Tag: podcast

Katie Herzog (podcast host Blocked and Reported) and Bridget have a hilarious conversation that covers everything from Katie’s multiple drunken bicycle accidents, to Bridget’s being put on male-restriction when she was in rehab for heroin. They talk addiction, alcoholism, their first exposure to gender pronouns, teaching yoga in Sri Lanka, The Babes of NPR, and how your darkest moments can lead to new opportunities. Katie shares her many failures in holding down a job before working her way into freelance writing, and how an article on Detransitioning in The Stranger made her one of the most hated people in Seattle.

Buck Angel is a 58 year-old trans man who is speaking out against the mob mentality that has taken over the trans community. He and Bridget discuss his life before his transition, how he was essentially a human “guinea pig” in the early days of his transition, the long road and struggle for acceptance, and how the trans movement of today has developed something of a “cult-like” ideology where if you don’t speak and think in a specific way, they don’t want you as a member. He and Bridget discuss the “trans trenders,” the rewriting of factual information, why the label “cis” feels derogatory, how there’s no oversight and no system in allowing young people to self-diagnose as “trans,” being attacked by his own community, and why we should follow the money on the sudden push to enable sexual reassignment surgeries. As an elderly trans person whose own transition saved his life, Buck is passionate about the dangers he sees in the community today, and the fact that this push to transition will kill people.

John Wood Jr. comes by to talk about Braver Angels, the largest grassroots bipartisan organization in America, focused on the work of political de-polarization. Along the way he and Bridget have a fascinating conversation about his experience being raised by a mother who’s a liberal black Democrat from inner city LA and father who’s a conservative white Republican from Tennessee, and how his white father emphasized the greatness of black culture in the context of the greatness of America and made him proud of being a black man. He and Bridget bond over their similar experiences dealing with their parents’ divorces. They cover how you can engage conflict without suffering the debilitating impact of hatred in your own psychology, being chameleons growing up and learning to integrate all the different parts of themselves as they grew older, how important it is to see the human behind the opinion – especially when it’s one you don’t agree with, what’s truly noble and redeemable in all of our American traditions, and whether Trump is actually racist.

Yascha Mounk is the founder of Persuasion, an online community and publication for people who believe in the importance of the social practice of persuasion, and are determined to defend free speech and free inquiry against all its enemies. They seek to persuade people who disagree with them, rather than to mock or troll them. He and Bridget discuss the rise of the populism, why status anxiety is the strongest predictor of populist movement in society, the idea of white fragility, and why exhorting whites in the US to take on a strong collective racial identity is not the way to build a fair, multi-ethnic democracy in this country. They look at how many authoritarian leaders have come to power in the last 20 years, share their hope for the future, and examine the idea that many Americans don’t want to win the culture war, they want the culture war to go away.

 

Thomas Chatterton Williams (Losing My Cool, Self-Portrait In Black and White) talks with Bridget from France and discusses the view of America from another country, the European response to Covid-19 vs. the US’s, and why the Unites States plays a central role in the imagination of the whole world. Thomas explains how he wound up “accidentally” writing a memoir about the difference between the black culture his dad grew up in from the one he grew up in, America’s historic attitude about race, and how his having his daughter who “looks like a Swedish child” led him to reassess what he’d previously written and his thoughts about the “construct” of race. He and Bridget cover why the hyper focus on racial difference is not the way to get past our divisions, the narcissism in the idea that whiteness in itself is responsible for all that’s wrong, why emigrating to another country was the hardest thing he’s ever done, and what he misses most about America.

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. My Joe Rogan Experience

 
Joe Rogan
Screenshot from Joe Rogan Experience channel on YouTube

Joe Rogan to many people is the guy from Fear Factor or a comedian and to many others like myself he is an important male role model in society. In a world where young men are taught to be ashamed of their masculinity or told they are toxic, Joe Rogan stands alone showing that men can be both athletic and smart, firm yet fair and assertive yet kind. Rogan is truly curious and open-minded; he will talk to anyone from any political point of view. His guests range from Democratic Socialist Cornel West to Ben Shapiro. Rogan’s podcast threatens the mainstream, because the days of unintelligent and frankly uninteresting talking points may end or be altered so journalists and commentators will actually have to do the job of questioning and getting to the truth.

My dad introduced to me the Joe Rogan Experience when I was 17 and he was, unfortunately, in another battle with drugs. I was 17 depressed and usually angry. I was aware of those problems and sometimes acted impulsively, filled with anger and was depressed to the point of self-harm. Those issues are now long gone thanks to my family, finding meaning in my life through God, though I am always an imperfect Christian man of course. I cleaned up my act a lot when I was 17 going on 18. Of course, I struggled, I discovered politics and was ardently conservative I would argue with everyone and anyone over politics, but this is exhausting and not healthy. I saw myself becoming what I accused liberals of being: Intolerable, angry, and very tribal. As of 2017/18 due to quite an embarrassing display of decorum, I do not debate with people online because I was not mature enough to handle it and now I realize I am confident enough in my own opinions so for me there is no need to “own the libs” online. Politics was not apart of my life it was consuming my life. It is fairly common for young people that participate in politics to have politics consume them. I would defend every conservative talking point even if I had my own reservations. As I discovered when politics becomes your only identity you will defend it no matter what. I was convinced that conceding mistakes and policies made me weak, but a man who concedes nothing all the time is an insecure man and one who only concedes is a weak men, confident men follow their own path. I am not very good at lying to myself so the behavior stopped because I did not like that intellectual dishonesty.

Member Post

 

Our own Sam Jacobs sat down with Matthew Larosiere. Matthew Larosiere is the Director of Legal Policy at the Firearms Policy Coalition and an unashamed supporter of the Second Amendment without exceptions. He is also an early adopter of the 3D printer, something that he has become very skilled at using to make full firearms, […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Chloe Valdary (The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, The Atlantic) returns to discuss her new course Theory of Enchantment an innovative social-emotional, learning course that teaches character development, resilience and love. Her background in international diplomacy and conflict resolution led her to want to create a framework that teaches people how to love each other. The aspirational course blends pop culture and ancient wisdom to teach social and emotional learning and Chloe felt it was necessary as an antidote to the deconstructive ideology that’s permeating our culture right now. She and Bridget discuss why having no reverence for the past leaves us with no way to measure our progress, why we should see suffering as a gift, how people stereotyping others means they also stereotype themselves, and why the world is ending when people no longer dance with each other.

Abigail Shrier, author of Irreversible Damage: The Transgender Craze Seducing Our Daughters, sits down with Bridget for a fascinating, in-depth and controversial conversation about the wave of transgender-identifying females sweeping various countries around the world. For the first time in history the predominant demographic of people identifying as “transgender” is teenage girls with no childhood history of gender dysphoria. Abigail and Bridget discuss how we got here, where this came from, and the social, educational and cultural influences playing a part in this unprecedented trend. They cover the role of teachers, therapists, social media influencers and activists, as well as the dynamics of teenage girl friend groups that make them particularly susceptible to the unconscious pressures and social rewards of coming out as “trans.” They discuss the long-term physical and mental damage that can result from a system that demands immediate affirmation from professionals, rather than a careful and considered approach to a complicated topic which can have permanent consequences.

Fox News Senior Political Analyst Brit Hume joined host Ben Domenech to discuss race relations in America and how the issue has been politically manipulated by the left.

Hume argued that, since the nation reached an overwhelming consensus against racism, marked by the passage of the Civil Right Act, movements such as Black Lives Matter are capitalizing on that sentiment to usher in a new era with a different agenda. A movement that was once about tearing down barriers has switched to focus on tearing down statues.

In 2018 Nikki Mark’s 12-year old son, Tommy, went to sleep one night and never woke up. In an inspiring and heartbreaking conversation with Bridget shares her immediate reaction, what she’s learned, why she said yes to everything that came her way, the project she channeled her grief into, her family’s bond, and the incredible outpouring of support they received from their community. She and Bridget discuss how we’re not taught to deal with death or support someone who is struggling with tragedy, and how if we learned a little bit more about death we’d learn how to live. Her fierce determination to share the lessons her son taught her, her belief that she can turn the pain into something else and rise up to live in a way that honors her son, the knowledge that we should all be playing more and that life is supposed to be fun, and her ability to see the beauty in overwhelming tragedy, is an inspiration and motivation for anyone struggling through darkness. Support the TM23 Foundation to honor Tommy’s memory & legacy.

Yesha Callahan (Essence Magazine) and Bridget bond over their shared fear of being trampled in a crowd, their mutual disdain for agents, and marvel at the spectacular idiocy of people behaving badly in public in the age of camera phones. Yesha covers growing up poor in a house full of extended family, what led her to a career in HR, and how she jumped into a career as a writer on a late night talk show. She shares her darkest moments after being laid off and struggling to support her son, working as a freelance writer, and taking the advice of a best friend to “act like a white lady” and ask for a job at The Root. She and Bridget discuss Black Lives Matter, why she loves TikTok, why she doesn’t believe that struggle makes you stronger, how white people are afraid of saying anything wrong, and the least racist country she’s ever traveled to.

Full transcript available here: WiW84-YeshaCallahan-Transcript

Jason Riley joined host Ben Domenech to discuss the recent changes in the Black Lives Matter movement and its demand to defund the police. Riley, a columnist at the Wall Street Journal, senior fellow at the Manhattan Institute, and a contributor at Fox News, delves into how the media has influenced such ideas.

Riley argued the recent protests as well as events prior were in part caused by the media for failing to provide realistic data on police force, particularly regarding race. The media, he said, has scared people into believing a false narrative about police brutality by giving special attention to isolated incidents.

Andrew Heaton (comedian, author, political satirist, podcast host) drops by for a fun and wide-ranging conversation covering everything from dogs vs. cats, why he wants to live on a compound, why comics make the worst audience members, the over-sensitization of language, and the thankless task of being a voice of reason in a tribal world. He and Bridget discuss their fear of living alone for too long and the worry that their weird habits will calcify, why living in New York City only works if you’re really hot, really young, or really rich, how humans are evolutionarily designed to be members of a tribe, the difference between thinking someone is wrong and thinking someone is evil, the death of nuance, the outrage economy, the decline of mainstream media, and why people are less concerned about what you think than about the wording you use to communicate it. Keep up with Andrew on his website MightyHeaton.com

Full transcript available here: WiW83-AndrewHeaton-Transcript

The Federalist New York Correspondent David Marcus joined host Ben Domenech to discuss the state of the nation during the lockdown, protests, and calls for police to be defunded. Marcus discussed the general opinion of those from New York regarding police and how politicians are responding.

Marcus observed that New Yorkers are largely ready to open businesses back up, especially in Brooklyn. Additionally, he argues people in New York view the police favorably, and the protesters downtown are out of touch with what the majority of people think as they call to defund the police.

Coach Tea is back for a frank conversation with Bridget about George Floyd, the protests, the riots, the looting, the Black Lives Matter movement, and the concept of white privilege. They discuss the frustration that a real issue has become a Trojan horse for all sorts of other agendas, how the movement has been co-opted, why solutions need to be personal and not legislated, and the problem with the argument “if you’re silent, you’re part of the problem.” They cover how capitalism fights racism, why the phrase “for the greater good” is so terrifying, how insanity is always louder than sanity, and the underlying insult inherent in white people apologizing for their privilege.

**Warning** This episode is not for the easily offended and is more explicit than usual. Full transcript available here: WiW82-CoachTea-Transcript

Sam Harris (author, philosopher, neuroscientist) has a fascinating conversation with Bridget about meditation, consciousness, mindfulness, and awareness. They discuss what brought Sam to meditation (drugs, initially), and the decade he spent traveling and diving into Eastern philosophy, mindfulness practices, and silent retreats, until ultimately he went back to college and eventually got a PhD in cognitive neuroscience. He and Bridget cover mediation and psychological resilience, being a hostage to your own thoughts, the search for a durable state of well being, the casualties of the spiritual path and the people who follow it, the illusion of self, and how close we are to being psychotic so much of the time.

Full transcript available here: WiW80-SamHarris-Transcript

Dave Rubin joins Bridget for his second appearance on the podcast. They talk the long-term effects and changes brought about by social distancing, staying in touch with friends and family now more than ever, no longer looking at the world through a political party lens, how to support small businesses during the shut down, and wonder if the government can’t help people in a time like this, what’s the point of government. They share their small successes, like Dave’s new garden and Bridget’s perfect loaf of sourdough, discuss how irrelevant things like the NBA and celebrities have become, and offer show and movie recommendations. They also cover the future of the Democratic party, how government is all about solving another problem it created and discuss Dave’s new book Don’t Burn This Book.

Full transcript available here: WiW77-DaveRubin-Transcript

Member Post

 

Are you a fan of Dan Carlin, George Friedman, Stephen Kotkin, and Victor Davis Hanson? Read More View Post

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Samantha Shahi (aka Sammy Flap-n-Folds to the Dumpster Fire crowd) finally, finally sits down with Bridget to discuss her journey from Texas to LA, being a marching band nerd, how she fell in love with producing, and the shocking secret reason she minored in Women’s Studies. They cover the litany of jobs Sam’s had since she moved here, what she’s learned along the way, where her true passion lies, and Bridget makes Sam tell the story that demonstrates how Type A she actually is. What do you do when your brain commits hate crimes against you? Did Bridget actually rescue Sam from a cult? Was Sam a sacrificial virgin thrown into a volcano in a past life? It’s all covered in this week’s episode.

Full transcript available here: WiW76-SamanthaShahi-Transcript