Tag: Paul Begala

The Democrats’ Hermetically Sealed World

 

I was barely 16, a high school junior growing up in a small conservative farm town in Oklahoma. I was weirdly interested in politics, especially for a teenager. Not long after President Nixon won a massive landslide in the 1972 election over his challenger, US Sen. George McGovern (D-SD), I remembered a quote from Pauline Kael being bandied about in the media. At the time, she was the film critic for the New Yorker. I’ve kept it all these years.

Nixon’s landslide should have surprised no one. McGovern’s campaign was a mess almost from the start of the Democratic National Convention when he gave his acceptance speech so late that almost no one watched it. He was forced to ditch his first running mate, Senate colleague Thomas Eagleton (D-MO), over psychiatric treatment (electric shock) reasons for Kennedy family icon and our nation’s first Peace Corps director, Sargent Shriver. That didn’t help.

Member Post

 

“The Constitution requires that the president ‘shall from time to time give to the Congress Information of the State of the Union,’ The Washington Examiner began its editorial this morning following one of the most forgettable “State of the Union” (SOTU) speeches in modern times. “From President Thomas Jefferson to President William Taft, this communication […]

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Conversations with Bill Kristol: Paul Begala on the Democratic Party, the Midterms, and 2020

 

Paul Begala is a veteran Democratic strategist and commentator, and served as counselor to the president in the Clinton White House. In this Conversation, Begala analyzes the key dynamics within the Democratic Party today. Looking ahead to the midterms and to 2020, Begala considers the Democrats’ response to Trump, the tensions between progressives and moderates, and the kinds of candidates that are likely to succeed. Begala also makes a spirited case for why Democrats must defend free speech and liberal principles more generally.