Tag: President

Let Chaos Reign!

 

The_Melee,_Eglinton_TournamentWhy have “controlled” debates at all? Curt Anderson, in today’s WSJ, suggests that we just let the candidates debate each other whenever and wherever they like.

The Republican Party should be looking forward instead of backward—and seeking every opportunity to feature its roster of excellent candidates, rather than trying to find ways to constrict the field. The voters will do that, as is their prerogative. The simple truth is that competitive primaries usually make a party stronger, not weaker.

He continues:

Member Post

 

Feel free to pick out your favorite highlights in the comments. Its common these days to dismiss modern politicians as practicing “soundbite” and “talking point” politics. When someone tries to speak more extemporaneously, they are dismissed by the New York Times as “rambling”. So, take a listen to the “rambling man”. And, then, note how […]

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I’ve a question for Americans who remember the time after 9/11 when it had become clear America was going to wage war in the Middle East: Did Mr. Bush, Jr. ever do something that had you fearful that bad things would come to America as a consequence? I’ve a question, too, for people old enough to […]

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Over on my Facebook timeline, I just posted this little missive about profligate waste and global warming hypocrisy. If you need any better example as why people hate inside the beltway politics, here’s one good reason why to be infuriated. The President and First Lady took separate planes to California yesterday to make their TV appearances, […]

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A Quick Reaction to the NLRB Ruling

 

Supreme_Court_US_2010I think the decision today in NLRB v. Noel Canning is correct. It brushes back Obama’s unprecedented stretching of executive authority to appoint lower officials without the Senate, but it preserve the more traditional power for the next President. The whole affair puts on display President Obama’s abuse of presidential power for small-ball politics. Previous presidents have claimed expansive powers in the face of great emergencies, whether it be the Civil War, the Great Depression and the rise of fascism, the Cold War, or the 9-11 attacks. Obama risked the executive power built by generations of presidents just to win a few pro-union decisions on the NLRB.

It is clear that Justice Scalia has the better reading of the original Constitution. He and the conservative justices Thomas, Alito, and Chief Justice Roberts, would have held that the President cannot make appointments except for vacancies that arise between the first session of Congress and the second session of Congress, which generally matches the first and second years between House elections. That is the better reading of the constitutional text. If Scalia had been able to attract the swing vote of Justice Kennedy, he would have succeeded — ironically, given his long support for a robust executive — in permanently restricting presidential power.

Instead, the majority — Justice Breyer writing — upheld a long historical practice of Presidents filling vacancies, even those that occur when the Senate is in session. The majority found that Senates have long allowed Presidents to fill vacancies during recesses that are as short as 10 days. But the Court rejected Obama’s unprecedented claim that he could use this power even when the Senate was currently meeting. Obama made the dangerous argument that he could decide when the Senate was really conducting business or not — a claim foreclosed by the Constitution, which gives to Congress the sole power over its own proceedings. This was a bridge too far for every member of the Court, liberal or conservative.