Tag: Obamacare

Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America agree with President Trump’s disapproval for national anthem protests but also believe it is wrong for the president to suggest anyone be fired for their constitutionally-protected beliefs.  They also unload on those who took a knee during the anthem, which turned into a referendum on Trump – a fight Trump is sure to win.  Thy hammer three NFL teams for refusing to take the field for the anthem, blast the Pittsburgh Steelers for condemning their own player who is an Afghanistan war vet for defying the decision and honoring the anthem, and shake their head as Bob Costas frets that the anthem is only used to honor military instead of teachers and social workers.  Finally, they slam John McCain for once again breaking his promise on health care reform and planning to vote against the latest Senate bill.  They also question Rand Paul’s decision to oppose it.

Richard Epstein examines the Lefts’ push for single-payer health care and explains why such systems are destined for failure.

Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America are pleasantly reminded the Democrats are also deeply dysfunctional as former Rep. Harold Ford, Jr. says he doesn’t know what his party’s economic agenda is.  They also sigh as late night talk show host Jimmy Kimmel suddenly becomes the media’s benchmark for whether the latest GOP health care bill is a good idea.  And they groan as four NFL players want to institute a month dedicated to social activism, similar to how the league devotes a month to breast cancer awareness.

On this AEI Events Podcast, Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper and Ohio Gov. John Kasich discuss their proposal to stabilize the individual insurance market and to make a series of other health reforms with Vox’s Sarah Kliff. The two governors stressed the importance of stabilizing the individual insurance market in the near term and maintaining a bipartisan approach. They spoke of the need for compromise as the health care debate moves forward.

The Affordable Care Act (ACA) changed how the health insurance market works, making coverage available to everyone regardless of their health status. This year’s premium increase and the departure of insurers from some local markets have raised concerns that those markets are unstable. Uncertainty about the federal government’s commitment to promoting this market and paying insurers for new cost-sharing reductions required by the ACA has created new concerns for 2018.

The Three Martini Lunch is on vacation for the week and will return on Monday, September 11.  Please enjoy this encore presentation of a recent podcast.

Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America condemn Republican Senators John McCain, Susan Collins, and Lisa Murkowski for failing to deliver on their campaign promises to repeal and replace Obamacare during a vote late Thursday night, while also stressing the mistakes made by GOP leaders and the major flaws in the “skinny repeal”.  Jim mocks new White House Communications Director Anthony Scaramucci for threats and vulgar comments about his colleagues, underscoring already fractious conditions in the new administration.  In an attempt to end the week on a good note, Jim and Greg discuss a new poll showing that more fans stopped watching the NFL last season because of the national anthem protests than for any other reason.

Republicans Working Hard to Save Obama’s Legacy

 

Republicans in the House and Senate are working on a scheme to codify Barack Obama’s unconstitutional Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (Illegal Immigrant Amnesty Program) into law.

Conservative lawmakers led by Thom Tillis are crafting a bill they call the conservative Dream Act that would provide a path to permanent residency to people brought here illegally as children, offering President Donald Trump an escape hatch on one of his most vexing immigration challenges

Alexandra DeSanctis of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America are actually glad to see Sen. Kamala Harris and other national Democrats admitting they want single payer, government-run health care for everyone and they hope America is still ready to reject it.  They also hammer radical activist Linda Sarsour for acting as if she’s raising money for hurricane victims when her real goal to build up the bank of her organization to foster division along ethnic, racial, and gender lines.  They also pound Politico for a horrible political cartoon characterizing Texans as confederate, Christian rubes who should realize they are being rescued by government rather than God.  And they close by shaking their heads at the cases of Americans who injured themselves by applying sunscreen directly to their eyeballs to look at the recent solar eclipse.

Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America sigh as public squabbles between President Trump and GOP congressional leaders and members leaves us wondering if they will get anything consequential accomplished by the end of the year.  They also wince as terrible poll numbers for President Trump on several questions reflect what may be a rough road ahead for Republicans in 2018.  And they roll their eyes and unload on Hillary Clinton over her new book excerpts.

Political Establishment Picks Wrong Week To Stop Sniffing Glue

 

Let’s face it: if Trump had more political experience he would’ve kept Scaramucci on for years before realizing his mistake.

Personally I was looking forward to Scaramucci literally threatening to take CNN to the mattresses. But the hysteria that’s followed his firing nicely illustrates why everyday Americans have such contempt for Washington.

Don’t get me wrong, I sympathize with the political lifers and the D.C.-media establishment who thought they knew “how things are done around here.” I fully acknowledge that it’s a little hard to believe that we’ve reached the point where return of Sean Spicer would bring a sense of normalcy.

Member Post

 

So the train wreck has happened: “Skinny Repeal” has failed spectacularly. I’m left shaking my head and wondering if we’ve just witnessed the end of conservative governance, or dodged a bullet. Given where we’re at, it seems time to step back and come up with something simple that at least might start to fix this […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Bill is joined by Brian Kennedy, president of the American Strategy Group, and the two discuss the latest news regarding the GOP’s attempt to repeal Obamacare. They also debate whether or not Attorney General Jeff Sessions should resign and if Pres. Trump is handling the situation properly. Then Steve Wynn, the Finance Chair of the RNC, joins Bill to discuss the RNC’s record fundraising haul and how the party plans to build on its majorities in Congress.

Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America condemn Republican Senators John McCain, Susan Collins, and Lisa Murkowski for failing to deliver on their campaign promises to repeal and replace Obamacare during a vote late Thursday night, while also stressing the mistakes made by GOP leaders and the major flaws in the “skinny repeal”.  Jim mocks new White House Communications Director Anthony Scaramucci for threats and vulgar comments about his colleagues, underscoring already fractious conditions in the new administration.  In an attempt to end the week on a good note, Jim and Greg discuss a new poll showing that more fans stopped watching the NFL last season because of the national anthem protests than for any other reason.

McCain, Murkowski, Collins Kill Obamacare Repeal; Americans Hurt the Most

 

When are Republicans in Washington going to find out that they control both houses of Congress? Soon? After years of promising to repeal Obamacare to bring relief to the millions of Americans who have been harmed by skyrocketing premiums, stratosphere-leaping deductibles, and vanishing insurance policies, Senate Republicans abjectly failed to deliver last night. Senators Lisa Murkowski (Alaska), Susan Collins (Maine), and John McCain (Arizona) joined with all 48 Democrats to vote “No” on a so-called skinny repeal of Obamacare, causing the bill’s defeat 51–49. Murkowski’s and Collins’s perfidy was expected, but John McCain’s no vote reportedly elicited shocked gasps from his fellow Republicans. I don’t know why. He apparently hobnobbed with Senate Democrats before casting his vote, so it can’t have been that surprising.

The “skinny” repeal itself appears to be an absurd bill that didn’t really repeal much. But Senate Majority leader Mitch McConnell apparently hoped, we’re told, that it would be amended in conference with the House. So the Republicans — who campaigned on repeal, who voted for repeal bills countless times — have failed to deliver. Murkowski, Collins, and McCain are scoundrels. (I of course have empathy and sympathy for McCain’s medical condition — but he deserves contempt for last night’s vote.) Murkowski and McCain, in particular, deserve our disrespect for having voted for Obamacare repeal in 2015.

Member Post

 

Can anyone defend the “Skinny Repeal” on the merits? It may be that the “maverick Grandstander in Chief” just killed a dogs breakfast of a bill which did absolutely nothing to repeal any Obamacare regulations or government program expansions. The bill had certain provisions we can all agree on: repeal the individual mandate, repeal the […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Repeal Fails

 

The Republicans have failed once more to keep their long-made promise to repeal Obamacare.

John McCain – Credit: Christopher Halloran / Shutterstock.com

Updated 3:10 a.m. | In a dramatic early Friday morning vote, the Senate voted down the Republican effort to overhaul the U.S. health insurance system, 49-51, with GOP Sen. John McCain of Arizona’s dramatic “no” — to gasps in the chamber — providing the key vote to send the bill to defeat. Lobbying from top GOP leaders, McCain’s colleague from Arizona Jeff Flake, Vice President Mike Pence and a swath of Republicans were not enough to sway McCain. Pence himself spent more than 20 minutes trying to get McCain to change his mind.GOP Sens. Lisa Murkowski of Alaska and Susan Collins of Maine were expected to vote “no,” but Republicans were confident shortly before the vote they could get to a 50-50 tie, and bring in Pence to break it. Before he cast his “no” vote, McCain had gathered with a sizable group of jovial Democrats on the other side of the Senate chamber. He returned to the Republican side, walking right past Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky.

Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America applaud Republicans for backing Attorney General Jeff Session even in the midst of President’s Trumps invective against him, including the warning from Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Chuck Grassley that there is no time left in 2017 to consider another person as attorney general. They express their continuing disgust as six Senate Republicans who voted to repeal Obamacare in 2015 refused to do so now. And they fume as former House Majority Leader Eric Cantor admits Republicans never believed they could repeal Obamacare if they took back control of Congress but used voter anger and expectations to win elections. Finally, rumors are swirling that former White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer might join the cast of the ABC reality show, Dancing With the Stars.

Nursing in America and the Right to Healthcare

 

Since the debate is ongoing about healthcare, let’s think about what this is really going to affect: healthcare workers. I’m looking, specifically, at the nurses. Yes, doctors, we know that you are also over-worked, but with 10-15 minutes a patient, you can see more patients than nurses can. Given how much hands-on inpatient and outpatient care we provide, the stretch in healthcare is going to be felt most acutely by the nurses who will have to do more with less (always doing more with less).

If we are not going back to outright slavery, then we have to acknowledge that there are limits to service.  We cannot make people work in healthcare.  As things get worse, fewer and fewer people will choose this career. Why? It isn’t just the money. It’s about safety.