Tag: nuclear

Join Jim and Greg as they marvel at the new hi-tech details surrounding Israel’s successful targeting of an Iranian nuclear scientist back in November. They also welcome the perfectly logical conclusion of the Senate parliamentarian that amnesty for illegal immigrants does not belong in a budget reconciliation bill. And they vent as the Pentagon actually admits its ISIS-K drone strike actually killed a bunch of innocent people but top officials somehow stand by the intelligence behind the strike.

Join Jim and Greg as they update the “incident” at the Natanz nuclear site and enjoy learning how it was much more devastating than first reported. Then they feel very weird agreeing with former Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid but believe he right to warn the Democrats against court packing. They discuss the significance of the FDA and CDC calling for a pause in administering the Johnson & Johnson COVID vaccine. And they discuss the inexplicable error of a Minnesota police officer in a recent shooting death there but also hammer Michigan Rep. Rashida Tlaib for suggesting this case is further proof that we need to abolish police and incarceration.

Join Jim and Greg as they welcome news of a “blackout: at the Natanz nuclear facility in Iran, and whether Israel is behind it or not, they’re glad to see it. They also unload on President Biden who is unconcerned about inflation following his massive spending binge because someone else will likely be in office when it gets really bad. They also call out Vice President Harris for apparently doing nothing about the border crisis since she was put in charge of it and the media who refuse to demand answers. Finally, they offer their well wishes to Texas Rep. Dan Crenshaw in the wake of concerning medical news.

The Reality of the Need for More Nuclear Energy Is Hard to Ignore

 

Shutting down nuclear power plants is a lot easier than generating reliable, carbon-free energy. As The New York Times reports on the tenth anniversary of the meltdown of three nuclear reactors in Fukushima, Japan, following a massive earthquake-tsunami: “As the share of nuclear energy in Japan has plummeted from about a third of total power to the single digits, the void has been filled in part by coal and natural gas, complicating a promise that the country made late last year to be carbon-neutral by 2050.”

Indeed, a member of the government’s advisory committee on energy policy said the nation’s goal of carbon neutrality by 2050 would be hard with nuclear — but, he was quoted by the Financial Times, “In my view, without nuclear it is close to impossible.” (So far just a fifth of the 50 shut-down reactors have been restarted.) In that same NYT piece, reporters Ben Dooley and Hisako Ueno tell the story of what’s been happening in Suttsu, an “ailing fishing town” on Japan’s northernmost major island of Hokkaido. There’s been a big pushback by residents — a firebomb was tossed at the mayor’s home — upset that the mayor agreed to volunteer the town for a government study on potential locations for spent nuclear fuel rods. No commitment, just a study.

Before Fukushima, the piece continues, resource-poor Japan had come to accept its need for nuclear power. That, despite its World War II history. Perhaps reality will be accepted once again given (a) no fatalities have ever been found to be directly attributable to radiation exposure from the Fukushima meltdown and (b) the reactor shut-downs have caused fatalities due to the national switch to dirtier and more expensive power generated by imported coal and oil. More of the rest of the world will also accept the need for a nuclear solution. More on that reality in a recent essay from the Breakthrough Institute’s Ted Nordhaus:

Join Jim and Greg as they discuss what appear to be lengthy, intrusive hacking operations into some of our nation’s most sensitive national security data. They also roll their eyes at Joe Biden’s defense of his son. And they unload on a University of Pennsylvania “ethicist” who want all frontline personnel to be vaccinated before the elderly because the elderly are whiter.

Join Jim and Greg as they welcome the news that a top figure in Iran’s likely nuclear weapons program was targeted and killed and they marvel at how it was done. They also bang their heads against the table as some Trump supporters suggest opposing GOP senators David Perdue and Kelly Loeffler for being insufficiently vocal about the alleged election fraud and believe writing in Trump in the Senate races would send a powerful message. And they groan as the media clearly intends to stay in full Joe Biden cheerleading mode, including one story featuring an animal psychic who says Biden’s dogs are convinced he will be a great president.

Join Jim and Greg as they see plenty of votes lined up to confirm Judge Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court. They also dig further into Joe Biden’s energy plan and see just how quickly he wants to wipe out fossil fuels. And they wince as Biden literally forgets who he’s running against.

Wayne Winegarden, Ph.D., Senior Fellow of Business and Economics for the Pacific Research Institute joins Carol Roth to discuss a free market approach to energy. He talks about why electric car subsidies help the rich, why overregulation hurts the poor and how Californians could save more than $2,000 a year if lawmakers enacted free market policies. Wayne and Carol talk about California’s rolling blackout problems and why big government is to blame, the big problem with solar energy that nobody is talking about, nuclear power and more.

Plus, a Now You Know segment on the Canary Islands. 

Michael Shellenberger joins Brian Anderson to discuss America’s nuclear industry, China’s deal with Saudi Arabia to produce uranium “yellowcake” from uranium ore, and Shellenberger’s new book, Apocalypse Never: Why Environmental Alarmism Hurts Us All.

As America pauses for Presidents Day – or at least the federal government does – Jim and Greg take some time to evaluate a few recent presidents who deserve a closer look at their legacies.  They’re presidents many of you remember well, but for some reason are rarely mentioned as leaders Americans remember most fondly.

James B. Meigs joins City Journal senior editor Steven Malanga to discuss the limitations of renewable energy and the need to expand nuclear technology as a source of clean and reliable electricity.

For nearly four decades, environmental activists have opposed nuclear power in favor of “green” energy. But as Meigs writes in the Winter 2019 Issue of City Journal, “nuclear power is finding new pockets of support around the world.”

Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America congratulate the Seattle City Council for letting common sense prevail when they repealed a controversial employee tax. They recoil as GOP primary voters in Virginia nominate Corey Stewart for U.S. Senate and wonder what the real reason is for Mark Sanford’s defeat in South Carolina. They also worry that President Donald Trump may have declared the North Korea nuclear threat over too soon.

Welcome to the Harvard Lunch Club number 174 it’s the Trump Pulls Out edition of the podcast with your ever so charming hosts, Todd Feinburg radio guy and Mike Stopa nanophysicist!

This week we discuss the demise of the Iran Deal, the near-end of the Obama legacy, and the next phase of Trumpian disruption. Does this really make any sense? What is the point here? Get Iran to stop with the terrorism? Did they or did they not stop their nuclear program already?

As North and South Korean leaders meet to discuss a possible peace agreement and an end to decades of hostility, is President Trump’s next move a one-on-one summit with the “honorable” Kim Jong-un? Hoover senior fellow Thomas Henriksen assesses the stakes on the Korean peninsula and what Trump could and should not do to avoid the frustration experienced by recent American presidents.

Member Post

 

I guess you heard about the false missle alarm that went off in Hawaii (a wrong button pushed). The screenshot is something one of the stories showed …and notice the great response to an “expressive” post by a liberal actress. However the great answer that followed had a far lower number of comments and likes. […]

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Recorded on October 6, 2017
A new administration means a new approach to federal energy approach, in the case of Donald Trump’s presidency, a new look at nuclear energy. Hoover research fellow Jeremy Carl, coauthor of Keeping the Lights on at America’s Nuclear Power Plants, examines the choices available to Trump on clean, green, and fossil energies.

Member Post

 

What options does the U.S. have to stop Kim Jong Un from obtaining a nuclear-tipped intercontinental ballistic missile? Short of the U.S. holding its own Dennis Rodman hostage to bring North Korea’s ‘Little Despot’ (short and stout) to the bargaining table, President Donald Trump’s possible solutions go from horrible to horrifying. Preview Open

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Welcome to the Harvard Lunch Club podcast for Septembr 5, 2017, it’s the You May Say I’m a Dreamer edition of the podcast with your hosts, Todd Feinburg, radio talk show host and Mike Stopa, nanophysicist. This week we are inclined, nay, veritably forced into the two topics of the week – (1) the end (or not the end) of DACA and (2) the end (no, no not the end!) of Western Civilization as brought to you by Kim Jong Un.

Mike makes a prediction that Trump will – as planned – announce the end of DACA in six months and that Congress – in Congressional best form – will do nothing during that six months and that (maybe) DACA will end uneventfully. Of course, the only time I predict continued Congressional gridlock may turn out to be the only case where Congress actually gets something done.

Welcome to the Harvard Lunch Club Political Podcast for May 30, 2017 it’s the “Pagophobia” edition of the podcast, brought to you by ZipRecruiter and SimpliSafe.

This week, we focus first on the only really important issue going on right now, which is the imminent breakout of nuclear war. It’s a hard topic to be flip about (though we do our best). Two articles frame the discussion. First, a piece discussing a speech by an investor named George Friedman, founder of Geopolitical Futures, claiming that war with Kim Jong Un is essentially inevitable. Saying that North Korea appears to have “offered the US no alternative” to a clash, Friedman goes on to say: