Tag: podcast

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On this episode of the Resistance Library Podcast Sam Jacobs welcomes Tho Bishop onto the show. Tho Bishop is the Assistant Editor of Mises.com and a proud Florida Man. He recently penned an article on a Rothbardian right as an alternative to the paleo-progressivism of Theodore Roosevelt. He believes this to be the fighting ideology […]

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Nick Gillespie is the host of The Reason Interview podcast and editor-at-large at Reason Magazine. He and Bridget discuss the need to create meaning in our lives and why this has driven a lot of American culture insane, how he became a libertarian, Burning Man, his time working for a teen magazine, and why we need a government that does fewer things, but does them well. He shares how attending high school graduations and zoning board meetings radicalized him, the difference between liberals and progressives, how we can build a robust culture by having more arguments, and how he learned almost anything is possible. He and Bridget cover their hope for the future, why Walter Kronkite sucked, the consequences of growing up comfortable, and the truth behind our political parties’ ideologies.

Nancy Rommelman, journalist & author, sits down with Bridget for an in-depth conversation about her feature for Reason Magazine The Dream of The 90’s Dies in Portland, covering the Portland protests. They discuss what the endgame is for people whose skill set only involves destruction, how people are starting to behave in real life the way they do online, how people can become addicted to their “quest for justice,” the reality of what happens when you’ve been cancelled, and why your attitude after experiencing adversity is everything. They also cover the danger of a subscriber model when saying outrageous things and playing the victim gets you attention and an audience, the disconcerting current attitude of trying to pull everybody down rather than lifting them up, how when you weaponize terms you shut down the ability to have conversations, and their hope that the woke will go to sleep eventually. Subscribe to Nancy’s substack Make More Pie.

Cherie DeVille is an adult film star who offers Bridget an inside look at today’s porn industry. They cover how Cherie got into porn, how her parents reacted, why she loves it, the secret to her decade-long career, the perception versus the reality of the industry, the social stigma that comes with it, how it’s changed in the last 10 years, and how women have more power and control in the industry than ever before. They also discuss having an emotionally monogamous relationship, shame, boundaries, the struggle of kids today, how damaging porn addiction can be, the fact that conservatives and pornstars are on the same side when it comes to the arbitrary control and restrictions that financial institutions have over one’s ability to sell a product, and why we should all be terrified of what this means for the future.

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I love the ricochet podcast. Each week, I eagerly anticipate the guests which will be featured. My observation is that typically, guests are on the show about 15 minutes. These are precious minutes, as many of these guests have unique insights unavailable from anyone else. Preview Open

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Ryan Long, comedian and filmmaker, connects with Bridget from New York and they discuss his move from Canada five months before the pandemic hit, why NYC is a sadboy town, the challenges of being a self-starter and your own boss, the outrage economy, why good editors are so hard to find, and why Canada is dead to him. In the middle of their conversation Bridget receives breaking news of the lockdown at the Capitol on January 6th but that doesn’t derail the conversation. They delve into how Hollywood woke culture feels like a last ditch attempt  to maintain their status as gatekeepers, why Millennials are really just young Boomers in disguise, the difference between British comedy, American comedy, and Australian comedy, and how finding a way to turn something you might get mad about into something funny is a means of undermining your anger.

Desi-Rae is a sociopolitical commentator, crypto enthusiast, and artist who started her talk show Just Thinking Out Loud, after she realized she felt conflicted about honestly speaking her mind. Originally from Jamaica, she offers her perspective on US politics, how you used to be able to disagree with someone and still be friends with them, why she hates identity politics, and how people were always assuming what she thought because she’s black. She and Bridget discuss whether being racist or sexist is the worst vice a person can have, the cost of cutting family members out of your life, how victimhood requires constantly looking for oppressors, why we should ask people to learn about the parts of themselves they don’t like, and how everyone in America is rich compared to the rest of the world.

Tori Perrotti, aka “Target Tori,” talks with Bridget about her experience going viral, cyber-bullying, cancel culture, and the amazing positive support she received that inspired her to found the Pause. Be Kind platform. They discuss what they’ve each learned in the service industry, being an only child vs. the oldest of five, trade stories about being bullied in high school and how those experiences shaped them, and notice why it’s so hard to think of others in any given situation. Tori shares her desire to take what happened to her and use the opportunity to create something bigger, to spread a positive message, and to do something that would make her feel more fulfilled and contribute to society. It’s a refreshing and uplifting conversation in the midst of these darkly cynical times.

Corey DeAngelis is the director of School Choice at Reason Foundation and the Executive Director at Educational Freedom Institute. Corey and Bridget discuss school choice, which would mean allowing a tax payer’s education dollars to follow their child to wherever they’re getting their education – public school, private school, or charter school – rather than automatically being paid to their local school district. They delve into the effects of Covid and how families are seeing their school system leaving them high and dry while still getting their children’s education dollars, why school choice would be good for individual teachers, and where the money being poured into the school system is actually going. They also cover why this shouldn’t be a partisan issue since it’s a market-based reform in education and an equalizer in society, and they explore some of the arguments against school choice. Don’t miss Corey’s book School Choice Myths: Setting the Record Straight on Education Freedom.

Karol Markowicz (New York Post, Spectator USA, Time) and Bridget discuss the effect of the pandemic in NYC, how nobody in California seems to be able to connect policies they hate and the people they’re voting for, why large portions of immigrant communities love Trump, looking back and seeing their own blindspots going into 2016, and the best and worst case scenarios for how the 2020 election might go. They cover the future of the Democratic party, why Karol tries to bring up the fact that she’s a conservative very early in a conversation with a new person, whether she fears for her safety being an outspoken conservative in a liberal place, and why she doesn’t worry about what she’s going to tell her grandchildren about who she voted for.

Bridget & Maggie reminisce about 100 episodes of Walk-Ins Welcome. What they love, what they’ve learned, favorite episodes, and they marvel at their unprecedented consistency. They explore Bridget’s gift of gab and her genuine love for talking to people (inherited from their grandmother), discuss the need for a Hero’s Journey and how lost we can become without one, and plan for the future and what they’d like to see happen for the podcast and Phetasy. Become a subscriber at phetasy.com or make a donation and support another 100 episodes!

David French (The Dispatch, Time) stops in to talk about his latest book Divided We Fall: America’s Secession Threat and How to Restore Our Nation. He and Bridget cover how he sources his news, the liberation of shedding the partisan mindset and meeting in the wasteland of the center, the rise of journavism, being expelled from your tribe, taking precautions against being “swatted” by online trolls, and the times they wonder if it’s worth it. They discuss the differences between this election and 2016, take issue with the idea of voting for “the lesser of two evils” when the response should be “don’t vote for evil,” examine how our rage and hatred are what will destroy our country, and ask the question, what kind of country do we aspire to and how should I behave as a human being to try and reach this aspiration?

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I just listened to the two most recent (28 and 29 Sept) “3 Martini Lunch” podcasts, and they open with an ad from, of all people, the Biden campaign. Not what I would expect to hear on a Ricochet podcast, but when you’re an important and widely-followed media empire, this type of thing was going […]

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Katie Herzog (podcast host Blocked and Reported) and Bridget have a hilarious conversation that covers everything from Katie’s multiple drunken bicycle accidents, to Bridget’s being put on male-restriction when she was in rehab for heroin. They talk addiction, alcoholism, their first exposure to gender pronouns, teaching yoga in Sri Lanka, The Babes of NPR, and how your darkest moments can lead to new opportunities. Katie shares her many failures in holding down a job before working her way into freelance writing, and how an article on Detransitioning in The Stranger made her one of the most hated people in Seattle.

Buck Angel is a 58 year-old trans man who is speaking out against the mob mentality that has taken over the trans community. He and Bridget discuss his life before his transition, how he was essentially a human “guinea pig” in the early days of his transition, the long road and struggle for acceptance, and how the trans movement of today has developed something of a “cult-like” ideology where if you don’t speak and think in a specific way, they don’t want you as a member. He and Bridget discuss the “trans trenders,” the rewriting of factual information, why the label “cis” feels derogatory, how there’s no oversight and no system in allowing young people to self-diagnose as “trans,” being attacked by his own community, and why we should follow the money on the sudden push to enable sexual reassignment surgeries. As an elderly trans person whose own transition saved his life, Buck is passionate about the dangers he sees in the community today, and the fact that this push to transition will kill people.

John Wood Jr. comes by to talk about Braver Angels, the largest grassroots bipartisan organization in America, focused on the work of political de-polarization. Along the way he and Bridget have a fascinating conversation about his experience being raised by a mother who’s a liberal black Democrat from inner city LA and father who’s a conservative white Republican from Tennessee, and how his white father emphasized the greatness of black culture in the context of the greatness of America and made him proud of being a black man.  He and Bridget bond over their similar experiences dealing with their parents’ divorces. They cover how you can engage conflict without suffering the debilitating impact of hatred in your own psychology, being chameleons growing up and learning to integrate all the different parts of themselves as they grew older, how important it is to see the human behind the opinion – especially when it’s one you don’t agree with,  what’s truly noble and redeemable in all of our American traditions, and whether Trump is actually racist.

Yascha Mounk is the founder of Persuasion, an online community and publication for people who believe in the importance of the social practice of persuasion, and are determined to defend free speech and free inquiry against all its enemies. They seek to persuade people who disagree with them, rather than to mock or troll them. He and Bridget discuss the rise of the populism, why status anxiety is the strongest predictor of populist movement in society, the idea of white fragility, and why exhorting whites in the US to take on a strong collective racial identity is not the way to build a fair, multi-ethnic democracy in this country. They look at how many authoritarian leaders have come to power in the last 20 years, share their hope for the future, and examine the idea that many Americans don’t want to win the culture war, they want the culture war to go away.

 

Thomas Chatterton Williams (Losing My Cool, Self-Portrait In Black and White) talks with Bridget from France and discusses the view of America from another country, the European response to Covid-19 vs. the US’s, and why the Unites States plays a central role in the imagination of the whole world. Thomas explains how he wound up “accidentally” writing a memoir about the difference between the black culture his dad grew up in from the one he grew up in, America’s historic attitude about race, and how his having his daughter who “looks like a Swedish child” led him to reassess what he’d previously written and his thoughts about the “construct” of race. He and Bridget cover why the hyper focus on racial difference is not the way to get past our divisions, the narcissism in the idea that whiteness in itself is responsible for all that’s wrong, why emigrating to another country was the hardest thing he’s ever done, and what he misses most about America.

Full transcript available here: WiW88-ThomasChattertonWilliams-Transcript

My Joe Rogan Experience

 

Joe Rogan
Screenshot from Joe Rogan Experience channel on YouTube

Joe Rogan to many people is the guy from Fear Factor or a comedian and to many others like myself he is an important male role model in society. In a world where young men are taught to be ashamed of their masculinity or told they are toxic, Joe Rogan stands alone showing that men can be both athletic and smart, firm yet fair and assertive yet kind. Rogan is truly curious and open-minded; he will talk to anyone from any political point of view. His guests range from Democratic Socialist Cornel West to Ben Shapiro. Rogan’s podcast threatens the mainstream, because the days of unintelligent and frankly uninteresting talking points may end or be altered so journalists and commentators will actually have to do the job of questioning and getting to the truth.

My dad introduced to me the Joe Rogan Experience when I was 17 and he was, unfortunately, in another battle with drugs. I was 17 depressed and usually angry. I was aware of those problems and sometimes acted impulsively, filled with anger and was depressed to the point of self-harm. Those issues are now long gone thanks to my family, finding meaning in my life through God, though I am always an imperfect Christian man of course. I cleaned up my act a lot when I was 17 going on 18. Of course, I struggled, I discovered politics and was ardently conservative I would argue with everyone and anyone over politics, but this is exhausting and not healthy. I saw myself becoming what I accused liberals of being: Intolerable, angry, and very tribal. As of 2017/18 due to quite an embarrassing display of decorum, I do not debate with people online because I was not mature enough to handle it and now I realize I am confident enough in my own opinions so for me there is no need to “own the libs” online. Politics was not apart of my life it was consuming my life. It is fairly common for young people that participate in politics to have politics consume them. I would defend every conservative talking point even if I had my own reservations. As I discovered when politics becomes your only identity you will defend it no matter what. I was convinced that conceding mistakes and policies made me weak, but a man who concedes nothing all the time is an insecure man and one who only concedes is a weak men, confident men follow their own path. I am not very good at lying to myself so the behavior stopped because I did not like that intellectual dishonesty.