grabbers called attention to themselves by dressing to the nines in order to get the snot beat out of them by racist cops who would not allow them to cross a bridge (over its pedestrian lane no less!). They did so in order to call attention to their dignity as citizens and the moral decrepitude of the officials, police officers, and posse members who assaulted and beat them.

Live from the Berkeley Riots

 

National media have carried photos and videos of the rioting in Berkeley over the weekend in response to the police brutality cases in Missouri and New York City. The protests were initially peaceful, well within what is protected by the First Amendment, and a reasonable response by a community that has grievances which should be addressed in the political process. But in the course of the protests, gangs of anarchists became the face of the occasion by destroying public and private property. They smashed store windows, looted stores like Trader Joe’s and Radio Shack, set fires in the streets, and tried to deface city hall and the police station. They attacked police officers and tried to destroy police vehicles. They stopped traffic on major streets and highways.

There is a terrible irony here. The activist left protesting the city government of Berkeley, Calif. is like communists holding a demonstration in front of the Kremlin or the Berlin Wall during the Cold War. If there is a left-wing paradise in the U.S., it is the People’s Republic of Berkeley. Just the other day, the city voted to tax sugar in sodas (to take a stand against “Big Soda”). It requires free marijuana for the homeless (don’t ask me about what we would call implementation problems). It has its own higher minimum wage. It thinks it is a nuclear-free zone. And so on. And then there was the 1960s.

Last Night In Boston

 

Coming home from work last night, I ran into the Boston protest over the decision not to indite any of the officers involved in Eric Garner’s arrest and death.

Stipulating that I’m as bad as anyone in estimating the size of crowds, there were certainly hundreds of people there (The Globe reports “thousands” at an earlier event, of which this one spun-out from). It was pretty chilly too: right around freezing. So far as I could see, the crowd was overwhelmingly college-aged, and disproportionally — though not majority — black.

Ferguson Goes Just as Expected

 

There were no surprises in Ferguson last night — not the grand jury’s decision, and not the riot that followed (I predicted both on NRO last month). Nor was there anything unexpected in the pitiful display of bellyaching by some in the media about the “flawed process” that produced an outcome other than the one they desired.

For all the time it took to reach their decision, my sense is that it wasn’t even a close case for the grand jurors. Either Darren Wilson was in legitimate fear for his life when he shot Michael Brown or he wasn’t. There was abundant evidence to suggest he was and very little that he wasn’t. The evidence proved the only criminal in the fatal encounter was Michael Brown, the not-so-gentle giant.

St. Louis Blues

 

In a post last week, I lamented the lack of outrage over a double-murder that had happened in the heart of downtown St. Louis. So consumed are the professionally and perpetually aggrieved by the death of Michael Brown — so focused are they on the rare event that is a police shooting — that they ignore the true menace to young black males in America: other black males.

Protesters came to St. Louis from all over the country this past weekend for what was billed as “Ferguson October,” a topic I addressed in my most recent piece on PJ Media. There is much that can and should be said about the people who organized and took part in the events, but one thing stands out: they have no sense of irony.