Tag: pesach

Passover, Houses of Worship, and Intimacy

 

On Passover/Pesach I spent a sweet and deeply moving (and fun) time at the @iwe family seders. It’s not unusual for them to last until 1:30 to 2 a.m., and I’ve been told those are short ones! As always, they were inspiring and educational, and I’ve so enjoyed being with the iwe family for Pesach over the last four years.

During the seder, we spend a lot of time asking questions and discussing many aspects of the exodus from Egypt and the purpose of the rituals we practice. At one point (although I don’t remember the specific context), the topic came up of the Beis HaMikdash, the Second Temple built by Herod, expanding on the ruins of the first. Consider that Herod’s purpose was not just to bring people together and to honor G-d, but to build a magnificent monument to Herod’s power and glory. In fact, the Second Temple was a huge facility but might have lacked spiritual warmth. That might not have been the kind of building that G-d had commanded to be built.

I thought about this comment and realized that Herod’s Temple may have been more about Herod than G-d, and it lacked one very important ingredient to connecting with G-d: intimacy.

Sharing the Sacred

 

I’m flying out very early tomorrow morning (my husband calls it the middle of the night!) to fly to the @iwe family for Passover. I want to wish all my Jewish friends a very special celebration for this time commemorating freedom, connection, and holiness. I also want to wish my Christian friends a very blessed Easter celebration.

Although our holidays are different, we all share a love of G-d, a spiritual connection and the joy of living in a country that allows us to worship as we choose. May we all appreciate that which we share together, as well as those things we honor that are uniquely part of our traditions. Blessings all!

Member Post

 

For some Jews, the Passover or Pesach holiday in the Spring is one of the most treasured of all the Jewish holidays. The celebration of G-d’s freeing the Jews from the Egyptians is called “seder,” which means “order.” In part, the name suggests that a particular order is followed for this meal at this auspicious […]

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Next Year in Jerusalem!

 

I had no sooner walked through the front door with Son #1 when I was attacked and hugged by a delighted child, Son #5. I have never, ever been greeted so enthusiastically, anywhere. Son #5 had seen me the past two years when I went to the @iWe home for the Passover/Pesach celebration. He was either very pleased to see me (or was counting on my reading him some stories during my stay). Then Son #1 instructed him matter-of-factly to take my carry-on bag and backpack up to my room, two and one-half flights up. And this same Son #5, uncoached, pulled out my chair for me at the Seder meals. Did I mention he is seven years old and 4’1” tall (so he tells me)?

When I entered the iWe home, I had entered the space of timelessness and antiquity, of celebration and remembering the suffering in leaving the slavery of Egypt. This Pesach celebration, like the past two years, was a time of sweetness, poignancy, history, and memories. The iWe family takes both seriously and joyfully their celebration of Pesach, and I can’t imagine being anywhere else to connect to my Jewish roots with both moments of sadness and much happiness.

Although I’ve only been to one other orthodox Seder, I believe iWe when he says theirs is not the ordinary Seder. We follow the order of the meal (seder means order), but everyone is encouraged to ask any question about Pesach. Silly questions don’t earn a piece of candy, but good questions do. I even asked a pretty good question this year, and iWe kindly acknowledged its relevance (although I suspect he says that to all his guests). The three oldest boys carried on a fascinating discussion about one portion of the Exodus story, running up and down the stairs to bring Jewish source books to back up their arguments. Their joy in possibly identifying a new way of looking at this 3,000-year-old story was palpable. (It’s hard to know if anyone outside the room would have accepted their theory, but it was very bright and creative.) And the singing, ah, the singing. When iWe sings with his older boys in sweet harmony, we are all transported to a time of deserts, hardship, freedom, and joy.

Member Post

 

Passover (Pesach in Hebrew) is one of the most important celebrations of the Jewish people. Like so many of the holidays, it focuses on engaging the children at every level: the sensory, the emotional, the sacred, and the story. It also calls us not just to remember the suffering of over 400 years of slavery […]

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Frequently my immediate family and I gather with other family members for the first night of Passover, or sometimes we have guests, but this year it will just be the seven of us, with our oldest away at college, so we’ll try at least one new recipe. My menu currently is: Israeli salad, with cucumbers, […]

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Tonight we host the biggest collection of Ricochet-members to date at our Seder! We have iWe, kidcoder, I Shot the Serif, #2 son (who only lurks, but has a blacksmithy-type-handle), with a guest starring role for the 5th Rico-person… I’ll let her speak for herself as and when she chooses to do so! The table […]

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Deadlines are malleable, flexible. Most people recognize, after a lifetime of “fake” deadlines, that deadlines are really just artificial targets, goals rather than ultimatums. If not outright falsehoods, deadlines are at least “padded”; think of the admonition to “arrive 2 hours before the flight.” These deadlines are a way of forcing people to get their […]

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Here at Toad Hall, we love watching Jewish holiday videos from AISH. Don’t know much about the group other than that they make some rockin’ videos to some trashy pop music that are always much better than the actual music they are parodying. Here’s this year’s offering: Preview Open

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