Tag: prosecutors

In this week’s special episode, former prosecutors Thomas Hogan and Jim Quinn join Rafael A. Mangual to discuss new Manhattan district attorney Alvin Bragg and the options available to preserve public order when prosecutors won’t prosecute.

Find the transcript of this conversation and more at City Journal.

Join Jim and Greg as they welcome a Quinnipiac poll showing Republicans actually leading Democrats on the 2022 generic ballot. They also stunned in disbelief as Chicago prosecutor Kim Foxx refuses to press any charges in a fatal gang shootout because the deadly violence involved “mutual combatants” who willingly took part. And they shake their heads as there is considerable disagreement among government officials over whether booster shots are a needed for most people who have been vaccinated.

Justice for Warriors

 

The military used to be one of the most highly respected organizations of our federal government. Over time, however, it has suffered from the criticism of a Progressive society. Barack Obama made some of the most drastic changes to the military and in so doing exacerbated the negative perceptions of society toward the military:

A curious thing happened in the second half of the Obama era: The commander-in-chief began viewing the military less as an entity designed to destroy enemies but a tool with which to achieve progressive goals. Warriors were turned into social-justice warriors. Men and women with risible-to-nonexistent military records were made heads of the services. Navy Secretary Ray Mabus (who had logged all of two years’ service as a junior officer) named ships after Cesar Chavez and Harvey Milk.

Rafael Mangual joins Seth Barron to discuss the disturbing leftward trend among urban prosecutors in major cities and the consequences of undoing the crime-fighting revolution of the 1990s.

In recent years, cities like Philadelphia and Chicago have elected district attorneys dedicated to the principles of social-justice and the goal of “dismantling mass incarceration.” The shift away from proactive law enforcement has opened a rift between police and local prosecutors and points to more trouble ahead for many cities.