Tag: Progressivism

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Is National Socialism America’s “Progressive” Future?

 

If a doppelgänger of Joseph Goebbels, the “poison dwarf” propaganda minister of the Third Reich, were somehow to leap into the 21st century and embark on a Tocqueville-like tour of his country’s former enemy, probably he would be stunned by developments thought to have perished with the Nazis’ defeat in 1945. Of course, technological progress would dazzle any time traveler from that era — though Goebbels might huff that German science predicated many advances — but professional interests likely would dominate his observations.

Some things would make him laugh: micro-aggressions, safe spaces, counseling for sensitive egos — are you kidding me? Others would evoke comparisons to practices more familiar to him, such as America’s huge “fake news” industry — i.e., media lies — and Planned Parenthood’s annual slaughter of innocents. So much to see, so much to evaluate, so much to compare!

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Interviewing Instapundit on the ‘Judiciary’s Class War’

 

Glenn Harlan Reynolds, aka Instapundit, routinely puts forth novel and compelling arguments.

I wanted to call your attention to his latest, as described in a provocative new Encounter Books broadside titled The Judiciary’s Class War, regarding what I would describe as the Supreme Court’s cultural and too frequently ideological progressivism.

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Member Post

 

Totalitarianism demands, in fact, the continuous alteration of the past, and in the long run probably demands a disbelief in the very existence of objective truth. – George Orwell This is the close of a longer quote, which in its entirety reads: Read More View Post

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Heresy of Evangelical Christians?

 

Most of my adult life I’ve been keenly aware of how the evangelical community has defended the Jews and Israel; I realize that this feeling is shared by many other Christian communities, but since the evangelical churches are under attack by their Progressive Christian brethren, I’m calling attention to them.

Signatories of the Boston Declaration covered in sackcloth and ashes. (Courtesy of Susan Thistlethwaite)

Recently I learned about one of the most blatant modern attacks on Christians by westerners that I’ve heard of, and I felt compelled to speak out.

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Children: The Latest Victims of Transgenderism

 

I’ve written previously about the adult transgender population. I planned not to tackle the topic again, since I find it absurd and disturbing. Recently however, I realized that we have a disaster brewing, as children are being recruited as the next population to fulfill the Progressive agenda at a terrible cost.

The overall goal for all of these groups is supposedly to identify children who are confused about their sexuality; a term that is used is gender dysphoria. It’s important to point out this type of thinking in children is not unusual:

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Over the last decade or so, liberal has been replaced by progressive as a descriptor of the modern American Left. I had the opportunity to witness the some of the low-level discussion and planning of this rebranding in 2010. Jane Harman, Blue Dog Democrat and wife of the co-founder of audio company Harman Kardon, had […]

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Victor Davis Hanson explores the factors that led to widespread defeats for Democrats in 2016 — and warns of trends within the party that may prevent it from commanding electoral majorities anytime soon.

Victor Davis Hanson examines the early initiatives coming out of the Trump Administration and reflects on whether the new president’s momentum is sustainable over the long run.

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. DeVos Nomination Is the Most Contested Because It’s About the Future

 

The Betsy DeVos nomination proved to be the most contentious; the hill Democrats have chosen to die on. Why? Because it’s about the future:

  • The future of the teachers’ unions, who had much of their power stripped from them in Wisconsin with the passage of Act 10, and who barely survived losing power in California due to 4-4 Supreme Court tie in Friedrichs v. California Teachers Association et. al.
  • The future of the Department of Education in whether it will be greatly scaled back or allowed to remain largely intact and in the future return to its practice of “Dear Colleague” letters to universities, school districts, etc. dictating the abandonment of due process for the accused and imposing radical social policy with the threat of federal lawsuits.
  • The future of whether states, municipalities, and most importantly parents will have the freedom to determine the opportunities available to children — charter schools, school choice, home schooling, in addition to public schools — or fewer choices due to further and further regulations dictated by federal bureaucrats in Washington beholden to the interests of teachers’ unions.
  • The future of what is taught to children — does the federal government know better than you what your children should learn in school? A federally determined curriculum reaches more students if more students are forced to remain in the public schools. Progressive ideology must be taught to the next generation. A DeVos-run Department of Education will hopefully abandon central planning style Common Core curricula and return that power to the states.

Betsy DeVos has the opportunity to do so much good and bring to an end so much Education departmental overreach and abuse of power. The Democrats were desperate to prevent this from happening. It’s all about the future.

Victor Davis Hanson provides cultural and historical context for Donald Trump’s presidential victory and speculates on what the early days of the new administration may yield.

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The New York Times is generally credited with having introduced the genre of highlighting the suffering of government-favored groups, perfectly satirized by Mort Sahl when he posited the headline World Ends, Women and Minorities Hardest Hit. (Page 2: Woman Completely Satisfied). While the Times may have created the genre, the Washington Post perfected it with its […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Member Post

 

Mr. James W. Caesar is one of the very successful political scientists who owe their education to Leo Strauss & who have educated generations of political scientists who need not be ashamed of their education, which is a rather rare thing. Well, Mr. Caesar is another, older kind of conservative–a learned man who contributes to his […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Trump: Progressive or Anti-Progressive?

 

Trump-Profile“Is ‘right-wing progressivism’ too much of an oxymoron?” one member recently asked. “Because that’s kind of how I see the Trump movement.” In response, another member said “In this case it is. There are quite a fair number of Trump supporters who are in that situation reluctantly, who are in no way progressives. Give credit to these people, they honestly see Hillary as worse, and putting them down for taking that view won’t persuade them otherwise.” Reluctant supporters strike me as quite different, though, from enthusiastic supporters. It’s not hard to argue that Trump is a “right wing” progressive. But Trump also strikes so many people as anti-progressive. Why is this?

“Progress” as such, beyond the bare minimum necessary to sustain a Christian worldview (the Christian story inevitably gives history some direction), is not something I really believe in. Sure, I call technological improvements “advancements” or “progress,” because that’s what everybody calls them. But the vision of history progressing toward some secular goal is not one I believe in. The idea that it’s the proper function of the State to promote this “progress” is one I believe in even less.

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It’s surpassingly easy to get depressed about the state of our institutions of higher education. But we should also celebrate those moments that reveal genuine thinking and good sense! Here is a very thoughtful and well-written article recently published in the Skidmore News. The author is one of our best senior majors in the government department. […]

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Promoted from the Ricochet Member Feed by Editors Created with Sketch. A Jewish Atheist for a More Christian America

 

shutterstock_222016312A few years ago I got sucked into a LinkedIn college alumni chat group where political discussions were going on. For the most part, the participants were smart, articulate adults, not college students, all of whom, moreover, had endured the famously rigorous classical core curriculum of our alma mater. Nonetheless, in due course, every Media Matters talking point and lunatic piece of campus-Marxist SJW nonsense was trotted out one by one and presented as revealed truth requiring no further proof. These debates — which were heated but civil by Internet standards — went on for close to two years before they finally succumbed to a combination of acrimony and the meddling and censorship of the university’s busybody apparatchiks who ran the thing. Apparently, people don’t like to have their core beliefs about the world subjected to critical scrutiny and found wanting. No minds were changed. It was, on the whole, a depressing experience.

Anyone who has ever engaged in political debate must at some point have come to the conclusion that such arguments are pointless. In the long history of political debate, from the Athenian assembly to the lamentable farce that is the so-called World’s Greatest Deliberative Body, no fully-formed adult human has ever walked away from the experience a convert to the opposing position. When conversions do happen, as with Irving Kristol or David Mamet, they are the result not of rational inquiry, but of protracted mugging by reality. You can’t reason a man out of something he wasn’t reasoned into, and politics, like religion, falls into the category of things whose core precepts are not susceptible to rational interrogation.

Promoted from the Ricochet Member Feed by Editors Created with Sketch. Why Conservatism Lost

 

It’s no secret that I’m gleeful about the crack-up in Conservatism. I’ve made that clear in audio-meetups and in the live chats. If I may be so bold, I would like to propose a simpler reason for the demise of Conservatism than many of the reasons currently floated by political analysts. It doesn’t involve climate change or demographics, and it is only somewhat related to economic growth. It is not beyond the control of Conservatives themselves. Conservatives caused their own demise for one reason, and that reason comes down to Conservatism’s lack of quantitative explanations for middle class problems.

Before I go deeper into this explanation, let me just add that Progressivism does not have this problem. Indeed, Progressive control of academia has allowed Progressives to analyze many discoveries made in economics, political science, mathematics, statistics, etc. and craft explanations for many of these phenomena through the development of models. Some of these models offer great insight, while others do not. Still, Conservatives have ceded academia to Progressives, and Progressives have been the ones to make the discoveries and apply an understanding of these discoveries to government policy. This is done directly, through government research institutions (such as the Federal Reserve), or indirectly through advice given by think-tanks and academics to Liberal politicians, who then seek to turn this advice into policy.

Promoted from the Ricochet Member Feed by Editors Created with Sketch. Should a Policy’s Racist History Matter?

 

shutterstock_54864934It’s funny. Left-wing opponents of school choice frequently carp about the fact that some segregationists thought school vouchers would be a swell way to avoid sending their kids to school with blacks, as though that’s a reason to oppose them today, even though research shows that school vouchers foster racial integration and their primary beneficiaries tend to be black and brown kids.

If so, why isn’t the extremely racist history of the minimum wage also relevant?

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Note that this is merely a current list of evil ideas. It changes by the week, if not the day. 1. Capitalism is inherently and demonstrably superior to socialism (including “democratic socialism”). Read More View Post

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