Tag: propaganda

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I’m taking the evening off writing because of some work I have to do. But don’t worry–my daughter is guest posting for me tonight. She says that this is partly in response to John Greene’s essay: “Why the Word Millennial Makes Me Cringe.”  I am a millennial, born in late 1999. And I agree with many, John […]

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Since reading Claire Berlinski’s post on Putin’s propaganda earlier this month, I’ve sort of kept my eyes open for instances of it. The following are screenshots (literally taking pictures of the screen because I don’t know how to take a screenshot on my phone) of Suggested/Sponsored posts that have appeared in my Facebook news feed […]

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Our government is now officially in the propaganda business.  Of course we saw this already with the Pajama Boy idiocy with the roll out of Obamacare, but if you have any reason to peruse any other government website you will find this same egregious self promotion there too. Case in point for today:  The Department […]

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American Movie

 

Last week I attended a showing of Dinesh D’Souza’s America: Imagine the World Without Her.  And I witnessed a movie resplendent with inspiring, patriotic imagery and a complete dramatic story arc full of tension and heartbreak and evolution and ultimately resolution and glorification of what it is to be an American.  Unfortunately, these were two different movies.

Born_On_The_4th_Of_JulyThe latter experience was Oliver Stone’s Born on the Fourth of July.  It was released 25 years ago and I’m an admirer of Stone’s work, but I had not seen it before.  A reluctance to subject myself to a full color, wide screen exploration of the horrors of war, combined with Stone and Kovic’s overt political agenda kept me away.  Stone’s previous movie “Platoon” is one of my favorites of the 80’s and it is a variation of the same recipe.  But Platoon‘s arguments were safely buried in the past, firmly fixed on an old war for which the political wisdom of fighting it did not affect the contemporary context (by the way, Platoon was released in 1986, a mere 11 years after the fall of Saigon, but at the time, to a teenager, it felt like near ancient history).  Of course, Born on the Fourth of July is about the same old war.  But its agenda was forward-looking, the lessons learned from Vietnam were intended to be visited upon political decisions made in the current day.  That was made clear by Kovic’s continuing political activism in the name of “peace” but in exclusive service of the Democrat party and whoever on the world scene happened to be opposing the United States.  So, I skipped it, until now.

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Robert Coalson at The Atlantic accepted this challenge on March 31 (the 200th anniversary of the Russian army’s entry into Paris), and lived to to tell about it. Here’s what he learned: Europe is in flames. Russia is stable and efficient, but surrounded by envious enemies. Fascists are everywhere. Poland engineered Napoleon’s attack on Russia […]

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