Tag: Principles

Is Loyalty a Meaningless Word?

 

Does anyone care about loyalty anymore? Loyalty to principles, country, people and institutions seems to be disappearing, or its meaning has been manipulated to meet a multitude of agendas. And along with all the other cultural disruptions, the state of loyalty is endangered.

We used to believe that loyalty to principles was a significant commitment. It’s not that we couldn’t examine, evaluate or discuss all principles, but we pursued activities to better understand them, to learn how our principles interfaced with the principles of others, or even how we might act to uphold them. We were both proud of and humbled by the principles we held, and looked for opportunities to realize them in our lives. And yet many have embraced a loyalty of convenience—they’ll put their chips where they can get the most power and leverage. There is moral relativism as well, where everyone gets to decide for him or herself what matters and what is sacred.

Fighting the Good Fight

 

Like most of you, I move from rage at the outcome of this election, to enormous sadness to find our country where it has arrived. These major shifts of emotions are not only debilitating to my sanity (what there is left of it), but unhelpful to the country. I am so impressed with the strategies for investigating the fraud of the election processes that many people have developed, and the ways we can fight back against the election injustices. But we can’t allow ourselves to be buried in investigations and not find a way beyond the results of this election. We must deal with the hard truth. These are my next steps.

  1. Acknowledge my outrage at the corruption, fraud and lack of allegiance to the success of this country. I have never been so invested in an election, nor have I ever feared for our future as much as I do now. At the same time, I refuse to let myself be buried under the ugliness and duplicity that has occurred. I must find a way to balance the truth with new opportunities for moving forward. This effort will be so very difficult, but I know this is the only way I can find my way out of this morass.
  2. Encourage and support every investigation of the processes and outcomes of this election. No stone should be left unturned. We should look at every state we can, study data and procedures, including those that worked well (such as several in Florida) and those that were disasters. We must find a way to shine a light on all the deplorable actions that those in charge took, whether they turned their heads away from the corruption or encouraged it. People should be solicited to report every illegal action that they witnessed, providing evidence whenever possible. And findings should be placed in the hands of the courts.
  3. Identify every weakness in every system in every state. Prioritize them in the order of most exploitative and least impactful. Since every violation might not be able to be addressed, prioritizing will be important.
  4. Develop a plan to change the election process that addresses the findings of the investigation; identify which changes would be permissible under the Constitution for the Federal government to institute, and which changes must be left with the states. Build-in processes that will ensure the integrity of the system and minimize fraud. Determine the person or governmental body that is most likely to take the investigation seriously, in terms of publicizing the results and making changes to the system. Find new and creative ways to make sure that people know the results.
  5. Acknowledge that even if there is ample evidence that the election results were significantly fraudulent, the systems in place may very well prevent changes to be made. We can fight to the end for the truth to win out, for integrity to reign, but in the current environment, we may ultimately lose.

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Member Post

 

I’m an amateur at everything I do. But I do a lot of thinking and trying to figure out why things happen the way they do and why people think and say the things they do. So, I guess I’m an amateur philosopher, in a way. We keep having these discussions on Ricochet around the […]

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Member Post

 

I was in the middle of getting my Ph.D. in Massachusetts in 2010, when Scott Brown won his Senate race as part of the unsuccessful push against Obamacare’s passage. For most of my time in MA, I didn’t pay a lot of attention to local politics because, really, what did it matter? I voted, nearly […]

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Giving the Benefit of the Doubt and Voting One’s Conscience

 

I did not vote for Donald Trump in the primaries. Nor did I vote for my preferred choice in the primaries. By the time the primaries reached Michigan, my preferred choice had dropped out. So had my second choice. So had my third. By the time the primaries came to my state, I had to choose who the best remaining viable candidate was. That was Ted Cruz. Unfortunately, he did not win the nomination.

Now, the primaries were a rough fight and many of the candidates came out bruised up, including Cruz. Trump had insulted his wife and made accusations against his father. Slights of that kind can take time to heal. At the convention, Senator Cruz said, “Vote your conscience.” I agreed with that and intended to do so.