Tag: Partisanship

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So this poll came out showing how public opinion is hardening in our immigration debates. Several Evangelicals made a a big deal about this poll showing how white Evangelical support has turned dramatically against letting any migrants into the country at all.   More

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Why Andrew Weissmann Is So Despised

 

The list is long for all the people who have been criticized and condemned by the Right for their participation in the Trump-Russia fiasco. Many on the list pretend to be public servants but, unfortunately, they are political hacks who have shown they are willing to do just about anything to get rid of Donald Trump. But from my perspective, one man has been mentioned only in passing, and he deserves to be in the glaring spotlight of justice. His many years of unethical behavior and manipulation need to be not just called out; there must be a way to hold him to account.

His name is Andrew Weissmann.

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Death, Decency, Humanity, and Politics

 

Senator John McCain, after suffering a long battle with a brain tumor, finally passed away on August 25, at the age of 81. The Senator was one of the more influential members of the Congress during my lifetime. For both better and worse, his opinion on the policy issues of the day have driven much of the debate in this country for over the last two decades.

This, of course, doesn’t even to begin to describe his sacrifice during the Vietnam War, where he suffered years of torture at the hands of his Vietnamese captors. This was a true American: imperfect, with lots of friends and enemies, but he certainly sacrificed much for the great cause of his nation.

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(NOTE: The Josiah Bartlett Center for Public Policy, New Hampshire’s original free-market think tank, publishes a weekly email newsletter. This week’s newsletter is a little rumination on partisanship. It’s posted below, in full, for your consideration. If you enjoyed this essay, you can sign up for the free Friday newsletter here.)   More

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I have been thinking on political violence today; this is the 155th anniversary of the Inaugural Address by which Lincoln tried to prevent the worst kind of political violence, civil war. I will say a few words on prudence in politics as I believe it needs to be learned again, as a concerned foreigner & […]

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I thought I’d share this in light of Ms. Berlinksi’s interesting post on the main feed, Fear and Loathing Across Party Lines. A lot of members suggested that social media is behind the partisanship tearing at our social fabric. Others suggested it’s the blanket demonization of those with whom you disagree. I thought this Facebook […]

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Fear and Loathing Across Party Lines

 

It’s pretty rare for me to say, “Goodness, look at what Stanford’s Chandler Chair of Communication has to say!” And in truth, I haven’t looked closely at the methodology of this paper, and even if it’s flawless, let’s wait to see if it can be replicated. Still, the claim they’re making is interesting:

When defined in terms of social identity and affect toward co-partisans and opposing partisans, the polarization of the American electorate has dramatically increased. We document the scope and consequences of affective polarization of partisans using implicit, explicit and behavioral indicators. Our evidence demonstrates that hostile feelings for the opposing party are ingrained or automatic in voters’ minds, and that affective polarization based on party is just as strong as polarization based on race. We further show that party cues exert powerful effects on non-political judgments and behaviors. Partisans discriminate against opposing partisans, and do so to a degree that exceeds discrimination based on race. We note that the willingness of partisans to display open animus for opposing partisans can be attributed to the absence of norms governing the expression of negative sentiment and that increased partisan affect provides an incentive for elites to engage in confrontation rather than cooperation.

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Hey everybody, good news! The latest pseudo-scientific, liberal vs. conservative, pop-psych test is out, and it’s gonna make things great! Is this a circle? More

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I’ve frequently seen this theme illustrated in recent days by polling data on various different issues. (The results probably don’t come as much of a surprise to anybody that has read The Myth of the Rational Voter by Bryan Caplan) More

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Is the division between Left and Right purely political? Or is it pre-political? Is an identical division found between theologians, for example, that suggests a general perception of the world which colors all of one’s philosophies and judgments? This topic is open to all, but allow me to provide a specific example which is more […]

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Michael Corleone, President Obama and How Men Become What They Despise

 

“That’s my family, Kay. It’s not me.” — Michael Corleone, The Godfather

MichaelcoreleoneMichael Corleone, like Senator Obama, was the new man, the pinnacle and fulfillment of Western Civilization. He would save us from the simplistic brutes of yesteryear. Instead, like a French or Russian revolutionary, he became that which he despised.

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Politician, Heal Thyself

 

ObamaMaliki“I think the test is before Obama and other American leaders as we speak. Right now they can make a series of decisions. Regardless of what’s happened in the past, right now is a moment where the fate of the United States hangs in the balance. And the test for all of them is going to be where they can overcome the mistrust, the deep ideological divisions, in some cases just political opportunism and say, this is bigger than any one of us, and we’ve got to make sure that we do what’s right for the American people. And that’s a challenge. That’s not something that another country can do for us.”

President Obama held a press conference today outlining his response to the growing unrest in Iraq. Like his other statements on the region, Obama insisted the problem is more political than military. That’s a convenient rhetorical stance, but meaningless in the real world. War is the continuation of politics by other means, a fact we learned in the blood and fire of our own Civil War. Lincoln could have rightly claimed that the core problem was political, but he didn’t withdraw the Union Army from the field.

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