Tag: protest

Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America cheer UN Ambassador Nikki Haley in her firm-handed approach to the security threat posed by North Korea, specifically regarding China’s refusal to cooperate with UN resolutions against the isolated nation.  They also express frustration with national media over their lack of coverage of Rep. Steve Scalise’s condition as he returns to the ICU.  Finally, they highlight that most of those protesting Trump’s presidency are among the most wealthy in the DC area.

Sick Days, Vacation Days … Social Justice Days?

 

There’s a new trend in corporate benefits packages. Not satisfied with vacation days, sick days, and family and medical leave, many employers are now offering days off to protest the injustice of Trump’s America. From CNBC:

Technology start-up Polaroid Swing launched a policy on Tuesday allowing its employees to take paid time off work for political engagements such as protests or running for political office, co-founder Tommy Stadlen told CNBC.

Stadlen is British and started the company in San Francisco. He said that over half of the 12-strong team are immigrants and his decision to introduce the policy was driven in part by the increasingly anti-immigration rhetoric coming from countries such as the U.S. and U.K.

We forgot to mention, but certainly should have, that there are hundreds of actors in this two and a half minute video and only about three of them are so brazen and uncool as to be white. Not least of which is the star, Kendall Jenner. Which certainly is a slap in the face to the expectations of the Democratic voters who star in the thing and for whom it was made. After all, haven’t they been promised a world in which white people have been eliminated?

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Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America discuss the Trump administration’s new executive order temporarily banning travel from six nations with major terrorism problems.  They also react to North Korea announcing its latest missile tests were designed to strike U.S. bases in Japan.  And they slam teachers in Alexandria, Virginia, for forcing the cancellation of school because 300 of them plan to attend the anti-Trump women’s march.

In the Time of Trump, the Democrats’ Crucible: RFK or Bill Ayers?

 

In our two-party dominated system, politics shift; sometimes subtly, sometimes seismically. What either side believes today, the other side may espouse tomorrow. The Republican Party once supported tariffs and isolationism; the Democrats once supported free trade and internationalism. Driven by changing attitudes amongst the electorate that were expressed through the God-given, constitutionally recognized rights to freely speak, assemble, and petition government for the redress of grievances, over time the parties either discarded or adopted these and other issues in their respective pursuits of a governing coalition.

What never shifted was both parties’ shared America’s political paradigm, namely that ours is an exceptional nation where constructive change was best – and solely – advanced through peaceable means.

This hard-earned lesson, ingrained during the fiery crucible of civil war, nonetheless has been tested at times in the 20th Century: turn-of-the-century Anarchism; the 1930s fascist and communist movements, which claimed to be politically transcendent to a failed old order that wrought the Great Depression; and the 1960s left- and right-wing radicalism. All these fevered, fringe movements refused — indeed, in many instances espoused — violence, including assassinations, bombings, rioting, burning, and looting. These right and left radical movements also shared a contempt for America’s free republic, which was decried as antiquated and/or oppressive and imperialist.

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Welcome to the Harvard Lunch Club Political Podcast for January 24, 2017, it’s the Carnage? What Carnage? edition of the podcast. We are brought to you this week by Patriot Mobile. Do you want a portion of every dollar you pay for mobile phone service to go to left wing causes? That may be happening, but there is an answer: Patriot Mobile.

This week we will discuss the dystopian, gloomy perspective that President Trump (wow! That felt good!) has of the current American experience as exemplified in his inauguration speech. Why does the media insist on hammering Trump for pointing out the “carnage” in the streets? As Heather Mac Donald points out in a recent National Review piece, if 16 unarmed Blacks killed by police in 2016 is a horror story, why isn’t 6000 Blacks murdered (in 2015) by fellow citizens not appropriately described as carnage?

Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America get a kick out of Trump protesters arguing about who is more oppressed.  They also rip New Jersey Sen. Cory Booker for testifying against the nomination of Sen. Jeff Sessions to be attorney general.  And they sigh as the insane people from Code Pink repeatedly disrupt the Sessions confirmation hearings.

I Don’t Have the Time to Protest

 

Does that title sound bad? I’ve always thought about that. How did people make it work, even back in the 1960s? How did they keep food on the table and clothes on their backs and protest?

I see the protesters clashing with police on TV or social media (Twitter typically) and I still feel that protesting peacefully now is lost on this generation. Many times protesters (not all) will be overly aggressive and violent towards the police and they often damage property. (Of course, this kind of protest is not new either.)

Member Post

 

Whatever happened to peaceful protest?  Did it die with the likes of Dr. Martin Luther King? It saddens me that each time Donald Trump has a rally somewhere, many aggressive people show up looking for a fight.  That took place again in San Jose.  People use, as an excuse, their dislike for him as a […]

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Maverick Philosopher is one of the great blogs. He covers everything from deep philosophical questions, to politics, to rock n roll. In this article he invites us to combat the culture of political correctness with some decidedly incorrect activities. It’s the highest form of protest: Bill de Blasio Goes After Chick-Fil-A There was a dust-up […]

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A New College President’s First Address

 

shutterstock_261537968In a previous message, An Open Letter to Concerned Student 1950, I offered some comments about student protesters at Missouri’s flagship university, suggesting that in some academic hideaway, there might be a leader who wouldn’t put up with their rebellious ways. I signed the message, “A Concerned American, from a few generations in the past.”

However, let us suppose that such a person did magically show up, say, as a newly appointed interim-president charged with the task of dealing with contumacious crowds bent on taking over the university. As a public service, I offer the following comments for this individual’s first address to fellow administrators, faculty, and students:

Good morning, ladies and gentlemen.

Member Post

 

Although students are demanding that campuses become a “safe space” where they’ll never hear things they don’t like, we’re guessing if they get their way they’ll soon find it to be a very confining and uncomfortable space. Case in point: at one “safe space” rally in California, an Asian student said she’d been racially harassed […]

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Following racial protests which forced the resignation of Missouri University President Tim Wolfe and Chancellor R. Bowen Loftin, both of whom were just dripping with evil, irredeemable white privilege, the University Police are taking bold steps to restore order, get the black members of the football team to suit up again (really), and save the […]

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I’m a big believer in luck. Not just the “You make your own luck” stuff, but simple, dumb, unearned and unforeseen good fortune. I figured out that luck was real when I got my first disc jockey gig at 17. I had absolutely no business landing the job. My voice still crackled a bit (it […]

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Two Acts of Free Speech

 

A bit over a week ago, some pupils at Valdosta State University engaged in a protest centered on walking and stomping on the US flag — a flag Americans have been maimed and have died defending, a flag symbolizing the very freedom of speech that allows protesters to desecrate the flag as part of their protest.

Yes, desecrating our flag is a despicable act, but that’s what gives power to a protest of this sort. The act is an expression of political speech, and it is legitimately protected as such.