Tag: Policing

On this week’s special episode, communications consultant Yael Bar Tur, police chief Art Acevedo, and Secret Service communications chief Anthony Guglielmi joined Rafael A. Mangual to discuss law enforcement in the time of the Internet.

Find the transcript of this conversation and more at City Journal.

Join Jim and Greg as they congratulate the Virginia legislature and Gov. Glenn Youngkin for passing common sense, bipartisan bills that outlaw formal or informal quotas on arrests and tickets by Virginia police. They also continue to be surprised at the messaging failures of the Biden White House, often with the President himself out of the loop, with transportation masking as the latest example. And despite no obvious constituency or hope of beating Donald Trump or Governor Ron DeSantis, Illinois Rep. Adam Kinzinger floated his name as a potential candidate in the 2024 presidential race.

In this week’s special episode, former prosecutors Thomas Hogan and Jim Quinn join Rafael A. Mangual to discuss new Manhattan district attorney Alvin Bragg and the options available to preserve public order when prosecutors won’t prosecute.

Find the transcript of this conversation and more at City Journal.

Charles Fain Lehman joins Brian Anderson to discuss why police departments are losing officers, flawed arguments for progressive criminal-justice policies, and the enduring relevance of James Q. Wilson’s work on crime.

Find the transcript of this conversation and more at City Journal.

Former NYPD and LAPD commissioner William J. Bratton joins Rafael A. Mangual to discuss his new book, the professionalization of police departments, and the changes that threaten to undo progress in policing. His new book, The Profession, is out now.

Find the transcript of this conversation and more at City Journal.

Charles Fain Lehman joins Brian Anderson to discuss the nationwide crisis of police recruitment and retention, the strong link between the size of a police force and the local crime rate, and policy changes that could stop the downward spiral.

Lehman recently joined the Manhattan Institute as an adjunct fellow, working with its new Policing and Public Safety Initiative. His latest article for City Journal is “Police Departments on the Brink.”

In an interview from 2016, Brian Anderson and the late criminologist and Manhattan Institute fellow George Kelling discuss the history of policing in Milwaukee and more.

Watch the Manhattan Institute’s inaugural George L. Kelling Lecture, delivered by former New York City Police Commissioner William J. Bratton, and learn more about its new Policing and Public Safety Initiative.

Member Post

 

I just got back from a walk on the Chicago lakefront where I saw a sad scene. A young black man had decided to go swimming, slipped on the slippery sidewalk covered in algae, and hit his head. He made a help signal and people on the shore called 911. Then he disappeared under the […]

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Heather Mac Donald joins Seth Barron to discuss YouTube’s restriction of her livestreamed speech on policing, allegations of widespread racial bias in the criminal-justice system, and the ongoing reversal of public-safety gains in New York City.

Member Post

 

One of the more common things I remember seeing on Reason and various Balko article was police killing dogs. Given how often it popped up, I wondered what the deal was. Yeah, some people have very dangerous guard dogs, but some of the cases were yappers. It kept up popping up over and over. For […]

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Dismantle Planned Parenthood

 

“Let us state this unequivocally: originating in slave patrols, policing is inherently rooted in white supremacy and cannot be reformed,” read the latest iteration of this canard, in a recent letter from a group of black students to the administration of Duke University. “Now, we must imagine a world beyond police and prisons, one that seeks to heal and rebuild our communities from generations of systemic violence.”

They’re wrong, of course. Modern American law enforcement can claim descent from British policing as it was organized, two centuries ago, by Sir Robert Peel. Peel (whose Christian name is the inspiration for “Bobbies”) was an indefatigable advocate for professional, humane, community-oriented policing.

Former NYPD and LAPD commissioner William J. Bratton joins Brian Anderson to discuss the troubling state of crime and law enforcement in America, the NYPD’s decision to disband its plainclothes unit, the challenges of police morale and recruitment, and more.

Coleman Hughes’ Black Optimism

 

The title of this post is shamelessly cribbed from the title of an article by Coleman Hughes, of the Manhattan Institute (and contributor to Quillette.com). Among his concerns is “mass incarceration,” and the way black students are alleged to be in a so-called “school to prison pipeline.” The size of America’s prison population, where blacks are over-represented, is of great concern for Hughes. When countering reparations propagandist Ta-Nehisi Coates, Hughes complained to a House of Representatives panel that the talk of slavery reparations ignored the more pressing problem of the high number of blacks in prison. Despite his concerns, Hughes is eager to point out the good news on the issue. In The Case for Black Optimism, published a few months later, he writes:

To put the speed and size of the trend in perspective, between my first day of Kindergarten in 2001 and my first legal drink in 2017, the incarceration rate for black men aged 25–29, 20–24, and 18–19 declined, respectively, by 56 percent, 60 percent, and 72 percent.

Member Post

 

From police officers to protesters, everyone seems to agree that a better trained, more professional police force can improve officers’ decision making and build the community’s faith in law enforcement. But Ohio law requires fewer hours of training to become a police officer than the person who cuts your hair: a minimum of 737 hours […]

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Fun with Drunk Drivers

 

I didn’t want to hijack @dougwatt‘s post with my experiences, so I’ll relate them here.

I was a DWI investigator for three years, a certified “expert,” and the go-to guy for DWI investigations for most of the squads I was assigned. Unlike Doug Watt, I arrested a lot of “DWI virgins,” although “studies have shown” that the average offender drives drunk ten times before they actually get caught.