Tag: Patriotism

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Member Post

 

On Slack today, @exjon observed, “Condemning Nazis is the easiest political move in history. It costs Trump nothing.” I disagreed. There are a lot of ordinary people who fear that “Nazi”, at least these days, is chiefly a stick that elitists use to beat the proles. This fear, as many Trump voters like to put is, […]

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. It’s Fun Being a Girl Again

 

So, I’m in the check-out aisle at Publix and spot a fashion magazine and begin to browse while the fellows in front of me unload their cart of copious amounts of booze and Count Chocula cereal (I’m in a resort town and do not judge). This August issue has both summer fashion and highlights of what’s trendy for Fall – double bonus! OK … I’m an older gal, I don’t live in a big city, and I’m no longer in the corporate world, but I do love to keep up on current trends. I’ll never submit to stuffy pantsuits or short grey hair and no make-up – too vain – no … too self-conscious and refuse to get old – hell – I’m a Baby Boomer – I broke ground burning bras – why stop now?

Inspired by beautiful Melania’s cool dress in Poland, I pour a glass of wine and hit the porch to scan the new styles for summer and what’s coming. I didn’t get far. OMG! Why does Chanel and others keep running ads of two women closely embracing, this one with boobs hanging out of her fall sweater? Michael Kors ads have improved. His models don’t look like they’re on death row and the clothes are actually flattering – instead of concentration camp chic – improvement.

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In Jonah Goldberg’s latest G-File, he continues his dispute with Rich Lowry over comments made by Mr Lowry, Charles Cooke, Ian Tuttle, and Michael Dougherty in “The Editor’s” podcast (other installments of the discussion can be found here, here, here, and here). I won’t rehash all the back-and-forth, but the core question under discussion is […]

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Raised an Expat, Became a Patriot

 

I was raised as an expatriate in the Philippines. But for some reason we never used the term Expatriate. Maybe that’s because my parents are evangelical missionaries of the Baptistic persuasion. All our self characterizations were based in theological categories. Terms like expat were reserved for retired britishers who were making their quid fly a bit further by retiring in Asia.

But we certainly were not migrants or immigrants. Whatever our official legal status was in the good ol PI we were for all practical purposes expats. We were Americans living in a foreign country. We made no attempt to become Filipino, and we certainly were not there to make money. Our family consciously maintained an American identity. And this is not at all rare for evangelical missionaries. Paul’s idea that “apostles” (literally sent ones) should become all things to all men has very literal traction in the foreign Missions community. They give it lip service all the time but rarely is it evident in their lives.

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Always love your country but never trust your government. Robert Novak More

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The sad events this morning of the shooting at a congressional baseball practice in Alexandria, VA, will be played across the media world over and over. It will bring out the best and worst on social media among us, but @crabbyappleton posted a beautiful poem on the member feed that made me pause. It happens to be […]

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While taking issue with her characterization of the Mexican-American War (you’d think that a self-proclaimed proponent of American exceptionalism would pause before treating one nation’s “land grab” the same as any other’s), I thought that Mona Charen’s essay on patriotism and nationalism was a valuable contribution to what has been a fascinating discussion on that subject […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Patriotism Not Nationalism

 

National Review has sparked an important debate about nationalism. As someone who has been accused throughout her life of excessive love of country (can’t count the number of times I’ve been reproached for arguing that despite slavery, Jim Crow, and the internment of Japanese Americans, our country is eminently lovable), I feel a bit awkward rebutting anything that travels under the name “Love of Country.” Nevertheless, I must join Jonah Goldberg, Yuval Levin, Ben Shapiro, and others in demurring from Rich Lowry’s and Ramesh Ponnuru’s defense of nationalism.

Lowry and Ponnuru are two of the writers I most admire (at a time when that group is shrinking fast). If they make an argument with which I disagree, I’m inclined to question my own judgment. So I remain open to the possibility that they are right. But it seems to me that their willingness to believe that nationalism, as opposed to patriotism, can be benign is not convincing.

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Bishop Robert Barron had an interesting response to Scorsese’s new movie Silence. The article contains spoilers which I will not recount here. But in it Barron submits a provocative comparison of religious loyalty with national loyalty under extreme circumstances. In the following hypothetical scenarios, consider multiple objects of devotion — loyalty to God, loyalty to nation, […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. … A Government by the People, for the People

 

Before this election (long before this election), I moved here from Canada to live in the greatest country on Earth, and despite who wins tomorrow, it will still be the greatest country on Earth. Maybe not as great as we thought it was in the past, but there is still no place I’d rather live. I’m here here by choice, not by birth, and no matter who wins tomorrow, I will still chose to call this country home, because some things are worth fighting for.

America is not defined by who leads us, it is defined by the people who live here and call it home. Remember that as you look at your friends on Wednesday and the choices they made. This election has been so contentious because both sides see the other side as the cause of all that’s wrong in this country, when in reality, there is nothing in America that is not created by Americans.

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The Colin Kaepernick story is only interesting to me insofar as it illustrates an undeniable reality about our media. In this case, our sports media. More

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We just celebrated Flag Day. As I drove through our town, flags were lowered on Flag Day to half-staff. The news of the terrorist attack in Orlando was just settling in with a deep heaviness upon our state of Florida, the nation and the world. I have a handful of small flags that I tuck […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Remembering D-Day

 

shutterstock_238057456June 6 marks the anniversary of that Day of Days in 1944 when the Allies began the historic invasion of Nazi-occupied France. At great cost in blood and treasure, and with no certainty of victory, the armies, navies, and air forces of the free world concentrated their efforts in a heroic attempt to get a foothold in coastal France from which to repel the Nazi invaders.

We all know how that ended but on the eve of the invasion things looked grim enough that General Dwight D. Eisenhower prepared a statement for release in the event the invasion failed. Here is a roundup of some excellent links to remind us of the bravery, heroism, and sacrifice of those men — mostly very young men — who laid it all on the line on this day 72 years ago so that others might live free.

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. The America I Grew Up In, Now Gone

 

shutterstock_3359855Ever notice that certain people lose their cool whenever a conservative claims that the America he grew up in is disappearing? It doesn’t matter whether the claim is made by Donald Trump, the Tea Party, the Chamber of Commerce, or the RINO squish brigade. Mere mention provokes apoplexy on the Left.

“You preferred the America where blacks were getting hosed in the streets?” they howl. “When gays were discriminated against and couldn’t live openly? You think those were the good old days? You liked it better when the poor, the elderly, the sick, and the uninsured were just abandoned and left to fend for themselves?”

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Promoted from the Ricochet Member Feed by Editors Created with Sketch. Reconciling Faith and Politics

 

shutterstock_197666240I’ve recently discovered a little conflict going on between my religious beliefs and political ideology. Obviously I’ll find a way to reconcile the two because both are core to who I am as a person, so I cannot withstand such a bipolar condition for long. The first problem is one of charity. As I commented in the PIT yesterday:

So I’m conflicted between religion and politics. My church has an outreach where once a month or so they go to Seattle and distribute needed items to the homeless. I’m sure the homeless love getting new socks, clean water, and especially some of the other things like pre-stamped envelopes and writing material, but I have trouble seeing helping people in their condition as being more appropriate than helping them out of their condition.

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Promoted from the Ricochet Member Feed by Editors Created with Sketch. Conservatism and Nationalism in a Political Supercollider

 

shutterstock_25982731In physics, colliding well-known particles into each other at high energies can open up whole new areas of study. I had a part time job in college analyzing and cataloguing film from a particle collider. Before we had computers do pattern recognition, we had people looking at the trails on film after collisions for anomalies. It was a miserable job and I probably missed the keys to the universe through sheer boredom. All I had to do was blink and that whole new realm of physics was lost forever. Want to know why you do not have a flying car? Blame me and the hangover I had after a Friday night at school. I’ll cop to it.

The same applies to politics where, this year, we witness the collision of two completely different particles of different charge and behavior: conservatism and nationalism. And we are watching the trails right here on the pages of Ricochet.

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Ways to Give Aid and Comfort to the Enemy

 

Tinker-Tailor-BOOKAt the conclusion of John le Carré’s famous spy novel, Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy, British intelligence officer George Smiley recounts his questioning of Bill Haydon, an agent whose character in the book is loosely based on the exploits of one of Britain’s most notorious traitors during the early days of the Cold War, Kim Philby. Smiley managed to pry several nuggets of information from Haydon’s confession, including his contempt for Britain and rejecting his country for “aesthetic” reasons, only partly informed by morality.

In the annals of the world’s second oldest profession, why should Bill Haydon’s motives matter to the rest of us? After all, the Cold War has long been over, and one supposes that the huge corpus of espionage literature has moved on to juicier, more current topics. Still, this character’s reasons for switching sides retain their grip on our judgments, because Western educational systems have created breeding grounds for reaching similar kinds of conclusions. In fact, the contemporary relevance of Haydon’s thoughts is frightening.

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In 1944, Stravinsky added his arrangement of the Star Spangled Banner to the program he was conducting with the Boston Symphony in an effort to foster and preserve patriotism during such difficult times. The police caught wind of the radical dominant seventh chord in the arrangement and ordered Stravinsky to pull the piece on the grounds […]

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I think he does an excellent, very touching celebration of its meaning: http://www.prageruniversity.com/History/The-4th-of-July-Declaration.html#.VZeZ5_y2Wpo More

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