Tag: police reform

Commentary Magazine’s Executive Editor Abe Greenwald joined The Federalist’s New York Correspondent David Marcus to discuss the meaning of the national re-examination of the historical value of monuments amid their destruction, the left-wing media’s handling of COVID-19 and President Trump, and New York’s policing practices.

Greenwald argued that the left’s actions have become so separated from their longstanding goals that they are actually advocating for the opposite of their former aim. Their goal is to now upend the American way of life and replace it with something completely different. This is most obvious, Greenwald said, in the change in demands regarding police reform.

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Should Cops Get ‘Qualified Immunity?’

 

The United States had just under 700,000 sworn enforcement officers in 2018, of whom 106 were killed in the line of duty that year. These officers are distributed among some 18,000 federal, state, and local police departments, which range in size from 36,000 officers in New York City to ten or fewer in hundreds of smaller towns and hamlets. All these individuals and departments are linked together by their license to use force when necessary to prevent violence and the destruction of property.

This raises a question: What legal regime should be implemented to prevent abuse by police officers?

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. A Brief Observation on Anti-lynching Laws

 

Senator Tim Scott Even after Senator Tim Scott got Mitch McConnell to agree in advance to allow 20 Democrat amendments to his police reform bill, which included an anti-lynching portion, the Democrats killed the bill by filibuster. Now, if you have been paying a bit of attention to history, this might sound familiar. Yes, indeed, there is a long and ugly history, in the Progressive Era, of Democrat senators filibustering anti-lynching laws every time they came to the Senate floor, and of the Republican leaders not changing the rule to stop this facilitation of race-based political terrorism. Meet the new Senate, same as the old Senate.

In the late 19th and early 20th centuries, states and local governments controlled by white supremacist Democrats blocked blacks from serving on juries and reliability acquitted white men if officials even felt a need to hold a trial over the killing of a black man. The original intent of federal anti-lynching laws was to bypass white supremacist controlled state and local governments, stopping them from providing legal cover, from holding occasional trials of white killers of black men and always acquitting them. It was the norm in segregated states to pervert justice in this way. The point now is some sort of symbolism, as current federal civil rights law already provides ways to prosecute and no jurisdiction has anything like the poisonous conditions of Jim Crow.

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Join Joe Selvaggi and Pioneer Institute’s executive director Jim Stergios for a conversation with Boston Globe columnist Jeff Jacoby about his recent opinion piece on the need to abolish police unions.

 

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Join Jim and Greg as they applaud South Carolina Sen. Tim Scott for a pragmatic approach to police reform and for rightly hammering the Democratic characterization of his legislation as a “token” approach. They also rip Chief Justice John Roberts for siding with the four liberal justices in blocking the Trump administration’s effort to end DACA, which was unconstitutionally created in the first place. And they wade into the ugly back and forth between President Trump and former National Security Adviser John Bolton over Bolton’s scathing new book.

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Member Post

 

President Trump, within the limits of the executive branch, has taken several significant steps in police reform. He did so in an executive order issued Monday, June 16, 2020. The focus is on training and transparency. Federal funds will be used, to the extent possible, to incentive states and departments to adopt certifications by existing […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Member Post

 

This week has culminated with three major meetings between the president, vice president, and African American leaders from a variety of backgrounds. These were all listening rather than top down talking sessions. President Trump started in the White House and then went to a large church in Dallas, Texas. In Dallas, the president set forth […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Taking the Risk out of Crime and Putting It on You

 

shutterstock_150668036Over the last two years, much of the national conversation has focused on problems in policing. The basic assumption is that use of force is grossly excessive and frequent. It’s not: Barely one percent of officers use deadly force annually – 80 percent never do.

But the substance of the positions of police “reformers” proves they are more interested in taking the risk out of criminal acts – pushing it onto cops and society – than addressing even the few incidents of truly unjustified police violence. “Reformers” really want to decriminalize crime.

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