Tag: Pearl Harbor

Saying the Quiet Part Out Loud: Pelosi on J6

 

One of the emerging traits of growing older (I’m 65) is blunt honesty. Our guard goes down with age as we become less concerned about what others around us may think. We blurt unvarnished truths and observations, often impulsively and increasingly inure to their consequences.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, who has graced the lower House chamber since 1987 and as its leading Democratic official since 2003, will turn 82 on March 26th. And during a solemn January 6th commemorative event in the Capitol, she said the quiet part about the festivities out loud.

Before their martini consumption, Jim and Greg remember Pearl Harbor 80 years after the Japanese attack that launched our nation into World War II and all the heroes who have served our nation. Then they go through new studies showing once again that raising the minimum wage leads to employees losing their jobs. They also recoil as the Biden White House tries to convince major media outlets that the president deserves much better coverage on the economy. And they get the popcorn ready as Chris Cuomo is reportedly preparing to sue CNN for the money remaining on his contract.

 

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I just finished the five-hour documentary series on the Pearl Harbor attack by YouTube™ channel World War Two. This goes minute-by-minute through the attack from both the Japanese and American perspective. It gives the history of the ships and planes involved, thumbnail biographies of the admirals and politicians, and an overview of the events leading […]

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I started thinking about this back in July.  (The 20th to be specific.) And here we are on September 11th.  (This will not be the most somber 9-11 thread. But now as then, perhaps we need the laugh.  Buy me enough whisky and I’ll tell you what made me laugh that week.) December 7th. November […]

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Seventy-six years ago, following the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, America went to war. Victor Davis Hanson, Hoover senior fellow and author of The Second World Wars: How the First Global Conflict Was Fought and Won, discusses lessons learned from that conflict’s successes and failures and how they apply today.

Remembering Pearl Harbor

 

Doris “Dorie” Miller was a Mess Attendant working on the USS West Virginia. Like most mornings, he rose before dawn for a dreary day of hauling trash, scrubbing dishes and prepping food for the battleship’s cook. While collecting the crew’s laundry, the General Quarters alarm sounded. Ships have drills all the time — even on Sunday mornings — but a sailor still must answer the call.

However this time he couldn’t get to his designated battle station. The torpedo-twisted metal proved this alarm was for real.

With nowhere else to report, Dorie ran to the deck to see what was happening. Being a former fullback for his Waco, Texas high school, one of the officers told him to carry the wounded to safety. Soon he was told the ship’s captain was seriously wounded and trapped on the bridge. After bringing the mortally-wounded officer through the fire and blood to a safer place, Dorie saw a .50 caliber Browning without a gunner.

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The Japanese haven’t forgotten. The place is my living room, the time is yesterday morning Japan time, or this morning U.S. time.  I’m reading the newspaper, specifically the Yomiuri Shimbun, which has the highest circulation of all newspapers in Japan, over 9 million.  As I’m flipping pages, I get to the centerfold, and am confronted […]

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Pearl Harbor 75th and Happy Birthday Sterling R Cale SGM

 

It is not very often you meet a 3 war veteran let alone a Pearl Harbor survivor but that’s what the kids got to do yesterday as we toured Pearl Harbor. sterling-calesterling-cale-2

Usually vets who wear their service at older ages tend to be chatty and affable. There’s all types of vets and I’m grateful for all of them but it’s nice for kids to be able to approach the chatty type. We started our vacation driving over Donner Pass to SF and had dinner at Max’s in Auburn, CA where we met a 101 yr old WW2 vet who shook our kids’ hands and received a hearty thank you from us all. 

Sterling was born 11/29/1921 and spent his 95th where he was 75 years ago on a gruesome burial detail. He was a pharmacists mate who spent WW2 with the Marines at Guadalcanal, Bougainville, and Saipan. He was with the Army in Korea and had various assignments during the Vietnam war.

In Memoriam: Petty Officer Joseph Ashley, MM2

 
USS San Francisco

The USS San Francisco in drydock, 2005, with MM2 Joseph Ashley.

The USS San Francisco left its port in Guam for a much-anticipated cruise to Australia. Following months of boring repairs, the crew was ready for the 3,000-mile trip and already planning what to do in Brisbane once they arrived. Since 2002, the Los Angeles-class nuclear attack sub had been stationed on the western Pacific island allowing more frequent trips to foreign ports instead of its less eventful patrols around Pearl Harbor.

A Presidency That Shall Live in Infamy

 

President Barack Obama is photographed during a presidential portrait sitting for an official photo in the Oval Office, Dec. 6, 2012. (Official White House Photo by Pete Souza)Over three-and-a half centuries ago, exhausted from decades-long religious warfare, treaties brought peace to Europe while establishing an international system of sovereign nation states. Those documents signed at Westphalia started to develop rules of war between nations, which were later refined by conventions established in the Swiss city of Geneva.

Almost three quarters of a century ago (seventy-four years yesterday), on a quiet Sunday morning, the nation woke up to the news that a bit of American soil of which most had never heard — Pearl Harbor in Hawaii — had been attacked by the Imperial Navy of Japan, killing thousands of American sailors and others, and severely disabling our Pacific fleet. Had our aircraft carriers been additional targets at harbor rather than out at sea, the situation would have been far more dire.

As Don Surber notes, the FBI did not get involved, and no one asked what “their motive” was. Instead, before the week was out, we had declared war on Japan and, after their totalitarian ally declared war on us, on Nazi Germany as well. Along with allies, we went on to win it decisively, establishing modern peaceful democracies in the defeated lands. It was the last time to date that we have done so. Our nation has been involved in armed combat in the defense of freedom against totalitarianism many times over the decades since, and lost tens of thousands of American lives in the process, but we have never formally declared war and, more importantly, never been allowed to actually win one. From Korea, to Vietnam, the superpower that emerged from that global conflict was constrained by threats of nuclear annihilation or the dictates of the dictators’ club that we established at Turtle Bay seven decades ago.

Remembering the USS Arizona

 

The sinking of the USS Arizona means a great deal to Arizonans, especially to those of us who had the honor of serving at Pearl Harbor. There are many memorials on base commemorating the Japanese attack but none so moving as the USS Arizona Memorial, which was dedicated 20 years after the event.

One of the bells from the Pennsylvania-class battleship hangs at the University of Arizona in Tucson. On Sunday, a survivor from the attack was there to ring the bell in memory of those many men lost 74 years ago. Ruben Moreno, bandleader of the brilliant Mariachi Luz de Luna, played taps as 94-year-old Lauren Bruner honored his fallen shipmates.

73 Years Ago Today

 

Doris “Dorie” Miller was a Mess Attendant working on the USS West Virginia. Like most mornings, he rose before dawn for a dreary day of hauling trash, scrubbing dishes and prepping food for the battleship’s cook. While collecting the crew’s laundry, the General Quarters alarm sounded. Ships have drills all the time — even on Sunday mornings — but a sailor still must answer the call.

However this time he couldn’t get to his designated battle station. The torpedo-twisted metal proved this alarm was for real.