Tag: political violence

Important Details to Note in Rand and Kelley Paul Interviews

 

After watching these two brief interviews with Senator Rand Paul (see clips below), and also with his wife Kelley in the second interview, I can only hope that the FBI and local law enforcement have assigned additional 24/7 security to him and his family. It reminds me of the police squad car and officers that were stationed at Governor Walker’s house in Wauwatosa, Wisconsin 24 hours a day/7 days a week following all the death threats against him and his family after the passage of Act 10 (and the weeks-long violent occupation of the Wisconsin state capitol building). Walker has since moved out of Wauwatosa (it’s turning blue, unfortunately, for various reasons), but I remember being reassured (the house is on a main thoroughfare near my parents’ home) that there was a 24/7 police presence whether or not the family was there or at the governor’s mansion in Madison.

Also, after listening to Kelley Paul describe her experience getting the mail, all of the Paul family’s mail and packages should be put through security screening before it is delivered to their home. I would expect, naturally, that the details of his security arrangements are not revealed or discussed publicly, and as the Newsmax article Stad linked to in his post titled “I’m In Love With Rand Paul’s Wife” noted, the Paul family are prepared to defend themselves regardless.

DC Politicians, Big Tech Companies Making Violence More Likely, Not Less

 

By using current events as pretexts for further restricting the ability of people to speak and to communicate, national government politicians and “big tech” companies are increasing the likelihood that people will resort to violence to get their point across.

Politicians and “big tech” claim restricting speech and communication will reduce “conspiracy theories” and the planning of violent actions. But, driving such topics into hidden corners tends to reinforce them and to encourage the people involved to become more extreme and potentially violent.

Police, Andy Ngo, and, Antifa Violence in Portland, OR

 

This past weekend, a quiet, unassuming journalist, Andy Ngo, was roughed-up and badly injured by an Antifa mob in Portland. That was bad enough in itself, but multiple media outlets note that the Portland Police seem to have stood by and let it happen. There have been a number of stories lately about the Portland Police’s passive attitude toward Antifa thugs who bring their brand of “demonstrations” to downtown Portland often. So, the well-known Leftists who run Portland (and Seattle, for that matter), who constantly deplore all sorts of violence, don’t seem to mind this kind of violence.

Well, this particular journalist is fighting back. He has lawyered-up and is planning to sue any and all organizations who contributed to his injuries. More power to him, and may he be successful.

Steve Scalise for the Win, Part 2

 

Many months ago, in May 2018, I reacted to Paul Ryan’s announced retirement, while failing to yield the Speakership, with an impassioned plea for Majority Whip Steve Scalise to be immediately elevated to Speaker, leading the House Republicans to midterm election victory. This week’s news has, regrettably, borne out the wisdom of that advice. If the Republicans hold the House majority, it will be despite the worst efforts of Ryan, and thanks to Congressman Steve Scalise and President Donald Trump.

It should have been obvious, to all House Republicans who wished to retain their majority, and the power and perks of office, that:

Collateral Damage in the Culture War

 

There is an air of incivility in American society today: A simple elevator ride can turn in a lecture on social justicean editor of Think Progress is calling for people to “confront Republicans where they eat, where they sleep and where they work” and simply wearing a hat in a restaurant can touch off a violent attack.

Which got me thinking: What would I do if I were in a restaurant and a politically-based fight broke out as I was eating? Would I get involved if, say, a political argument broke out and it degenerated into fisticuffs? Would my reaction be different if I was by myself, or if it happened when I was with my family? What would I do if the fistfight turned even more violent and lethal force was clearly about to be used? Would I use lethal force in that situation? How far would I be willing to go to defend not only my life but my ideals as well?

Member Post

 

So, yesterday, Democrat Leader Nancy Pelosi officially disavowed and condemned the politically violent ‘Antifa’ group. Not so much out of moral opposition to political violence, but out of the political expedience of  putting distance between the Democrat Party and the violent left wing. It’s very obvious what next year will be like. The worst footage from protest demonstrations will be […]

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Member Post

 

I have been thinking on political violence today; this is the 155th anniversary of the Inaugural Address by which Lincoln tried to prevent the worst kind of political violence, civil war. I will say a few words on prudence in politics as I believe it needs to be learned again, as a concerned foreigner & […]

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