Tag: Patriotism

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Quote of the Day: Patriotism

 

“There is a strong tendency in modern American society to treat patriotism as a dangerous sentiment, a passion to be guarded against. But this is a serious misconception. To begin with, we should acknowledge that there is something natural about patriotism, as an expression of love for what is one’s own, gratitude for what one has been given, and reverence for the sources of one’s being. These responses are instinctive; they’re grounded in our natures and the basic facts of our birth. Yet their power is no less for that, and they are denied only at great cost. When the philosopher Aristotle declared that we are by nature ‘political animals,’ he meant that we are in some sense made to live in community with one another. It is in our nature to be belonging creatures. One of the deepest needs of the human soul is a sense of membership, of joy in what we have and hold in common with others.”
— Wilfred M. McClay, Land of Hope

I celebrate Professor McClay’s description of patriotism. Too often we hear of people comparing patriotism to fascism, to a Nazi mentality, to a kind of primitive unifying theme for countrymen to come together. Instead, McClay explains that our patriotism brings us together to honor those values we hold in common, to share our joy of living in a country that was founded in freedom and gives us the opportunity to become our greatest selves.

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Autumn Colors: The Color of Law, an in-depth review

 

When people are free to associate as they please, we can’t be surprised if they sometimes self-segregate. People self-sort along many affinities, including ethnic affinities. This is what lawyers call de facto segregation, and it’s none of the law’s business. De jure segregation — segregation imposed by law, including segregation promoted by public policy — is, on the other hand, very much the law’s business.

In 1866, Congress passed a Civil Rights Act (the 1866 CRA) asserting the equal rights of blacks before the law, including property rights, and real-estate rights in particular. The 1866 CRA warned

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Food for Thought, Towards 2020

 

Green shoots or suckers? Time will tell, but consider a few recent stories from diverse sources. Will this collection of dots end up forming a map to President Trump’s reelection in 2020? Perhaps.

We are told that the left has a lock on the minds of the youngest eligible voting cohorts, “Millennials or Generation Y” and “Generation Z.” Gen Y, the generation born near the turn of the millenium, is now 25-42. Gen Z, little talked of, like Gen X, is now 7-24. So, they are experiencing the craziness of the left’s cultural crusade first hand. Consider three articles on this latest voting-age generation.

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. The Subtle Patriotism of Hidden Figures

 

Hidden Figures is an all right movie about black women working for NASA in Virginia during segregation. The movie hits the usual beats about racism being bad and woman being empowered in the usually overly sentimental and unrealistic ways that Hollywood has become so fond of.

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Patriotism Epitomized

 

I didn’t watch the Super Bowl, but I’ve watched this video of Gladys Knight twice. Beautifully sung. Touching moment with our troops. Military jets soaring.

Every now and then, being reminded that we are all part of something bigger is soul-filling.

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Today I thought about the year 2018, who started as Baby New Year, and will soon be dying out to make room for a brand new page in history, a clean slate, a chance to start fresh. The year 2018 already seems a blur, and as I try to slow the stories and pictures that […]

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Donald Trump said I love my country and if that is what makes me a nationalist, I guess I am. Now it’s the new hate speech talking point of late, a vile, dirty word. I looked up the definition of nationalism, to see if it changed since I was in grade school. If you Google, […]

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ESPN announced today that there will be no National Anthem “broadcasted” before Monday Night Football this season. A long-standing tradition to honor our flag, our country, our veterans and our freedom, will be nixed to cow-tow to the latest progressive take-a-knee-jerk to protest whatever social injustice is on the plate that week. http://www.foxnews.com/sports/2018/08/17/espn-president-says-network-will-not-air-national-anthem-on-monday-night-football.html More

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Quote of the Day: Alexander Hamilton and the Dangers of Dissent

 

“There are seasons in every country when noise and impudence pass current for worth; and in popular commotions especially, the clamors of interested and factious men are often mistaken for patriotism.” — Alexander Hamilton

Alexander Hamilton, one of our great Founders, intended to speak to his contemporaries about the disruption that could happen in his times. But he clearly was warning all of us about the dangers of dissent and rebellion when they disparage the values of this country.

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Vietnam Veterans

 

(I wrote this story at least 30 years ago. It tells about an incident our family witnessed, and today, according to the Inter-Webs, it is Vietnam Veterans Day. This is entitled “The Honor Guard.”)

It was a time when the unpredictable psycho in a TV drama was always a Vietnam veteran. The Memorial Wall in Washington DC was still new, and still controversial. But some veterans who’d visited The Wall realized that it was also a place of healing, and they knew that others who might never get to the nation’s capital needed the chance to rub their fingers over the names, and see for themselves that the loved ones were not forgotten. A group formed, and they commissioned a 1/3 sized, fiberglass replica of the granite monument. It traveled from town to town, at the request of civic organizations, and when the panels were set up in their V shapes, and the ropes arranged to form a trail leading the public into the area for reverent viewing, people came. By the hundreds, they came, and I did, too.

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Strength: Women Who Answered When Duty Called

 

Young, adventurous and a self-admitted disaster in the kitchen, Julia Child had big plans. Her love of life and breaking boundaries led her into the world of intelligence. Taking up the mantle of spy, she ventured to exotic locations like Sri Lanka and China. While working as a research assistant for “the” William Donovan, her “first recipe” was a shark repellent she developed for the OSS, an agency later renamed the CIA.

She met her husband, also an OSS agent, and moved to France, while falling in love with the cuisine. Julia attended the Cordon Bleu cooking school for six months and studied privately with master chef Max Bugnard. Julia became convinced that French cooking could be simplified for the masses and The Art of French Cooking was born. Julia Child, an American woman who broke the boundaries of the enemy, as well as complicated French cooking through strength of spirit, patriotism and passion for life. Bon Appetit! 

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Scrolling down my Facebook feed I come across a kerfuffle over Tomi Lahren’s use of the flag as a theme for her Halloween costume. It’s a good opportunity to bring up a question about the flag code and what it says about flags and clothing: More

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I found this story extraordinary, given today’s squeamishness of political correctness. The world has gotten so distressing that Poland is dialing up the heavenly hosts for help. The Poles are scattered to every part of their country’s borders to pray for protection for their country, and the whole world. Christians, mainly Catholics, took to the […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Wild America – a Patriotic Bestiary

 

If a mortician is someone who does mortuary work, Ben Franklin was something of a bestician, for his observations on American wildlife began a patriotic bestiary which has never, as far as I know, been completed. Franklin observed that the rattlesnake (ahem) is not only vigilant, magnanimous, and courageous, with a rattle like the 13 colonies, but is also “beautiful in youth and her beauty increaseth with her age, ‘her tongue also is blue and forked as the lightning, and her abode is among impenetrable rocks'” (a blue tongue being of course indispensable to the American Spirit).

Franklin wasn’t as kind to our bald eagle, though, teasing it for being a “a Bird of bad moral Character [who] does not get his Living honestly.” The turkey, Franklin wrote his daughter, “is in Comparison a much more respectable Bird, and withal a true original Native of America… He is besides, though a little vain & silly, a Bird of Courage, and would not hesitate to attack a Grenadier of the British Guards who should presume to invade his Farm Yard with a red Coat on.”

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We have been repeatedly told that we have reached a post Christian western culture. When Tim Tebow is ridiculed for taking a knee to pray during a football game, we know that Christianity is no longer at the heart of America. Now we have football players, owners, and a good deal of the elites in […]

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Were these days so long ago? Please read the message that appears before the song and turn up the volume, then grab a Kleenex. I sure miss Whitney. More

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Loose Bull!

 

I hadn’t remembered that story in decades, but it resurfaced in a bizarre daydream yesterday. A recent Ricochet Question of the Day was why is Trump’s popularity rising? My mind was already reeling from days, weeks, months, even years of insane headlines, some on Ricochet. The story about the MIT entrance application asking to check one of 50-plus genders and list the perspective student’s sexual preferences, to a self-described anarcho-communist college professor spewing hate toward cops. Spinning in my mind were comments from Barbara Streisand and Cher to stop using my hairdryer and use only one piece of toilet paper … to save the environment. I might as well go in the yard and use a leaf.

Riots and protests from Boston to Berkeley, men now too manly, and sensitivity training commencing on campuses and throughout the military. Calling someone something other than their preferred surname can result in your job dismissal. So if your student, patient, or employee wants to be called Lobster Lewinsky, get it right or face consequences. Black-only proms and workdays – white privilege stay home. My head hurts from the nonsense. Van Jones crying on CNN because Trump only denounced White Supremacists three times instead of six, to Hollywood teeth gnashing and temper tantrums worthy of a diaper change, rappers rendered clothing – oh wait – that’s a fashion statement. I can’t stand it. Then yesterday it all became clear.

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When President Trump gave his speech this past week to the nation regarding the troop increase in Afghanistan, he also added, candidly, “ It’s different when you sit behind the desk of the Oval Office”. In other words, you can say one thing as a candidate for President, but when you are privy to what […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Member Post

 

On Slack today, @exjon observed, “Condemning Nazis is the easiest political move in history. It costs Trump nothing.” I disagreed. There are a lot of ordinary people who fear that “Nazi”, at least these days, is chiefly a stick that elitists use to beat the proles. This fear, as many Trump voters like to put is, […]

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