Tag: Pittsburgh

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The problem with working is that I have to rely on Lileks to find out when I’ve missed a great post, so it’s always too late for me to comment. But both of Doc Robert’s posts ( Why We Need People Who Have ‘Too Much Money’ and Memories of the Cleveland Orchestra, 10/4/19) strike near […]

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John Tierney joins City Journal assistant editor Charles McElwee to discuss Pittsburgh’s recent resurgence.

“If you want to see how to revive a city—and how not to,” John Tierney writes, “go to Pittsburgh.” Pittsburgh has transformed itself from the Steel City to western Pennsylvania’s hub of “eds” and “meds.” But before that could happen, the city nearly destroyed itself under various misguided urban plans dating back to the 1950s.

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It’s been a week now, but it’s still infuriating. Hollywood celebrities, in a wretched orgy of self-indulgent Trump-hate, blamed, and continue to blame, the president and everyone who voted for him for the synagogue shooting in Pittsburgh. But then it wasn’t exactly a bombshell that a bunch of punk-ass actors – most of whom don’t […]

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Democratic presidents and anti-Semites

 

Some on the Left are attempting to blame Trump and Republicans for the killings last Saturday in Pittsburgh. But the last two Democratic presidents have appeared with notorious anti-Semites:

1. Obama and Rev. Wright: he claimed in 2009 that “Them Jews ain’t going to let him (Obama) talk to me.” Wright then said that he meant to use Zionists not Jews. This is a distinction without a difference. One might argue that this is after Obama broke with Wright in 2008. He claimed that he’d never heard Wright make the incendiary comments which came to light in 2008. But in 2004 he stated to a local Chicago reporter that he was in Wright’s church every Sunday. His claim of ignorance about Wright’s opinions strains credulity.

The Lonely Man with a Gun

 

Another lonely man with a gun has murdered innocents. Whether you call it mass murder or terrorism or a hate crime, it doesn’t matter. And as a Jew, I am deeply concerned about the rise of antisemitism. But there is something that cuts across these all to frequent acts of violence. It’s almost always a lonely man with a gun. Understandably, there’s a lot of focus on the gun part. But I want to think about the lonely man.

There is a debate in economics about our standard of living in the United States and a debate about the relationship between happiness and material well-being. What is missing from these conversations among economists and non-economists is the importance of meaning in our lives, our longing to belong, our desire to be important and to matter. These urges are not fulfilled by material goods. They never can be.

I don’t think it’s a coincidence that almost all of the acts of mass murder and terrorism are committed by men, mostly lonely men, disaffected, alienated from modern life, alienated from the standard of success our culture aspires to, disconnected from those around them. No one pays much attention to them until people are forced to pay attention at the point of a gun. No one pays much attention until the headlines that scream that these lonely men have finally achieved something people are going to have to notice.

Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America recoil in horror as an avowed neo-Nazi opens fire in a Pittsburgh-area synagogue, killing eleven people and wounding others because he thought all Jews needed to die.  They also discuss the liberal insistence that this is the year young voters really show up at the polls, but early voting does not suggest that’s happening.  And they roll their eyes as Twitter considers scrapping the “like” button to stop hateful messages from going viral.  They also react in very different ways following the Bears’ win over the Jets on Sunday.

If I Can Be “Semi-Spontaneous,” Does That Mean I Can Be “Partially Pregnant?”

 

Yesterday, as I was engaged in some family business, driving up and down Interstate 70, one of the ugliest, and one of my least favorite, pieces of road in Western Pennsylvania, I heard an odd report on the news. Figuring that perhaps I was hallucinating, I actually made a point of listening at the top of the next hour, just so I could hear it again. The following is a paraphrase, but fairly closely resembles the actual report:

“Pittsburgh police have announced that they are gearing up for possible riots should President Donald Trump fire special counsel Robert Mueller. The police have received a email report that there is a widespread belief that Trump may fire Mueller, and that if that occurs, extensive protests are being planned in the city. The protests are being described as semi-spontaneous and would likely happen on short notice (emphasis added).”

Three cheers (I guess) for the Pittsburgh Police for their sincere desire to keep their fellow citizens safe. (I’ve had a number of dealings with the Pittsburgh Police over the years, and they are fine people.) But I can’t help wondering if it’s typical for law enforcement to respond so directly, so publicly, and so forcefully to an anonymous “tip” detailing simply that there is a “widespread belief” that something may happen, and that if it does, all sorts of semi-spontaneous hell is going to break loose (if you want to know what I mean, just Google “Pittsburgh police Trump fire Mueller” to see the dozens and dozens of hysterical national news stories about this).

Driverless Car Valley: The Pittsburgh Model for Innovation

 

twenty20_bdf65ad4-99da-4864-bfff-3fee1ac5bfb4_pittsburgh-e1473711161177You don’t have to work in Silicon Valley or at the US Chamber of Commerce to think entrepreneurship is key to a nation’s economic growth and rising living standards. The Chinese government is a big fan, too. As a recent New York Times piece, “Venture Communism,” notes, “Premier Li Keqiang frequently calls for ‘mass entrepreneurship.’ In March at the National People’s Congress, he bragged that 12,000 new companies were founded each day in 2015.”

But of course Beijing isn’t going to leave everything up to the invisible hand and foot of free enterprise and competition and creative destruction. Government will be there to nudge things along. The piece highlights how the provincial capital of Hangzhou has started its own tech startup hub — with the on-the-nose same of Dream Town — where “businesses … get a slate of benefits like subsidized rent, cash handouts and special training, all courtesy of the city.”

Now this doesn’t sound a whole lot different from what a lot of American government officials think is needed to create their own mini-Silicon Valleys or innovation centers. In a 2014 Politico piece, venture capitalist Marc Andreessen describes the American flavor of the recipe this way:

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Throughout the Republican campaign, many conservatives (here and elsewhere) have been frustrated by Trump’s lack of specificity when it comes to his Presidential plans. What exactly does he mean when he says he wants to “Make America Great Again?” Well, I think things are beginning to clear up. Preview Open

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In just a few weeks, Pittsburgh’s Downtown Macy’s will join the list of Things That Aren’t There Anymore. Of course, Macy’s was already a stand-in for Kaufmann’s, a regional department store chain that isn’t there anymore. The Kaufmann’s clock is still there. That’s where Pittsburghers like to meet. “Meet me under the Kaufmann’s clock,” we […]

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Target Sues 4 Heroes Who Stopped a Knife Attack in Their Store

 

TurnerTwo years ago, a homeless man randomly stabbed Jobe Wright in the shoulder and ran off. Wright and three of his friends went looking for the attacker on the streets of Pittsburgh and learned he had fled into a nearby Target store. They went in after him in order to hold him until the police arrived.

That’s when things got even uglier. One of the victim’s friends, Michael Turner, described what happened when they found the attacker, 41-year-old Leon Walls.

“I entered Target, I run up the escalator, I make a right, that’s when I encountered Walls in the store,” said Turner. The two exchanged words as Turner held a baseball bat he had brought in for protection.