Tag: police reform

Join Hubwonk host Joe Selvaggi and his conversation with former Boston Police Commissioner Ed Davis who shares his views on the features and controversies of the police reform bill on Beacon Hill.

Guest:
Ed Davis has been in law enforcement for 35 years from his role police officer, detective, and commissioner in his home town of Lowell to serving as the Boston Police Commissioner from December 2006 until October 2013. Commissioner Davis has worked internationally on police issues in Singapore, London, Northern Ireland, Jordan and Israel. Commissioner Davis served on the Police Executive Research Forum’s (PERF) Board of Directors and was a founding member and first President of the Massachusetts Major City Chiefs Association. Mr. Davis is now  President and CEO of The Edward Davis Company, a business strategy and security services firm.

This week on “The Learning Curve,” Cara and Gerard are joined by Jason Riley, a senior fellow at the Manhattan Institute and columnist for The Wall Street Journal. Jason shares insights on the 2020 election, its implications for the next two years, and assuming Vice President Biden becomes president, how he may govern on K-12 education. They discuss the likely direction of policymaking with regard to charter public schools and school choice, and the influence of the teachers’ unions. Jason offers thoughts about the George Floyd tragedy and protests, the state of race relations across America, and how political, media, civic, and religious leaders could address the country’s deep divisions. Lastly, Jason shares lessons on race, economics, and education from Dr. Thomas Sowell, the subject of his forthcoming biography.

Story of the Week: Dr. Thomas Sowell, Hoover Institution Senior Fellow, describes the legal and regulatory barriers, promoted by the powerful and self-interested teachers’ unions, that prevent more students from attending the charter public schools that are successfully educating low-income minority children across America.

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Today’s “racial justice” icons are markedly different from early civil rights icons. Few of the black men held up as martyrs of alleged institutional racism over the past decade measure up to Rosa Parks. The four innocents murdered in a 1963 KKK bombing of a black church, and the terribly disfigured body of Emmitt Till, […]

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This week on “The Learning Curve,” Cara and Gerard are joined by Devery Anderson, the author of Emmett Till: The Murder That Shocked the World and Propelled the Civil Rights Movement. Today, August 28th, marks the 65th anniversary of the brutal murder of 14-year old Emmett Till, a story which is central to understanding America’s ongoing struggle for civil rights and racial justice. Devery recounts the events at Bryant’s Grocery & Meat Market in Money, Mississippi, which led to the horrific tragedy, and places it in the wider historical context of the Jim Crow South. They discuss Mamie Till-Mobley’s bold decision to make Emmett’s funeral public, with an open casket, and how the event impacted the Civil Rights Movement and its important figures, from Rosa Parks to the late Congressman John Lewis. They also delve into Till’s murderers, their acquittal and later confession, and their fate. The interview concludes with a reading from The Death of Innocence, the heart-wrenching memoir authored by Emmett Till’s courageous mother.

Stories of the Week: Writing in the USA Today, co-host Gerard Robinson explores new poll results on attitudes toward police officers among Black residents in fragile communities. Offering inspiration to millions of young women in STEM fields, a female MIT professor originally from Maine solved a mathematics problem that had stumped experts for half a century. Education insiders are speculating over who would replace USED Secretary Betsy DeVos should she depart after the presidential election.

Commentary Magazine’s Executive Editor Abe Greenwald joined The Federalist’s New York Correspondent David Marcus to discuss the meaning of the national re-examination of the historical value of monuments amid their destruction, the left-wing media’s handling of COVID-19 and President Trump, and New York’s policing practices.

Greenwald argued that the left’s actions have become so separated from their longstanding goals that they are actually advocating for the opposite of their former aim. Their goal is to now upend the American way of life and replace it with something completely different. This is most obvious, Greenwald said, in the change in demands regarding police reform.

Should Cops Get ‘Qualified Immunity?’

 

The United States had just under 700,000 sworn enforcement officers in 2018, of whom 106 were killed in the line of duty that year. These officers are distributed among some 18,000 federal, state, and local police departments, which range in size from 36,000 officers in New York City to ten or fewer in hundreds of smaller towns and hamlets. All these individuals and departments are linked together by their license to use force when necessary to prevent violence and the destruction of property.

This raises a question: What legal regime should be implemented to prevent abuse by police officers?

The widely covered killing of George Floyd this past May—and the protests and looting that quickly followed—stemmed from a widespread lack of confidence in our public institutions. It did not matter that Minnesota Attorney General Keith Ellison brought charges against Derek Chauvin of the Minneapolis Police force, initially of third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter, but later raised to second-degree murder. Nor did it matter that, shortly thereafter, related charges of aiding and abetting the murder were brought against three of Chauvin’s fellow officers: Alexander Keung, Thomas Lane, and Tao Thao.

A Brief Observation on Anti-lynching Laws

 

Senator Tim Scott Even after Senator Tim Scott got Mitch McConnell to agree in advance to allow 20 Democrat amendments to his police reform bill, which included an anti-lynching portion, the Democrats killed the bill by filibuster. Now, if you have been paying a bit of attention to history, this might sound familiar. Yes, indeed, there is a long and ugly history, in the Progressive Era, of Democrat senators filibustering anti-lynching laws every time they came to the Senate floor, and of the Republican leaders not changing the rule to stop this facilitation of race-based political terrorism. Meet the new Senate, same as the old Senate.

In the late 19th and early 20th centuries, states and local governments controlled by white supremacist Democrats blocked blacks from serving on juries and reliability acquitted white men if officials even felt a need to hold a trial over the killing of a black man. The original intent of federal anti-lynching laws was to bypass white supremacist controlled state and local governments, stopping them from providing legal cover, from holding occasional trials of white killers of black men and always acquitting them. It was the norm in segregated states to pervert justice in this way. The point now is some sort of symbolism, as current federal civil rights law already provides ways to prosecute and no jurisdiction has anything like the poisonous conditions of Jim Crow.

Still, this legislation had been revived by Senator Tim Scott and supposed by Democratic Senators Harris and Booker in 2018. Now, they refuse to even allow debate on such a bill. Senator Scott calls them all on their real reason for not letting the bill be debated on the merits: naked electoral politics.

Join Joe Selvaggi and Pioneer Institute’s executive director Jim Stergios for a conversation with Boston Globe columnist Jeff Jacoby about his recent opinion piece on the need to abolish police unions.

 

Join Jim and Greg as they applaud South Carolina Sen. Tim Scott for a pragmatic approach to police reform and for rightly hammering the Democratic characterization of his legislation as a “token” approach. They also rip Chief Justice John Roberts for siding with the four liberal justices in blocking the Trump administration’s effort to end DACA, which was unconstitutionally created in the first place.  And they wade into the ugly back and forth between President Trump and former National Security Adviser John Bolton over Bolton’s scathing new book.

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President Trump, within the limits of the executive branch, has taken several significant steps in police reform. He did so in an executive order issued Monday, June 16, 2020. The focus is on training and transparency. Federal funds will be used, to the extent possible, to incentive states and departments to adopt certifications by existing […]

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This week has culminated with three major meetings between the president, vice president, and African American leaders from a variety of backgrounds. These were all listening rather than top down talking sessions. President Trump started in the White House and then went to a large church in Dallas, Texas. In Dallas, the president set forth […]

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Taking the Risk out of Crime and Putting It on You

 

shutterstock_150668036Over the last two years, much of the national conversation has focused on problems in policing. The basic assumption is that use of force is grossly excessive and frequent. It’s not: Barely one percent of officers use deadly force annually – 80 percent never do.

But the substance of the positions of police “reformers” proves they are more interested in taking the risk out of criminal acts – pushing it onto cops and society – than addressing even the few incidents of truly unjustified police violence. “Reformers” really want to decriminalize crime.

In Pasadena, the case of Kendrec McDade has been front-and-center of this conversation and illustrates exactly this agenda.