Tag: Populism

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Loving Pain as Given: A Review of Heroes, a Dark Twist on the Grateful Acre

 

For B, and other youth whose grateful acres host, if not prairies, at least patchy meadows. And for Gary McVey.

It’s been a year since Will Arbery’s play, Heroes of the Fourth Turning, took the conservative Catholic blogosphere – or rather, that part able to see the play or a private script – by storm. Now the script is available to the public. I ordered my copy here. If you can afford to, read it. Theaters remain closed, but the theater of imagination richly rewards reading a play. Reading reveals motifs easy to miss when a play just happens to you in performance and you can’t revisit it. This review addresses unspoken pressures, like the prosperity gospel (which may not influence orthodox Christians’ theology, but can influence their social expectations), behind what conservatives speculate is Heroes’ demonic finale, the “We” who may, or may not be, Legion.

Eric Kaufmann joined host Ben Domenech to discuss his work within fields of research related to populism across the world and specifically in the United States. Kaufmann is a professor of politics at Birkbeck College at the University of London and is the author of “Whiteshift: Populism, Immigration, and the Future of White Majorities.”

Kaufmann argues that the new antiracism movement worldwide, but which is specifically dominant in American culture, is a form of secular religion. He refers to the modern American sentiment as the “third great awokening,” following the former waves in the late 60s and the 90s. It stems from the idea that tradition, both religious and national, ought to be eliminated to make room for the new religion of antiracism. It resembles many historical international movements, Kaufmann said.

Shadi Hamid joined host Ben Domenech to discuss what the past few months have revealed about our country and how they have shaped public opinion about our country’s leadership. Hamid is a senior fellow at the Brookings Institute, a contributing writer at The Atlantic, and author of several books, including his most recent, “Islamic Exceptionalism.”

Hamid argued that the reaction by so-called experts concerning quarantine and the recent protests following the death of George Floyd have revealed how untrustworthy they are. Their constantly changing opinion during quarantine, Hamid said, has caused him to lose faith in those in powerful positions. He added the experts have further undermined their position by putting politics above themselves in regards to the protests.

Founding Editor in Chief of the Washington Free Beacon and self-described “Reagan enthusiast” Matthew Continetti discusses Reagan’s relationship with populism, #40’s take on democracy promotion, and the state of Reaganism today.

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Biden, Trump, and the New Normal

 

Politicians love fighting the last battle. Every four years, we see a slew of candidates relitigating the last presidential race, often using the same strategy that lost the previous time.

This trend is dominant in 2019 with the rise of Biden’s candidacy and the continuing rear-guard battle by anti-Trump Republicans. Joe’s main message is a return to the supposed normalcy of 2008-2016. “Know what I was most proud of?” Joe said Wednesday, “For eight years, there wasn’t one single hint of a scandal or a lie.”

Hey, there’s a lie right there. Has it never occurred to him that the Obama years are what created Trump?

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At the height of the American Revolution, a violent upsurge of populism set Pennsylvanians against each other. On October 4th, 1779, militia and agitators paraded down the streets of Philadelphia with four prominent conservatives in their custody. Their intent was force the men onto a ship bound for the British stronghold of New York – […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. The Consent of the Governed

 

Once again I’m looking at the Declaration. In the PowerPoint version of the Declaration, this would be one of the bullet points on the “We hold these truths to be self-evident” slide:

That to secure these rights Governments are instituted among Men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed,

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“A political philosophy supporting the rights and power of the people in their struggle against the privileged elite.” This is what the online dictionary says when the word “populism” is looked up. Pretty nebulous, right? Shouldn’t a political philosophy have some tools in its quiver as to how to actually handle the issues that inevitably […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Don’t Ask Government for Love, Tucker

 

Tucker Carlson is completely right about one thing – the decline of marriage is a great challenge of our times. I’ve written a whole book about it. So, you’d think I would rejoice that Carlson’s rant-heard-round-the-right focused on it. Sorry, no. I’ve rarely seen such a cynical and misleading use of television.

Everything that is going wrong with this country, Carlson instructed his viewers, is the consequence of “uncaring” politicians. They don’t care about your 19-year-old son who’s high on pot. Why? “It’s not an accident.” It’s because “our leaders understood that they could get rich from marijuana.” Never mind that 62 percent of voters say they want to decriminalize marijuana.

“Our ruling class,” Carlson intones, doesn’t care that firms like Bain Capital strip mine companies and leave retirees without benefits because “it’s the way they run the country.” To the barricades, comrades!

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Populism, Economic Nostalgia, and ‘Left Behind’ America

 

Economic nostalgia is a notable attribute of America’s populists on the left and right. If not for the mistakes of elite policymakers, the economic golden age of postwar America might never have ended. But it’s not just economic nostalgia that unites populists across the political spectrum. It is also the idea that reality puts no constraints on policymakers’ actions, or at least the effectiveness of those actions. Take the issue of what to do about America’s “left behind” regions. It’s the subject two outstanding pieces, one in The New York Times by Eduardo Porter, the other in The Wall Street Journal by Christopher Mims. Both are definitely worth a read.

In “The Hard Truths of Trying to ‘Save’ the Rural Economy,” Porter notes the “inescapable reality of agglomeration.” Innovative companies, the sort that generate high-paying jobs, want to locate near other innovative companies so they can tap deep pools of high-skilled worker talent. And thus you have Amazon building new campuses in New York City and Washington DC, rather than Columbus, OH. Sure, policy wonks have lots of ideas to help distressed communities take part in the evolving American economy — tech education initiatives, broadband investment — but there are no guarantees. As Brookings scholar William Galston is quoted, “I don’t know if these ideas are going to work. But it is worth making the effort.”

In “Where You Should Move to Make the Most Money: America’s Superstar Cities,” Mims also cites the technology-driven agglomeration phenomenon as a prime driver of geographic inequality and rise of “superstar” cities: “As firms cluster around talent, and talent is in turn drawn to those firms, the result is a self-reinforcing trend toward ever-richer, ever-costlier metro areas that are economically dominant over the rest of the country.”

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https://www.nytimes.com/2018/11/22/world/europe/hillary-clinton-migration-populism-europe.html …or, she returns to her true self after flirting with being more leftist during the 2016 campaign….or, she was and still is truly liberal but is signalling to democrats to tread carefully until the populist wave loses some steam (thanks for that one to Mark Steyn on today’s Rush show). Preview Open

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I spent part of last week watching and reading accounts of the marches in Charlottesville. The media scrum was predictably the same at this year’s event as it was last year. There were roughly a couple dozen white nationalist marchers on display. Far lower than last year. Whereas there was a dramatic uptick was the […]

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In case you missed Bill Kristol’s interview with Christopher Caldwell on Populism in Europe and the Future of the European Union, it was sobering. In a calm tone, his thoughtful and measured responses to Kristol’s questions seemed to need deliverance via a bullhorn. Seismic shifts in, well……everything – is anyone paying attention? http://ricochet.com/527807/conversations-with-bill-kristol-christopher-caldwell-on-populism-in-europe-and-the-future-of-the-european-union/ Caldwell states […]

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This week on Banter, Dr. William Galston joins the show to discuss his new book Anti-Pluralism: The Populist Threat to Liberal Democracy. Dr. Galston serves as the Ezra K. Zilkha Chair in the Governance Studies Program at the Brookings Institution. He is a former policy adviser to President Bill Clinton. The book describes populist movements in the United States and Europe and the economic, cultural, and societal factors that led us to this moment. Dr. Galston concludes the book with several policy recommendations that might stem the populist tide and strengthen liberal democracy.

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This week on Banter, Dr. Yascha Mounk joined the show to discuss his new book, “The People vs. Democracy: Why Our Freedom Is in Danger and How to Save It.” In his book, Mounk explains the rise of populism and its threats to liberal democracy, but also provides some practical solutions to turning that tide. Dr. Mounk is a lecturer on government at Harvard University, a senior fellow in the Political Reform program at New America, and executive director at the Tony Blair Institute for Global Change. His research focuses on political theory and comparative politics. He participated in a book event at AEI with AEI’s Jonah Goldberg, Norm Ornstein, and Stan Veuger. You can watch the full event video at the link below.

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Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America are pleasantly stunned to hear Saudi Arabia’s crown prince publicly state that Israel has a right to live in peace on its own land and wonder if things are truly changing in the Middle East or whether this is a temporary thaw in order to confront Iran. In the wake of the very public feud between Fox News host Laura Ingraham and gun control activist David Hogg, they also discuss how the rise of populism leads to political debates becoming a referendum on the people in the debate rather than the ideas involved in the debate. And they wonder why President Trump is spending so much time blasting Amazon and the rate it pays to mail packages, suspecting it might have something to do with another business venture headed by Jeff Bezos.

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Our Conversation with Victor Davis Hanson

 

Professor Victor Davis Hanson discussed his prescient contribution to Vox Populi: The Perils and Promises of Populism with our own Ben Weingarten. You can listen to their interview right here on Ricochet. What follows is a full transcript of their discussion, slightly modified for clarity.

Ben Weingarten: The term “populism” has been thrown around repeatedly throughout history and it’s often used pejoratively to put down one’s political opponents. How do you define it?

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. In Defense of “Half-Baked Nationalism”

 

To say that I’m not a big fan of Sen. John McCain (R-NYTimes Editorial Board) would be an under-statement.

I’m a huge fan of his military service, but as a senator he has only two speeds: Irrelevant and Obnoxious. When he’s not voting like a pretty traditional Republican and going along with the party, he’s out declaring how much better he is than the party he regularly carries water for.

You think Steve Bannon likes beating the crap out of the GOP? He’s a piker compared to John McCain who, since 2000, has made a fetish of it. During the 2008 presidential primaries, I created the website “MyDearJohnLetter.com” where conservatives could post their break-up messages with the Republican candidate who clearly had such a low opinion of GOP voters.

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There’s a civil war going on in the Illinois Republican Party which can only accrue to the benefit of the Democrats. From my blog: Jonah Goldberg has written an article in National Review talking about the recent primary election for Senator in Alabama. I was struck by how much the points he made apply to […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. The Great Sort and the Rise of Populism

 

Over the course of a generation, American politics has increasingly been shaped by a series of forces which are only now beginning to be understood. This phenomenon has created effects as divergent and seemingly disconnected from each other as the inflation of real estate prices in California’s Silicon Valley to the election of Donald Trump and the rise of populism. Trying to understand the underlying forces which animate these disparate occurrences requires traveling back in time to track both their origins and how they’ve progressed over time.

Let’s start in 1976 with Jimmy Carter winning the Presidential election with 50.1% of the popular vote. He does so with just 26.8% of counties voting for him with a margin in excess of 20%. After Carter’s inauguration in 1977, Steve Wozniak and Steve Jobs found the Apple Computer Corporation in April. Later that year, Paul Allen and Bill Gates found Microsoft. The median price of a home in the US is $33,000. The median price of a home in Cupertino, CA — where Apple will ultimately place its headquarters — is slightly higher, as California Real Estate tends to be.

I’ve picked this moment in time as a baseline. There was it seems, a much greater sense of interconnectedness between people throughout the country at the local level. The numbers bear this out. The still relatively small number of people who attended college mainly returned home and went to work, married a high school acquaintance (the even smaller number of women who attended college then practically guaranteed this) and lived their lives. People were far more likely to live next to a person of differing ideological persuasion or even a different income stratum.